Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking at tent reviews on YouTube. I'm hoping not to have to fork out like 300, but with that being said I have several things that I'll be looking for.

1. 2 person. Doesn't need to be roomy though (share with my wife so won't need excess space)

2. Mesh all around but with optional covers would be nice to have control per how warm it is.

3. Lightweight as will be carrying to location not driving.

4. Hopefully easy to setup / put away and with a smaller footprint when packed.

5. Hopefully an outside area (right outside the entrance) with a rain cover idk what that's called.

6. Storage space inside. Sleeves or whatever to pack towels etc in?

BTW. As I have no idea about this. Will I need to put something on the ground before I put the tent there to reduce abrasion etc?
Will I need some water sealant applied to the tent?
In case I'm missing anything important please fill me in .
I'm looking for sturdy reliable tents that hopefully won't cost a bunch. Or be heavy to carry when I still need to look at sleeping bags etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Back when I tented I would make a floor liner from plastic that wrapped up the side walls several inches (not under the tent as some do) also spray the fly down good at the start of the season. Never got a drop on the inside in some wicked storms.
I have the Cabelas Alaskan guide model ( definitely wouldn't want to back pack it) .
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
17,468 Posts
Are you looking for a 3 or 4 season tent? Winter camping is different than the other 3 seasons.

I would carry a separate tarp to make your vestibule. Silnylon with grommets.

Yes, I suggest making a foot print for under your tent. 6mm plastic with or maybe a Tyveck. Cleaning the ground of sticks and rocks will make the need of a foot print less. Sand makes a nice base if you don't have to haul it far.

Was hard to get under 2#/person unless you make stakes and poles out of local native materials.

I would seam seal/thread lock (you will need to make the stuff - they don't sell the good stuff anymore) every stitch inside and out after you pitch it 2 or 3 times to stretch the fabric and practice putting it up and taking down in good weather during the day light.

Paraffin the zippers, or graphite perhaps one of those non-stick teflon dry spray.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't know how to quote sorry.
Thanks for all the info, sounds a lot more technical than I was expecting 😏
So you say I make my own vestibule with tarp or did 8 get that wrong?

I think mostly I would camp in any condition except freezing /snow. I thought 4 season were tents which has a mesh inner layer which you Could expose in the summer?
Not quite sure what you meant, what stuff I can't buy anymore but have to make my own.
 

·
-
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
I'd recommend you look into 3 person tents. most tents are not true to person size claims. Especially if you or wife are not super skinny. plus you want to have space for your stuff if it rains outside overnight.

For truly lightweight, i.e., 2-3 person sub 5 five pounds (unless your idea of lightweight is UL, then sub 3 pounds) you may need to spend more $ and/or look into no tent pole systems which use your hiking poles instead and really shave weight but they're not freestanding and require more guylines; they're frequently in the pyramid/tipi style (Zpacks is one example).

most mainstream brand tents nowadays come with mesh anti-insect interiors and rain flys, and are pre seam sealed.

for optionals, like vestibules and storage sacks, you will add weight but I'd def recommend a footprint despite the added weight. they can be used as small tarps, general purpose groundcloths, you can wrap yourself in them, etc. Just anything you'd want a big piece of synthetic fabric for, tons of uses.

For specific budget friendly brands, I'd suggest Kelty, REI, Sierra Designs, Big Agnes, there are many more out there. Hilleberg, North Face, MSR, and Black Diamond are the more high end ones which tout expedition level designs, warranties, etc.

If weight is your biggest factor, look into cuben fiber used as the material instead of nylon but they are very pricy.
In snowy conditions, snow stakes would be a must to me, usually sold separately.

4 season tent is probably more suitable if you need a dedicated winter tent in colder climates like in northern states. But I found that you can take a quality 3 season tent in non-subzero conditions and use it sometimes in winter as well in more temperate climates, especially if you also can rig up a tarp over that tent to handle snow load.
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
17,468 Posts
There was a really good seam sealer/thread locker that had a VOC carrier, the current stuff is water base and isn't very good IMHO.

It's easier to keep your tent clean if the foot print extends under your vestibule (roll it up/tuck it under if the vestibule is used elsewhere in camp besides right on your tent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,121 Posts
Ive camped in summer tents during winter weekend hikes. They are fine . If you are going to be in the winter wonderland for weeks on end ,yes get a wall tent or yurt. Im not a big fan of the low profile 4 season tents ,that are really for windy areas like mountains . Its nice to have a tent you can stand up in and have a stove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
Kelty Salida. The 2 person tent is wide enough for two people if both are skinny and have no need for personal space. 3 person is better. This tent is reasonably bombproof in bad weather if appropriately staked out, fairly light, and long enough to stash your gear at your feet.
 

·
Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
Joined
·
5,539 Posts
Recommend you go to both REI and Cabela's and look at tents. They have them set up where you can look at them, compare, ask questions, lay in them, etc. No-see-um netting :) Whatever tent you get, before going anywhere, practice setting it up so each of you can do it alone (one of you might be hurt/sick/etc.). Also practice setting it up blindfolded so you can set it up in the dark (Murphy's Law says the night of the new moon or the sudden storm, all of the batteries in all of the flashlights will die).

I have Cabela's XPG2 for my dog, cat, and I for BO.

3 pounds with everything, including 2 footprints (extra one used inside to protect the floor), fly, titanium stakes, bag, etc.

I wouldn't want to try this two-person tent with another human being, and I'm very small... I'd get the three person version for that.

A tiny whisk broom and dust pan $1 at Dollar Tree is priceless. Ditto for smething waterproof to put your boots on so they don't get the tent wet/muddy/dirty.

If car or other conveyance camping, etc., especially in rough weather, I second Hoka-hey on the Alaska Guide tent... pretty much bombproof, but it's too heavy and bulky to pack in on your back. Dogsled, mule, snowmobile, game cart, etc. no problem :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
I've used a lot of tents in my life. These days I've settled on Big Agnes brand. I rode out the derecho storm that hit the east coast about 8 years ago in one. It made me a believer. They aren't the cheapest option, but they have a lifetime warranty are tough as nails.
 

·
statists' be statin'
Joined
·
3,366 Posts
A 2 person tent is never big enough for 2 people. If I was planning to spend any time in a tent with one other person, it would be at least a 6 person tent. I have gear that I want to keep dry inside the tent with me.
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
17,468 Posts
I have an original North Face Mountain from the late 70's. Has 2 doors one being a tunnel. Has shock corded 3 section aluminium A frame (4) poles. I lived in several summers, mostly alone. A few years back I was in the local NF store. The guy told me to bring in the poles and they would fix the broke shock cord for free. I just fixed it myself. It is still in good shape but I doubt it is still watertight, I haven't pitched it in 10 years. I spent about 30 hours seam sealing/thread locking every stitch inside and out when it was new. It was a couple hundred bucks back then.

https://www.backcountry.com/the-north-face-mountain-25-tent-2-person-4-season

This is the current one only $700. Appears a lot heavier than mine which was 6# complete with stakes, poles, rain fly, and carry sack

As soon as I get my new china shoe patcher sewing machine up and running I'm going to do a tent. I'll use my trekking poles for the front A frame. The ridge line will taper to the back, so I will only need 2 stakes one out front and one out back.

I have all the zippers and 2 sizes of bug screen for the door and rear window - really fine noseeem and a more open mesh to keep the regular size bugs out but let good air flow in warmer weather. The fabric for the tent is Sportsman's Blankets, 4 total (5'x7'). I'll make a winter roof liner with a sanded cotton sheet (to catch frozen breath condensation) backed with mylar blanket. I really hoping the duel layer of mylar with the air gap will let me hide from FLIR.
 

·
Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
Joined
·
5,539 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
600 for a tent seems crazy. 300 is pretty high too but I would have to know what extra I'm getting for a 300 tent compared to the coleman darwin (85) I am not at all sold on brand names. Only quality I can see the difference in or extra features, lighter weight etc.

I come across an interesting tent that had silicone? On the exterior . Not sure what the point of that was but maybe it just is more durable /water resistant? Idk

Other than that as long as it has a vestibule, mesh for controlling ventilation and some kind of waterproof protection on the seams. I'm good to go.

I hear a lot of people saying two tents aren't big enough for two.
But really, me and my wife have slept in single beds together. It's a little tight but not overly uncomfortable. I'm 6 foot but slender, my wife is petite / short.

The very first tent I ever had for bagpacking was a one person bagpacking tent designed to be extremely wind resistant for the windy mountains where I hike. That one was one of the ones you have to get on your knees and crawl in there and it's literally a few feet off the ground and only big enough for your bag and you to sleep in.
BTW if anyone knows anything about those tents would love to see some good brands. Mine got stolen .
Anyway I digress.
I spend more time out of the tent than in anyway. Keeping a campfire going. Exploring around the tent etc. Not concerned with big roomy tents. I feel like it defeats the experience somewhat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,958 Posts
600 for a tent seems crazy. 300 is pretty high too but I would have to know what extra I'm getting for a 300 tent compared to the coleman darwin (85) I am not at all sold on brand names. Only quality I can see the difference in or extra features, lighter weight etc.
....
I don't think Coleman makes (distributes) ANYTHING that is other than Chicom crapolla. Mostly just a licensed brand name today.

Perhaps their stoves/lanterns are still OK. I don't know, as the units I have are old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
You get what you pay for when it comes to tents. $300 isn't very much if your looking for quality. Deciding on what season of the year and where you'll be using it is the first thing you need to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,777 Posts
I have been in some nasty rain storms with cheap tents and been OK. the key was a camp cot to stay off the floor. If one were to be in snow or extended bad weather, I would vote for strong poles and to rig a tarp over the tent. I've seen some cheap tents in deer camp with tarp go through some nasty stuff. Now I sleep in my expedition when out in bad weather or stay at the cabin. tent trailer and I have done many snow storms.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top