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In North Central Montana.
Been trying to buy 10 large heavy duty shelving units from Sam's club for over 5 months now. No stock.
Needed to buy a pallet of copy paper. None to be had.
Dry dog food has increased $10 for the same size bag in four months. That is a 33% increase.
What spray paint?
All of the potatoes that I have seen in the last year are already rotten or at least soft.
I grow most of my own food so don't have to buy much at the store, but everything is increasing in price or is hard to find.
I don't ever buy prepared foods like frozen dinners or canned soups but have noticed they are not plentiful lately.
 

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We still throw away half our food here in the US. I’m telling you, the fear many perpetuate here is far more harmful than the thing we fear, and is what has the potential to lead to longer term damage.
Better to be fearful and prepared than having your head stuck in the sand and be screwed when those fears end up being reality.
 

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I don't throw away food, I use everything and make sure nothing gets lost in the fridge. I realize that food waste is an issue, but I've never felt that the Best Buy Date was a day I needed to throw away food.

Certainly somethings I try and use before then like canned fruit & peanut butter.

Right now in my freezer is a turkey carcass and a bunch of veggie trimmings to make stock. It's pretty picked clean, but I'll still pull enough meat to make something with.

Heads roll in my house if food gets wasted. The first time in awhile was over Christmas. I made 2 dozen muffins and 2 that were being 'saved' for a member of the family didn't get eaten and were hard as a rock and thrown out.




We still throw away half our food here in the US. I’m telling you, the fear many perpetuate here is far more harmful than the thing we fear, and is what has the potential to lead to longer term damage.
 

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I don't throw away food, I use everything and make sure nothing gets lost in the fridge. I realize that food waste is an issue, but I've never felt that the Best Buy Date was a day I needed to throw away food.

Certainly somethings I try and use before then like canned fruit & peanut butter.

Right now in my freezer is a turkey carcass and a bunch of veggie trimmings to make stock. It's pretty picked clean, but I'll still pull enough meat to make something with.

Heads roll in my house if food gets wasted. The first time in awhile was over Christmas. I made 2 dozen muffins and 2 that were being 'saved' for a member of the family didn't get eaten and were hard as a rock and thrown out.
I'm the same way in my household. We waste next to nothing. My wife even cans dogfood she makes from the trim pile.

But I think that's rather unusual these days. My children have come home shocked after eating at a friend's house. They couldn't believe how much food went into the trash after a meal.

Restaurants are even worse. The waste is staggering. So is what grocery stores and distributors throw away.

That is the norm here. Still is, shortages or not.
 

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When we eat out, we take home all the leftovers, and often choose what we eat vs tack home because of ease of reheating. We take all the bread and rolls because they have to be thrown out. No loss for them.

Restaurants also have health safety issues, so they can't risk serving so-so food. We seldom eat out, it's not really in our budget and I cook better at home!

Restaurants are even worse. The waste is staggering. So is what grocery stores and distributors throw away.

That is the norm here. Still is, shortages or not.
 

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My waistline would be a little smaller if I was willing to waste food.
I was taught to always eat what was put on you plate.
I know people that under no circumstances will they eat any leftover food. They also throw out any food by its sell by date.
The stupid live among us.
 

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Supplies are going to be short for a while. As the article said. 60% of food was packaged and sent to restaurants, schools, and cafeterias. Only 40% went to consumers households. With schools shutting down, stay at home orders, stay at home workers, etc. More people bought regular groceries and thus shortages. Then when meat packers, farmers, farm workers had to send people home with Covid, that made supply shortages. A little shortage here and there, add up. Then the mandate for vaccinations starts and truckers can't go across the border back and forth to Canada, probably Mexico also. More shortages. 1-2% here, 1-2% there, more people at home not eating out nor eating at schools etc. It all adds up.

Solution, buy more than you need when supplies are available to prep the items. You should have already prepped. Then grow your own vegetables in your back yard. Go hunting, go fishing. Consume less, cook less. Good time to diet if you need to. Learn to eat foods you maybe never ate before but are available.

Hopefully Omicron will spread to almost every healthy person, and we will finally get herd immunity and it dies out. Also, hopefully no more deadly variants. Pray that it is so.

We have kudzu everywhere around here and it edible. My wife will not eat cooked collards, turnips, or spinach. I love them, and kudzu has to be cooked, washed for 10-15 minutes, rinsed, and cooked again before you can eat it. Anyway, it is in an empty lot across our street. So are muscadines, just haven't harvested them. Squirrels are all in our trees, but she won't eat squirrel either. Chipmunks abound, but no to that. Deer and turkey are in the national forest about 25 miles from me so I hunt there when I can. Anyway, a lot of edible foods are around.
 

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When the first numbers came out of Italy in 2020 it was clear that 2 areas that I have were more likely to suffer bad outcomes. One was over 65 (later it really became 80) and morbidly obese. I couldn't change my age, but I could my weight.

Through cutting down a little everywhere I've dropped over 50 pounds. I didn't throw away any food. There were some favorite meals where I purposely divided it in half and then in 5 portions, 3 that were 1/6th of it and 2 that were one quarter of the total. My husband got portions he liked... and I got to have 3 meals of a real favorite for me, while cutting the calories & fat. Because I got the same amount as he did just over more meals he didn't complain. Well especially when I'd make something like brownies and only have 1/4 of them over 4 days and he got the rest ;).

My waistline would be a little smaller if I was willing to waste food.
I was taught to always eat what was put on you plate.
I know people that under no circumstances will they eat any leftover food. They also throw out any food by its sell by date.
The stupid live among us.
 

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I became diabetic (type II), about 14 years ago. I immediately cut most of the carbs (sugar) out. Instead of candy or cookie snacks, I ate nuts, pork skins, and fruit. I also started using Splenda in my coffee, tea, and cut the sodas out. I drink water mostly with my meals. I try to limit my white carb foods like rice, potatoes, white bread, but eat more green vegetables which are less has less carbs. I don't worry about fat, and lost about 30 lbs. I also eat less. Went from 258 to 220. I want to get lower, but it is hard. Anyway, loosing weight, eating less will help in the long run with shortages and be healthier. I've read that people live longer 10 lbs underweight than any thing over that.
 

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I have been told that since I am so skinny I will be among the first to die as I don't have enough fat to substance me. LOL I have put on a little weight lately and will be looking to lose that as I feel heavy. UGH
 
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When we eat out, we take home all the leftovers, and often choose what we eat vs tack home because of ease of reheating. We take all the bread and rolls because they have to be thrown out. No loss for them.

Restaurants also have health safety issues, so they can't risk serving so-so food. We seldom eat out, it's not really in our budget and I cook better at home!
I often get disappointed when we eat out, cause I think I cook better at home too.
 

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I often get disappointed when we eat out, cause I think I cook better at home too.
We used to enjoy and looked forward to eating out. Thanks to kids running around uncontrolled and people talking in outside voices on their cellphones hardly makes a meal enjoyable. Then, with a voter-approved substantial increase in the minimum wage here then the pandemic woes, I'd rather go to the dentist than go out to eat.

We have a grill and a smoker. Not too much more is needed.
 

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I have been told that since I am so skinny I will be among the first to die as I don't have enough fat to substance me. LOL I have put on a little weight lately and will be looking to lose that as I feel heavy. UGH
Same boat, no matter how much I eat I am stuck in my weight class. Good news is my metabolism is controlled. I can handle very hot and very cold with ease, I just have to modify my caloric intake and don't really feel the temp issues. I can gorge for days, or fast for days, and my body is very quick to react and adapt. God made us all different, and some of us are just stuck with the ability to rapidly convert food to fat, and fat to energy. Bad news is we'll starve quickly if we don't plan ahead...
 

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No shortages? Really?

Let's use the Costco Wholesale in Federal Way as an example, just because a poster used it to tell me they're "calling BS" on my experience.

The bus trip takes an hour and 20 minutes. So I'll walk three blocks to the bus stop, take the bus downtown, then wait for my transfer on a street corner downtown where they're investigating a shooting right now. I wait 20 minutes and get an express bus. Since they now have shields for the drivers and staggered seating for Covid, they're not letting grocery carts on the bus. I have a backpack and two tote bags. After an hour long ride, I'll get off at the bus stop in Federal Way then walk four blocks to the Costco, do my shopping, then haul the backpack and two full tote bags (questionable, since I'm limited to lifting ten pounds) back four blocks to reverse the trip. Assuming both buses run on time, or run at all -- which is not a guarantee since they're short staffed and cancel multiple trips per day -- and if I only spend 30 minutes in the store, I'll spend four hours and $10 round trip getting three bags of groceries. Since I can't take the grocery cart, none of it is going to be bags of rice, heavy cans, or anything else I can't heft onto the bus and walk with myself. Now imagine if I had children with me or was in a wheelchair. See why we don't go to several stores to find what we need? We shop in our neighborhood because that's what we can get to.

Trying to get into our store after working hours or on weekends is a madhouse. The lines run from the back of the store up to the registers. People have caught on that everything isn't going to be available so they're acting like they're in a scrimmage when something in short supply appears. The store has staffing problems so they stock during the day now. People camp out when they see a hand truck and block the aisle so they can get there first. Fortunately roomie is 6'4 and 380 so nobody shoves him. He'll make a path for older or disabled people just trying to reach one or two of something. A good glare from him (he used to be a bouncer) convinces even the greedy people shoveling a shelf full of items into their carts to back off a little. I'm surprised the limits are only on meat, paper goods, medications and cleaning supplies right now. When you see someone take literally every bottle of several brands of cold medicine and check out two carts with 20 of everything they bought, it's time for more limits. Shopping is not at all fun anymore and hasn't been for the last two years.

People who come from out of the area act surprised when they get comments and hard looks. It's because they can go all over to different stores that they have no problem finding what they're looking for. Of course they don't think there are shortages. Stores are sized and stocked for their local markets. That's why there's more than one branch of the same store all over. After walking a mile and a half through an area with no sidewalks, up over my shoes in slush and dirty water, only to find someone from another neighborhood who has a car just loaded up on the cat food, cat litter, canned soup and rice I waited a couple weeks for the store to restock, I get an attitude toward people who "call BS" on my experience.
 

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No shortages? Really?

Let's use the Costco Wholesale in Federal Way as an example, just because a poster used it to tell me they're "calling BS" on my experience.

The bus trip takes an hour and 20 minutes. So I'll walk three blocks to the bus stop, take the bus downtown, then wait for my transfer on a street corner downtown where they're investigating a shooting right now. I wait 20 minutes and get an express bus. Since they now have shields for the drivers and staggered seating for Covid, they're not letting grocery carts on the bus. I have a backpack and two tote bags. After an hour long ride, I'll get off at the bus stop in Federal Way then walk four blocks to the Costco, do my shopping, then haul the backpack and two full tote bags (questionable, since I'm limited to lifting ten pounds) back four blocks to reverse the trip. Assuming both buses run on time, or run at all -- which is not a guarantee since they're short staffed and cancel multiple trips per day -- and if I only spend 30 minutes in the store, I'll spend four hours and $10 round trip getting three bags of groceries. Since I can't take the grocery cart, none of it is going to be bags of rice, heavy cans, or anything else I can't heft onto the bus and walk with myself. Now imagine if I had children with me or was in a wheelchair. See why we don't go to several stores to find what we need? We shop in our neighborhood because that's what we can get to.

Trying to get into our store after working hours or on weekends is a madhouse. The lines run from the back of the store up to the registers. People have caught on that everything isn't going to be available so they're acting like they're in a scrimmage when something in short supply appears. The store has staffing problems so they stock during the day now. People camp out when they see a hand truck and block the aisle so they can get there first. Fortunately roomie is 6'4 and 380 so nobody shoves him. He'll make a path for older or disabled people just trying to reach one or two of something. A good glare from him (he used to be a bouncer) convinces even the greedy people shoveling a shelf full of items into their carts to back off a little. I'm surprised the limits are only on meat, paper goods, medications and cleaning supplies right now. When you see someone take literally every bottle of several brands of cold medicine and check out two carts with 20 of everything they bought, it's time for more limits. Shopping is not at all fun anymore and hasn't been for the last two years.

People who come from out of the area act surprised when they get comments and hard looks. It's because they can go all over to different stores that they have no problem finding what they're looking for. Of course they don't think there are shortages. Stores are sized and stocked for their local markets. That's why there's more than one branch of the same store all over. After walking a mile and a half through an area with no sidewalks, up over my shoes in slush and dirty water, only to find someone from another neighborhood who has a car just loaded up on the cat food, cat litter, canned soup and rice I waited a couple weeks for the store to restock, I get an attitude toward people who "call BS" on my experience.
I looked up Federal Way, looks like you are in Washington, between Tacoma and Seattle. There is a walmart right across the street from Costco, and a Fred Meyer a couple miles away. you really shouldn't shop at Costco, especially if you can't take huge industrial size overpriced products on the bus.

Also you really shouldn't live there in WA. try moving to a nicer state. we don't have shortages in most middle to upper middle class conservative suburbs.

Also don't recommend taking a city bus, you say you are not in a wheelchair, so maybe study for a drivers license, or even just get a moped.
 

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No shortages? Really?

Let's use the Costco Wholesale in Federal Way as an example, just because a poster used it to tell me they're "calling BS" on my experience.

The bus trip takes an hour and 20 minutes. So I'll walk three blocks to the bus stop, take the bus downtown, then wait for my transfer on a street corner downtown where they're investigating a shooting right now. I wait 20 minutes and get an express bus. Since they now have shields for the drivers and staggered seating for Covid, they're not letting grocery carts on the bus. I have a backpack and two tote bags. After an hour long ride, I'll get off at the bus stop in Federal Way then walk four blocks to the Costco, do my shopping, then haul the backpack and two full tote bags (questionable, since I'm limited to lifting ten pounds) back four blocks to reverse the trip. Assuming both buses run on time, or run at all -- which is not a guarantee since they're short staffed and cancel multiple trips per day -- and if I only spend 30 minutes in the store, I'll spend four hours and $10 round trip getting three bags of groceries. Since I can't take the grocery cart, none of it is going to be bags of rice, heavy cans, or anything else I can't heft onto the bus and walk with myself. Now imagine if I had children with me or was in a wheelchair. See why we don't go to several stores to find what we need? We shop in our neighborhood because that's what we can get to.

Trying to get into our store after working hours or on weekends is a madhouse. The lines run from the back of the store up to the registers. People have caught on that everything isn't going to be available so they're acting like they're in a scrimmage when something in short supply appears. The store has staffing problems so they stock during the day now. People camp out when they see a hand truck and block the aisle so they can get there first. Fortunately roomie is 6'4 and 380 so nobody shoves him. He'll make a path for older or disabled people just trying to reach one or two of something. A good glare from him (he used to be a bouncer) convinces even the greedy people shoveling a shelf full of items into their carts to back off a little. I'm surprised the limits are only on meat, paper goods, medications and cleaning supplies right now. When you see someone take literally every bottle of several brands of cold medicine and check out two carts with 20 of everything they bought, it's time for more limits. Shopping is not at all fun anymore and hasn't been for the last two years.

People who come from out of the area act surprised when they get comments and hard looks. It's because they can go all over to different stores that they have no problem finding what they're looking for. Of course they don't think there are shortages. Stores are sized and stocked for their local markets. That's why there's more than one branch of the same store all over. After walking a mile and a half through an area with no sidewalks, up over my shoes in slush and dirty water, only to find someone from another neighborhood who has a car just loaded up on the cat food, cat litter, canned soup and rice I waited a couple weeks for the store to restock, I get an attitude toward people who "call BS" on my experience.
1) Your post said Seattle - Tacoma AREA. That's a huge area, implying that you can travel. Specific examples I gave are all within that area.
2) You made no mention of transportation restrictions.
3) Closer to you? How about a specific City? Burien, Tukwilla, SeaTac, Kent, and Renton are all fairly large cities and all fall in the large geographic area you mentioned. The more accurate you are with your area and your specific transport issues the easier it will be to help, if that's what you are looking for.

I was at both Costco and Safeway yesterday, both were fully stocked.
 

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We used to enjoy and looked forward to eating out. Thanks to kids running around uncontrolled and people talking in outside voices on their cellphones hardly makes a meal enjoyable. Then, with a voter-approved substantial increase in the minimum wage here then the pandemic woes, I'd rather go to the dentist than go out to eat.

We have a grill and a smoker. Not too much more is needed.
I bought a smoker just about a year ago. I had never had one before...just a grill. I have smoked I don't know how many slabs of ribs, even got brave enough to do a brisket, etc etc. I'm with you, I've gotten to a point where I would rather smoke my own stuff, get it exactly how I want it done, and avoid the nonsense.
 

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I posted earlier in the thread about going to WM and not being able to find crackers. Yesterday I went to the other real...meaning not the one or two mom & pop stores left...chain grocery store here. I actually wasn't looking for crackers, but decided to check as long as I was there. Same thing I experienced at WM....no saltine crackers, very little in the chips department, plenty of like Ritz/Club crackers. So the chips/cracker shortage must be more than just a WM thing.
 
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