Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Lunatic
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For backpacking. Anyone use them? How does it compare to sleeping in a tent? I'm trying to minimize how much weight I have to carry, and this seems like a good way to do that while getting myself off the ground.

What is a reasonable temperature range to use a hammock? I'd like to get down to the 20's, but I'm not sure if that is reasonable goal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
It's an expensive switch if you want it to be comfortable and convenient. You don't have to switch to a hammock to save weight.
 

·
Eh kay vs eh are dood!
Joined
·
3,304 Posts
There are videos of Shug(guy in the videos) getting down to like -20 and still saying warm. His pack only weights about 35 pounds. Your food will weight the most. Shug often goes on hikes, and sometimes will stay out for up to 8 days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
Switching to hammock really doesn't have to be expensive at all. Underquilts are the only thing that most people use in cold weather that I haven't really found a common man priced alternative to. I have tried hanging a second hammock under the hammock you are sleeping in and putting good underside insulation in that with about an inch or two gap between your backside and the second hammock. Worked well for me but I haven't tried it in temps under about 40 degrees. I'm convinced it is a sound idea though.
 

·
Lunatic
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Wow, great info guys. I just realized I'm incredibly ignorant when it comes to hammocks.

Has anyone ever tried a double size sleeping bag as some sort of pod? I'm guessing it doesn't work well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
A pod? As something to go over the whole hammock to keep warm? Sure you can do that too with the right sleeping bag and I'm pretty sure there are youtube video's showing how to do that too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Please explain more, I made my own and have less than $50 in it. I have camped with snow on the ground jut fine.
Switching means you already have a pad and sleeping bag. Both of those suck to use in a hammock, especially if you zip up your bag. It's even worse if you have a bottom entry hammock. That means getting a top and bottom quilt to make using a hammock convenient in cooler weather, but that's a lot of money. Add even more money for a tarp made specifically for hammocks if you're serious about using your hammock in cold weather.
 

·
camps in trees
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
Use my old sleeping bag and sometimes a pad just fine. Most of the time I don't use a pad nor need one. No need to zip up a sleeping bag in a hammock. Just leave it half zipped, put feet in, tuck the rest under your sides. Made everything else, tarp, underquilt, bugnet, even the hammock. Plans on how to do it all are on hammockforum.net Still fail to see any valid point. Just have to learn a differnt way of doing things and that seems to be most peoples problem.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
the coldest i had my hammock down to was 0 degrees last year in arizona and nearly froze. i was only using a 3 season down underquilt and a 35 degree sleeping bag. if i would of had a full length down underquilt i would of been warm. other than that one night most of the average cold nights were in the 30's and i was warm. i've switched to using a hammock over 3 years ago and will not sleep on the ground again if i can help it. hammock and underquilt packs up to about the size of a football and very light. i use a warbonett blackbird hammock. well worth the price.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Use my old sleeping bag and sometimes a pad just fine. Most of the time I don't use a pad nor need one. No need to zip up a sleeping bag in a hammock. Just leave it half zipped, put feet in, tuck the rest under your sides. Made everything else, tarp, underquilt, bugnet, even the hammock. Plans on how to do it all are on hammockforum.net Still fail to see any valid point. Just have to learn a differnt way of doing things and that seems to be most peoples problem.
You're not disproving my point. I said those things work. You said those things work. The difference, and this is key, is I said those things are not comfortable and convenient for a hammock.

A pad shifts around. If a pad was just fine, why did you bother with making an underquilt? It's because a pad is hardly ideal in a hammock. With the way it fits, I find it rather uncomfortable.

You can keep using your sleeping bag, but if you zip it up, it means moving around and very possibly causing that pad to slide out from under you. You can use it like a quilt, but that lowers its rating and wastes a lot of fabric and insulation. Surely you've noticed that quilts are already lighter than sleeping bags, and top quilts for hammocks are even lighter because they're narrower.

To go back to the tarp. You might already have one as your ground setup, but if you do a lot of cold weather hanging, then you're going to want to get one with doors.

Of course getting a new hammock is part of the equation, but if you put this all together, it also means adding a top quilt, under quilt and a hammock with doors. That's expensive if you buy it, and very time consuming if you make all that yourself like you did, but that's what it takes for a hammock to be comfortable and convenient in cold weather. I love that with a solid fabric "sock" it could be a 4 season solution that's very easy to put up and put away. I also love that all of it can be stuffed.





So here's my story. I used to have a hammock. Since I was new to it, I used my thermarest and sleeping bag. While I had a bottom entry hammock that made getting in a real pita, that's not fair to compare against since there are better options now. What didn't work was that the hammock would sway, which prevented me from sleeping. I toss and turn a lot, so that pad would constantly move around and I'd spend a lot of time moving it back under me, which made it harder to sleep. When it was cold, I'd zip up the sleeping bag all the way, but that was hard to do and undo. While I could buy or make quilts to get rid of most of those problems, a hammock will always move enough that I won't be able to sleep. That's why I listed that as a con. It's a con that cannot be fixed for me, at least not without drugs. I'd rather sleep comfortably, than to be comfortable and not sleep at all. Fortunately I can sleep comfortably on the ground.
 

·
camps in trees
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
That's great, you don't like em. So that means you must come in every hammock thread and trash talk them. You brought up pads, most guys don't use them unless its really really cold. Then most of us only use them once and see its pointless and we don't need them. I use my sleeping bag fine, never felt the need for a topquilt.



I hear a new AK thread starting, don't you have to go talk up ARs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
That's great, you don't like em. So that means you must come in every hammock thread and trash talk them. You brought up pads, most guys don't use them unless its really really cold. Then most of us only use them once and see its pointless and we don't need them. I use my sleeping bag fine, never felt the need for a topquilt.
I'm not trash talking them. Show where I'm trash talking them. I gave legitimate cons, and in the other thread I also gave pros.

I'm also telling this guy that a good hammock requires more specialized equipment, which it does. That's hardly trash talking. There are too many hammock threads here where a newbie thinks hammocks are inherently cold, when that's really because they didn't use any insulation under them. There's another recent thread where a guy found hammocks unwieldy, but didn't seem to realize that there were side entry hammocks.

That's fine that you don't need for a top quilt. Obviously saving weight isn't as high a priority for you. There's nothing wrong with that.
 

·
camps in trees
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
When I camp I normaly ride a horse so weight is big on my mind. I just aint got off my butt and made a top quilt. Been camping like this for about 3 years (when I made my hammock vs using a bought one) and haven't bothered me yet.

My point was there is no need to run out any buy everything and get it all at once. You said you can't do hammocks and op might not either. Get a hammock (and bug net right now) and go try it. If it works then get deeper in it. Part of the reason why I started making my own stuff, didn't have to make it all at once and just add toys as I wanted/needed.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top