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Tea plants... Anyone have any knowledge on growing tea? I have read that South Carolina use to be a major tea place. My friend is making a 1-2 archer farm, and I am doing some grunt work. Also is there any South Carolina specific(acid rich ground) ideas anyone has?

Maybe even a good victory garden/eco bla garden book that would be more commensurate with the south?

I apologize as my search fu on this subject is horrible, and i should have know more.
 

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Sic semper tyrannis
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Tea is made from the leaves of Camellia Sinensis sinensis, a member of the Camellia family. Where camellias grow well, obviously it will too. Check here for some growing and processing information...
 

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Sic semper tyrannis
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Tea is made from the leaves of Camellia Sinensis sinensis, a member of the Camellia family. Where camellias grow well, obviously it will too. Check here for some growing and processing information...
Not..exactly.

from the article...

Mack Fleming, a horticultural researcher at Trident Technical College, was in charge of the operation. Lipton concluded, as the federal government had almost 150 years earlier, that the unstable climate and high costs of labor in South Carolina made American tea production unfeasible.
 

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I planted some in planters/pots last week. Instructions say start in spring, but it takes more than 1 season to grow it, so I went ahead. Used organic potting soil with sand added. From the info I have, it likes temps closer to indoor range; outside is too hot in summer, too cold in winter. So if and when it sprouts, I'll move them to a windowsill indoors.
 

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Sic semper tyrannis
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I planted some in planters/pots last week. Instructions say start in spring, but it takes more than 1 season to grow it, so I went ahead. Used organic potting soil with sand added. From the info I have, it likes temps closer to indoor range; outside is too hot in summer, too cold in winter. So if and when it sprouts, I'll move them to a windowsill indoors.
From what I've read, it likes tropical temps, humidity and water. I suppose if you could keep the humidity at the ideal level in a room of the house and keep the temperature idea, it could be done...but I think that's probably the reason that the charleston tea growers eventually gave up.
 
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