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Discussion Starter #1
Is anyone else trying to get out from the thumb of the jolly green money giant? It seems that every time we turn around the prices of stuff seem to go up again! I am buying me a good wood stove. I have been getting alot of free wood from my neighbors so it just seems to make sense that wood is a good resource, especially during the bad ice storms the last few years.
 

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Good for you! I ripped out all my electric baseboard heat three years ago and installed a wood stove. It's my only heat source. A lot of satisfaction and security to see the season's wood supply (and part of next season's) in my back yard. I cut some, bought some, total heating bill probably under $500 for the year.

One thing I did right but didn't know it at the time:

You need an fireproof area in front of the stove, of course. We went whole-hog and installed nice ceramic tile in the whole room. With the cement board under it, the floor makes for a terrific heat sink and helps lengthen and even-out the effects of the stove.

Ya get a little bit more exercise each day too!
 

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Is anyone else trying to get out from the thumb of the jolly green money giant? It seems that every time we turn around the prices of stuff seem to go up again! I am buying me a good wood stove. I have been getting alot of free wood from my neighbors so it just seems to make sense that wood is a good resource, especially during the bad ice storms the last few years.
Great idea. If you have the money, get one that burns either wood pellets or logs. It will be more versatile, and using pellets can be less of a hassle if you have a timed release mechanism.

If you want to be energy independent, I would also suggest considering a geothermal heating/cooling system, which you could integrate your wood stove to make climate control even more efficient. Improving the insulation in your house, buying double-pane windows, making sure the exterior is weatherstripped, and getting efficient appliances will also help. Oh, and reduce your consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have asked around for wood. Now I have several people lined up for "tree removal!" I now have people waiting on me! Imagine that! Its great to be independent!
 

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Wood stoves are best.

Fireplaces with inserts ain't bad.

I've had a coal stove. Puts out more heat than wood, but this particular one at least also required electricity. Plus, coal sources are limited.

I built a Rumford fireplace in my last house. Whatta heat generator!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Coal can be a limited resource. If you know where to look, you can find it free for the taking! Try walking along the railroad tracks. Alot of the coal that gets transported from one end of the country to the other end sometimes falls off the rail cars.
When I was younger me and my brothers used to walk the tracks. I remember finding very large chunks of coal that would fall off the rail cars! I bet that if you went searching you could find enough to keep you warm for a while.
 

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My family has been heating with wood as long as I can remember. We have a fireplace in the living room, wood stove, and the main source of heat that we now use is an outside wood burning furnace. The outside wood burning furnace is a nice addition to have depending on how you load it and the internal temp at which you keep your house you only have to load it once or twice a day. We only use the fireplace and wood stove when the electric goes out for extended periods. Heating with wood is extra work when you cut your own wood and of course when you have to load it. It is well worth it though not only do you get cheap heat and save money, you get a fair amount of exercise, and more independence. If you own the property where you gather the wood you also get clean out dead trees and brush from your land.

D.
 

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I got an old cast iron stove from a guy I work with. He thought I would want it for scrap. Instead, I sand blasted it, painted it up with high temp black paint, and replaced all the rope gaskets. For now, it's just a decoration for my basment. I am going to look for chimney components to make it functional. My folks have the bottom section of chimney that is triple walled with the flue.
 

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I have forced hot water heat (gas fed) butI have heated with wood for 5 years now - cut and split 4 - 5 cords a year - neighbors give me their trees or I take down a few of my own - new homeowners always want some pruned so i take the branches - even when it's 20 - 25 below my house is 67 - 70 degree's. My wife thinks it's messy but does't yelp to lound when the gas bill comes after 3 or 4 weeks of deep freeze. Add to it an on demand gas water system and my gas bill is almost nil compared to what it could be.
 

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We have wood heat and baseboard heating. I love the woodstove. We save alot of $$$$ using it.

A little warning about pellet stoves. We are in a rural area and pellets go fast at the local stores. The last few years the stores would sell out and it could take a week or so to get more in. But everyone knew when the trucks were coming, so they were at the stores bright and early. If you weren't there as it was off loaded, you didn't get any pellets. It is not an item stocked all year long, just seasonal. At least in my area it is seasonal.
 

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I've heated with wood exclusively since 1980. I have 60 acres with enough oak to last from now on, plus neighbors usually have trees blown down in storms they want cut up. Counting new chains each year, oil and gas I spend less than $100.00 a year for heat and I cut, split and stack wood every time I get a chance, so I have a large inventory on hand which let's me burn only well seasoned, 2 year old wood. A couple of years ago I got to feeling lazy and went and bought a propane space heater. I loved it as I only had to twist the knob and got my heat with no effort. That lasted until I got my first $600.00 propane bill. It now gathers dust. Never pays to start acting too uppity.....
 
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