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Surf or fight
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just tried to light up my SVEA 123 (40+ year old hand-me-down) that has been sitting for about two years with gas in it. I cleaned the jet with a needle, primed it and guess what? It fired right up!

I love this stove!

If you are looking for a durable little stove that you can use on a regular basis or pack away in you emergency supplies and know its going to work when you need it, I highly recommend the SVEA.



No priming required for cold weather.
Control valve key doubles as a mini tool.
Wrenches required for field maintenance have been stamped into the key.
Brass windscreen has built in pot supports which fold in for compact storage.
Aluminum lid also serves as a small pot to cook in; detachable handle.
Rating: 4,700 BTU.
Burn time:Up to 75 min. on one filling at maximum output.
Boil time: 34 fl oz.(1 L of water) in 7 minutes depending on climate, altitudes etc.
Fuel: White gas, Coleman fuel.
Size: 5 in. x 4.5 in. (folded).
Weight: 18 oz.
 

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I've had mine for over 20 years. Still works fine.
All brass, a Swedish classic, built like a tank.
A bit heavy for some at over a pound, and I admit I'm trying a sub-7 oz. alcohol stove.
But considering the weight of alcohol fuel needed for x number of meals, compared to weight of white gas needed for the same number of meals....
the Svea might just break even.
I have fond memories of the Svea on hikes into the Rockies.

When you need fire the most is when it's hardest to start one. In the rain and snow, at dark, and/or maybe above treeline. A stove is a
godsend then.


"Pressure fuel stoves give a lot of heat. That's the advantage over alcohol stoves which you can make or buy cheaply. Gasoline stoves are the most fuel efficient. For all of the stoves out there, reviews show many people returning to the 100 year old design of the Svea. I think I can see why."

http://www.oldjimbo.com/survival/svea.html
 

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It's a little heavy, but built like a tank, reliable and can take abuse most stoves can't. Mine doesn't get used much, but for an emergency stove or a high-altitude backpacking stove, this is hard to beat.

ROCK6
 

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They may be heavy but mine has out lived at least a half dozen of my friends' expensive/more modern/fancier/lighter weight, stoves (a couple of which have died a fiery death)... Mine still works fine after near 40 years of use, and many jokes from friends, without a hiccup (still have the, unused, spare parts kit that I purchased with the stove).
I did make a concession to weight and got a found fuel stove (emberlit) it works as advertised but hasn't got the personality (and probably not the longevity) of the SVEA.

Enjoy!
 

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How much water does the small pot/lid hold? Also I am going to blame you for buying one when my wife asks why.
I don't used the supplied pot/lid. I'm not a big fan of aluminum cookware.

Go to your local Bass Pro/Cabellas/Academy Sports/Wal-mart and pick up a stainless steel cup or two.

Its an awesome stove with only one real drawback as far as I can see. Just be careful you don't catch the bug and start collecting Swedish hiking stoves. :)
 

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The SVEA 123 is an excellent stove, from what I hear, as that is one I don't own. I went to kerosene because of the Coleman fuel prices and their crummy cans for storing it.

This is what I have, an Optimus 00 military version..... heavier than the 123, I think .......



Everybody who is into these types of stoves needs to know about this site......

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion/index.php?

They have a vast amount of knowledge concerning stoves, and the people there are helpful with any questions one may have.
 

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I own 2, the hiker and a Sigg Tourist cook set, the Rolls Royce of camping cook sets. Love them! Beautiful in brass and such a neat noise! I do suggest having a spare fuel cap seal in your kit someplace, automotive O rings work just fine but for the love of St Peter, don't be tempted to use inner tube rubber or some such! The gas will eat it and either leak (BAD!!) or weld the lid in place (irritating) Priming can be made much easier by wrapping the valve stem in fiberglass rope or twisted matting and held in place with a couple of turns of copper wire. Pure cotton string will do at a pinch. This give the priming fuel (I just use gas bailed with the fuel cap) something to soak into and make it hard to spill. Other priming options include warming the stove in the sun or in your sleeping bag on cold mornings. Inside your pants and tucked right into Disneyland will also work. My favorite method is turn the stove upside down, put a spoonful of gas in the cup made by the up turned bottom, and cook off. Then turn the stove right way up, hold a match to the burner and open the valve. Gas will gush out. Also, you get some odd looks and the odd comment of "uh, dude.......doesn't it go the other way up?"

Retro fitting the stove into cooking pots is a hotly debated subject in some places, personally I use and recommend finding a set of pots from a Gaz Globetrotter, perfect size for solo hiking and the stove is a dead fit inside. I made a sock for mine to stop it rattling and to stop the ali pots picking up brass dust and general gunge. The smallest Trangia non stick fry pan with folding handle might have been made with the 123 in mind, between that and the Globe trotter pots, I'm fully tooled:)
 

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Surf or fight
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How much water does the small pot/lid hold? Also I am going to blame you for buying one when my wife asks why.
Mine came nested in a medium sized pot, then I found a kettle that holds the stove, medium pot and all the accessories.

Cup/lid - 10 oz
med sized pot - 6 cups
kettle - 9 1/2 cups



Everything stowed away


They may be heavy but mine has out lived at least a half dozen of my friends' expensive/more modern/fancier/lighter weight, stoves (a couple of which have died a fiery death)...
I have an MSR Dragonfly, barely used, that has been sitting for a long time. I was going to sell it so I decided to light it up and make sure it worked ok. As soon as I pressurized it the plastic pump started to leak all over the place. I figured it needed new o-rings but discovered that the pump itself had a hairline crack. I guess this is somewhat common(replacement pumps tout "improved threads for added durability".
 

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in the woods
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Wife and I bought a Svea like that in 1974, always carried it, best stove ever!

No priming, but we did have to heat our Svea to get it running, especially when it was cold, (we camped between 9,000 ft to above 13,000 ft). Either we'd use a burn paste, which worked, but left residue on the stove or pour a little white gas, (or whatever fuel in use), at the area near the top of the tank where the stem comes out. We'd light it and open the valve so the flame would catch at the burner when the gas was drawn up.

Ended up that I gave it to one of my sons, who still has it.
 

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My SVEA has outlasted several other more "modern" stoves. Mine continually cranks away boiling water for my drinks and meals all the way up to 13,000 ft and in very cold conditions.
 

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Re; priming...
I carry an eye dropper inside the stove (along with a BIC lighter);
fill the stove
take, maybe half, an eye dropper of fuel,
replace cap onto the tank,
assemble wind screen
squirt fuel into flame cup (it will run into the depression in the top of the tank,
light fuel.
A few starts will tell you how much fuel is enough and how much is too much.

I normally camp between 7,000 and 11,000 feet (It gets windy, cold and boring above tree line).

Enjoy!
 

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wanderin' roun somewhars
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Priming the Svea123

I've used a coffee stir stick for an extended period with good success. Simply cover the end with your finger and insert into the tank for a few drops. You may have to repeat, depending on outside temperatures but it's simple and effective.

I like the eye dropper idea, but I'd worry about the rubber bulb coming in contact with the fuel and failing after an extended period of use. Stir sticks are free, if you stop at a coffee shop or some such restaurant for resupply, and very light weight so you can carry a few.

Just a thought...
 

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I've used a coffee stir stick for an extended period with good success. Simply cover the end with your finger and insert into the tank for a few drops. You may have to repeat, depending on outside temperatures but it's simple and effective.

I like the eye dropper idea, but I'd worry about the rubber bulb coming in contact with the fuel and failing after an extended period of use. Stir sticks are free, if you stop at a coffee shop or some such restaurant for resupply, and very light weight so you can carry a few.

Just a thought...
The coffee stick is a good idea. If I ever end up with a lost or broken eye dropper it looks like a good plan B.

OTOH, I have never had a problem with the eye dropper. The white gas/coleman fuel never come in contact with the rubber, at least in liquid form. The eyedropper(s) I have been using have held up without issue for over 5 years.

And I think that rubber, in general, should be OK. My old 4x4 is over 40 YO and has a rubber filler neck where I fill it up with fuel. It see's physical access to gasoline every time I fill up, then is in continual contact with gasoline fumes.
 
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