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Oregon Survivalist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A humorous article and the accompanying video done by our local paper highlights the authors Svea stove
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/sto...2014/08/28/get-close-backpack-stove/14681049/

I can relate to the blow torch analogy- i've been using the same Peak 1 stove for going on thirty years now!

and the video;
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/videos/sports/outdoors/2014/08/28/14751893

I found it interesting that he is using an MSR fuel bottle; they are interchangeable with Optimus products. I've got a multifuel Nova that is bottle fed that required a MSR bottle to operate (i couldn't find an optimus bottle either). The multi fuel stove will run on any petroleum distillate, it resides in my GMHB along with a siphon if I should have a extended walk home.....

Stories humorous or otherwise relating to experiences with the various models of pack stoves will be appreciated! Thanks!
 

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I've used Sveas for about 25 years and never had the type of experience some people describe.

No scorched eyebrows or balls of fire in the forest. I always found the stove easy to light.

I guess I'm not as interesting as some of these guys.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I never had any problems with them. Some folks could ruin an anvil with a rubber mallet.

This is my newest (practically) unused military 2 burner gasoline Coleman on full. I like the stainless lid for the aluminum carrying case this one has. I have a well used one also and 3 of the one burner models. They all can be a little flamey until they warm up and quit spewing liquid fuel.

 

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Renaissance Man
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It has to do with overpressure. If they get too hot, the gas vapor will blow out the safety valve and ignite. It's really not that big a deal, it's designed to do that so it will burn out instead of blow up. I've had it happen a couple times. The first time was unexpected and induced a bit of panic, but after watching it sit there and burn for a while, realized it was not a big deal.

I've still got my Svea, and it's a good backup stove and it will burn almost any kind of unleaded gasoline. It will probably still work 100 years from now as it's very simple and have only a couple moving parts. It's also easily rebuildable and repairable in the field, although I've never had to do that.

But it's heavy and noisy. In warmer weather I like my energy drink alcohol stove. It weighs less than 2 oz and boils 2 cups of water in 2 mins. It also uses very little fuel, so fuel weight is next to nothing as well. It also cost nothing, which is a nice perk.

Az
 

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M.R. Not
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4,677 Posts
I've used Sveas for about 25 years and never had the type of experience some people describe.
I'm sorry 25 years and 30 years, it's been since the early 60's since I use my Svea stove, no problems no burnt eyebrows, is there a problem with this great stove?

That's over 55 years, yeah there are better stoves now, but the Svea is a GREAT stove.



Rancher
 

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123 owner:) Beautiful in brass, easily fixed (haven't had to yet) runs on the most common liquid fuel on the planet. Great noise. Have no intention of trading it in/up but would if someone made a BETTER stove, not just more complicated.
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It has to do with overpressure. If they get too hot, the gas vapor will blow out the safety valve and ignite. It's really not that big a deal, it's designed to do that so it will burn out instead of blow up. I've had it happen a couple times. The first time was unexpected and induced a bit of panic, but after watching it sit there and burn for a while, realized it was not a big deal.

Az
I was preparing lunch during a snow day trip when i got the fuel air mix wrong on my peak 1, it caught fire, i got fuel on me/jacket/mittens and caught fire too!. I knocked the stove off the fence post where it had been residing and it quickly sank away from sight into a snow bank below.
I put me out, and dug down a few feet into the snow to retrieve my stove, the fire was out but the stove had started to generate and was now running just fine!
 

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I have to reply to this also, being the owner of several Svea model 123's. And several other Svea, Optimus and other Swedish stoves.

The 123 is a standard pressure stove. I have never had an eye brow burning experience, or anything like the author of this article has had.

There is one neat accessory that I have picked up a couple of years ago for the 123's. The quietstove silent burner. this item very much quiets the stove down, but that aside, operates as normal. They are a little pricy for what they are, but I like mine.
 

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One of the starting techniques for my 123 is to turn it upside down and pour a spoonful of gas into the concave underside then solomnly light it and warm my hands. At this point someone will say something like 'um dude, dont you light the other end? Look stunned, reverse the now warmed up and nicely pressurised stove and light.

Or the 'fire ball' method for starting steel cased 8R's on cold mornings, self-explanitory that one.

Cartridges were never this much fun.
 

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Thank you for that. I haven't tried it, but it sounds like a pretty slick idea.

However it happens, that initial pressure, via heat, needs to be created for the stove to be usable.



One of the starting techniques for my 123 is to turn it upside down and pour a spoonful of gas into the concave underside then solomnly light it and warm my hands. At this point someone will say something like 'um dude, dont you light the other end? Look stunned, reverse the now warmed up and nicely pressurised stove and light.

Or the 'fire ball' method for starting steel cased 8R's on cold mornings, self-explanitory that one.

Cartridges were never this much fun.
 

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Ordinary Average Guy
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The burners in my pressurized alcohol stove are made by Svea. I love that thing. Never a problem when I have played with it.... A lot of people have burned their boats to the waterline because they failed to follow the pre-heating directions...
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Preheating especially in the colder climates and elevations during winter camp outs has always been important for effective lighting in my liquid fueled lanterns and stoves.

Joe' can you explain about the quietstove silent burner further? How is it used/attached? It is a permanent fixture and how does it affect performance?

This is a new one for me and I'd appreciate your insight and experience on this.

My Nova sound like a jet engine when it gets going and i know some of the variants of the MSR XGK are similar too.

Thanks for all the continued input folks.
 

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regular
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Joe' can you explain about the quietstove silent burner further? How is it used/attached? It is a permanent fixture and how does it affect performance?
Here are a couple of links. You esentially pull the flame spreader, and install this device.

Amazon.com : QUIETSTOVE? SILENT MUTER DAMPER CAP for SVEA 123/123R BACKPACKING CAMPING STOVE : Optimus Svea : Sports & Outdoors

It is expensive. As much as a Svea 123.

Also, the QuietStove people have video's on Youtube that somewhat shows how much quieter this device is, vs the 123 in its standard configuration.

Hope this helps,
 

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Never liked the Svea's either. I've also got a Peak 1 that I've had for over 25 years. Still works just fine.

Guess the Svea vs. Peak 1, etc. is just another one of those personal preferences.
 

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Never liked the Svea's either. I've also got a Peak 1 that I've had for over 25 years. Still works just fine.

Guess the Svea vs. Peak 1, etc. is just another one of those personal preferences.

that's OK, we all have our preferences, and are here to learn from each others experiences.

I'm not familiar with the Peak 1. Can you share some more about the stove you have? Any pictures?
 

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Why would I want to quiet my 123? I love that sound!
Maybe you wouldn't.

It may be more a reflection back on myself, and that I think so highly of these stoves that I have spent stupid money on accessories for them.

Is there even a distant second to these small hiking stoves?
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the post and the link Joe it does help.

I see they make one for my nova but it costs almost as much as my stove and it limits the multi fuel capability.

The peak 1 has been around for a long time. i got my first one in 1981'ish and my most recent stove/lantern combo as a gift from my BIL.

The latest model eliminates a valve so fuel and flame are now controlled by a single lever.

They are resilient, i have had my stoves fully engulfed with only mild wrinkling of the labeling afterwards. Fuel to air ratio is important and too rich a mix can result especially initially with a large yellow/orange flame, until the stove generator starts to vaporizes and heats the fuel mix. an additional minute of pumping is important to maintain tank pressure. They start quick and can be adjusted well. the wind screen can be effective.

Sometime fuel splash can involve the tank. and can ignite. Over the years i have seen a few stoves go airborne as scouts/campers have tossed it away from their shelters.

I preheat in winter climes.
https://tse4.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608023341947489999&pid=15.1&H=230&W=160

the newer model
https://tse4.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608004903659374275&pid=15.1&H=213&W=160

thanks folks for all the input!
 

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I've used Sveas for about 25 years and never had the type of experience some people describe.

No scorched eyebrows or balls of fire in the forest. I always found the stove easy to light.

I guess I'm not as interesting as some of these guys.
they have been the gold standard for hiking stoves for roughly the last 100 years. I wish I could find the link to this story to share with the forum, but the short of it was some guy in the northern part of the US left his Svea 123 in a bucket in the back of his pickup over the winter.

The bucket had filled with rain water, then was frozen over the winter. He didn't (re)discover his stove till the spring thaw came along. He had commented that all that was necessary was to pull it out of the icy water and wipe it off. Didn't even change out the old fuel that was in it. Just warmed the lower portion to generate some pressure and it fired right up.

I bet there are not a lot of newer stoves that would survive a similar experience.
 
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