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Always Loaded
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I am in need of a decent suture kit. I'm not well trained, so I don't need a top tier kit. Something inexpensive, relatively, but still quality would be best. I have noticed Amazon offering a number of "training" kits complete with needles and sutures, as well as fake skin. Is there any reason these training kits would not be useable in a real world situation?
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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I doubt the training kits are using true, medical grade, sterile sutures. They're expensive. Those kits most likely contain either thread of some kind, or expired, or non sterile sutures. There are different types of sutures for different applications. You can get a ton of info on suturing online and probably from youtube as well. Then put your own training kit together and order your own sutures. They can be found online as well.
 

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The training kits used expired threads, not that such is an issue of concern, and are limited in the application by offering only two-three very common threads. The kit here:

https://www.amazon.com/Suture-Pract...&qid=1600224326&sprefix=suture,aps,349&sr=8-3

has 2-0, 3-0 and 4-0 sizes included. 5-0 is more common than any other assuming you aren't suturing over the knee or the shoulder area. The higher the number the smaller the thread diameter, BTW.

The instruments are also low-end Pakistani which are fit for practice use. Reading the reviews - those not obviously by payed shills as Amazon is plagued by any more - you also see the needle drivers are less than decent, they offer toothed Adson forceps only and no plain tip models. There is more than merely driving a needle in one side and out the other and tying it.

I recently sold several practice kits that were basic - plastic baggy, etc. rather than a case - and made sure to include various sutures ranging from common 5-0 polyethylene to 0 cotton, to 3-0 Vicryl (absorbing, internal use), double needles, empty thread-your-own needles in two sizes, and more. There were also Steri-Strips and Tincture of Benzoin swabs for use with same, and syringes, needles and filled ampules to practice drawing up and administering locals.

Suturing is a process. To properly learn you ought to glove up, prep the site, administer a local (water works just as well for practice), and approximate, trim, etc. Practice on suture pads, chicken breasts, pigs feet and tenderized steak. Different tissue types call for different skills, thread sizes and materials and take practice.

BTW, I am not offering such kits - I sold what I had and do not sell on this forum in any case. Just offering some food for thought.

RR
 

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For home or clinic use consider laceration trays, they're sterile, cheap, and intended for single procedure use. Many types available, this one https://www.shopmedvet.com/product/66820 includes syringe and needles for the anesthetic. The trays wouldn't hold up well bouncing around in a FAK, better for home use or to take with the injured if medical care is available but medical supplies are scarce.

1% lidocaine available without license or prescription here https://www.mountainside-medical.com/products/hospira-1-lidocaine-50ml-vial

Shop around for the rest; assorted sutures, separate syringe for irrigation, antiseptic.
 

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Always Loaded
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Discussion Starter #8
Mountainside medical is a great source for Lidocaine. Clearly the practice kits are nt optimal. I'm looking at the mymedic.com suture kit. It's $75 but looks well made. Does anyone have a recommended kit?
 

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There are pig dog kits that have a stapler. I mean it should work and be easy to use.

http://vi.raptor.ebaydesc.com/ws/eB...3&pm=1&ds=0&t=1598897225000&ver=0&cspheader=1

I can't imagine it would be very pleasant.

I’ve been stitched up without a local and it is not something I’d like to experience again.
I think staples (if applicable ) would be preferable and I think a lot easier if you had to do yourself.

I can’t remember where I learned it but duct tape folded over a heavy cord (shoelace) and applied to either side of the cut can then be stitched together to close a wound without having to pierce the skin.
I guess it’d work better than duct taping the wound shut.
 

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There are pig dog kits that have a stapler. I mean it should work and be easy to use.

http://vi.raptor.ebaydesc.com/ws/eB...3&pm=1&ds=0&t=1598897225000&ver=0&cspheader=1

I can't imagine it would be very pleasant.

I’ve been stitched up without a local and it is not something I’d like to experience again.
I think staples (if applicable ) would be preferable and I think a lot easier if you had to do yourself.

I can’t remember where I learned it but duct tape folded over a heavy cord (shoelace) and applied to either side of the cut can then be stitched together to close a wound without having to pierce the skin.
I guess it’d work better than duct taping the wound shut.
Which is the point of it for pig dogs I assume. As they would be a bugger to manually stitch up in the bush.


Anyway a video someone using it.


https://youtu.be/uzpswG7UXME
 

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Coon dogs are good too. The good ones want to fight when mr. Furry runs the tree tops and climbs down to run some more...Sharp teeth and claws....
 

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Texas chooses people.
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I picked up a mil surplus in excellent condition. It will do. However, those circle catfish hooks might work with a few mods. ;)
 

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In a field environment you don't want to suture, but use butterfly strips and tincture of benzoin to ensure adhesive sticks. Irrigate, pack with betadyne and sugar and then redress daily, leaving wound open enough to drain. Otherwise you are creating an environment to encourage infection and making big trouble for yourself.
 

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Destroyer of Karen
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Here is a kit with good reviews and a wide variety of suture types, including absorbable.

https://www.amazon.com/Students-Sur...ACG3AT5WBFK&psc=1&refRID=AT4FJ0SSGACG3AT5WBFK
Most of those sutures are worthless for skin stitching.

First size is important, you want either 3-0 or 4-0; 2-0 is too big and 5-0 is too small.

Second the type of suture is very important, anything braided is a no go as it harbors bacteria and would have to cut it out in less than 24 hours.

Nylon and Prolene are all you can really use for skin (Yes chromic is an options but its so stiff and awkward I haven;t seen it used outside of bladder reaper in years and even then new docs are using vicryl)

TL;DR: Only get 3-0 and 4-0 Nylon or polypropylene with a cutting needle
 

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learned suturing and minor surgical procedures back in the day. when i decided to upgrade from the mil issue little kits, i went on Amazon and searched for vivisection/dissection kits used by college premed and medical students. i ended up getting two different ones to get some duplicates and all the instruments i was familiar with and knew how to use. near as i remember (this was a few years ago) i paid about $40 or so for each one. the manufacturing and stainless quality was quite good being of German origin, not Chinese! good luck to you.
 
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