Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am moving to WI. Where it is winter almost half the year. It would be the first time my wife and daughter have been through a winter. I have a Survival kit in the works along with a BOB. I was wondering if there were any suggestions for being prepared to survive with a 2 year old. Anything I could or should add to my kit? She eats what we eat. Should I just double my blankets?
 

·
Knocked Down But Up Again
Joined
·
5,579 Posts
Even the sweetest child can get stir-crazy. Make sure you have enough entertainment for her after the novelty of snow wears off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Id also suggest a good staple of basic medicines for a child her age. In case you get snowed in or pharmacies are closed, there is not alot worst than having a sick child and no medicines to help ease her suffering.

Oh and plenty of hot cocoa and marshmellows. Dont be one of those parents without enough hot cocoa dog gone it. Special place in hell for those types. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,674 Posts
Make sure that you train your daughter to be a part of your survival life style. There are a lot of things that a 2 year old can do.

She can help wash vegetables for dinner, and help set the table, and vacumn or help make her bed.

She can help bring in kindling for the fire. Shop for healthy food and good cloths from the thrift store.

She can entertain you with her stories like you entertain her. Encourage her to use her imagination.

Make sure she is warm, thoughs full body sleepers are great. You might get a couple for the adults in the family. Teach her that she needs to keep warm to stay healthy..

In the spring show her the wonders of the dirt in the garden. Let her plant in the garden with you. The lines may not be straight, but the best tasting vegetables will come from your daughters' rows.

Let her explore her new world and she will find the beauty in it and show it to you. You are so lucky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,814 Posts
Forget the down sleeping bag for the little one, at two they still have "accidents " and wet down loses the insulation quality. A decent fiber fill is warm and easy to wash.
Treats , my kids at that age loved graham crackers, jello and beanies and weenies.
Little ones at that age still think mommy and daddy are the greatest ( unlike teenagers)
So if you get them involved in what your doing they'll be great. Even their own job.
When my oldest daughter was that age , one of her jobs was to take care of shoes and boots that were kicked off when people came into the house. She took a lot of pride in having them paired up and lined against the wall by the front door. She always got a lot of praise for the good job she had done.
Kids feel good when they feel like their contributing their fair share.....
.............Alaskan......Father of four.....
 

·
DIY RPG's
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
my little one is three and she helped this year with the garden and like ramona said the best veggies do come from the plants that your little one planted. my daughter love that powdered applecider stuff. also kyra likes to go fishing. if you can take your little one out to go fishing with daddy they will quickly pick it up as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
We include a doctor Suess book or two for reading to ours. Big pictures with a lot of color are good. We also include "sweets" that they like. For ours the marshmellows are a bad idea she thinks they are "stickie ickie" So we include trail mix or Granola bars. Water straight is not always best we use Crystal light to give it some flavor we have also used Gatorade powder in the past in case the kids also are sweeting a lot in the summer.
 

·
E Pluribus Unum
Joined
·
140 Posts
Welcome to WI Adam. You'll find lots of winter clothing, snow suits, boots, etc for the little one at the thrift stores, just ask a local where the St. Vinny's is. You won't need anything fancy as she'll outgrow it before the next winter rolls around anyway. Just keep her warm and entertained and she'll be fine. Two seasons here, Snow Removal and Road Construction. :D: Again, welcome to the neighborhood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Welcome to WI Adam. You'll find lots of winter clothing, snow suits, boots, etc for the little one at the thrift stores, just ask a local where the St. Vinny's is. You won't need anything fancy as she'll outgrow it before the next winter rolls around anyway. Just keep her warm and entertained and she'll be fine. Two seasons here, Snow Removal and Road Construction. :D: Again, welcome to the neighborhood.

Actually I lived in WI my first 18 years of life. Im just returning. I also figured it be the perfect opportunity to learn, improve, and teach survival skills. Especaily during the fridged winters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Little ones need as normal as you can provide in the face of uncertainty.

this may mean their favorite blankie or stuffed animal, in this case most likely a doll. If you can get a soft body homemade dolly it makes it easier to stuff in a backpack or tied to her with a little baby carrier she wears on her front. Light weight is the key. Some clothes for baby doll too and don't forget a baby blanket. Little things that feel familiar to her.

books were mentioned and if you don't have any, do not forget to do a story time before bed... but that should be started now and continued on to again create as normal as you can life.

talk a lot about adventures. When you take her to the store... tell her we are going on a store adventure, or for a ride in the car.. we are going to Grandma's on an adventure. this way when you bug out.. it becomes an adventure. Even out in the snow to do anything... play... becomes a grand adventure.

bake cookies! put on aprons and bake cookies! even the store bought sugar cookies, the ones you cut and bake.. becomes an adventure in baking starting with the apron, the cookie dough and the bestest part... Sprinkles!!! sprinkles can be candy like M&M's! but the pretty colors the little ones like to sprinkle on and press in. It is only a little mess! but the apron is very important! this means we don't cook or do anything in the kitchen with out one. No apron (in the washer) no playing in the kitchen. Aprons -- I collect vintage apron patterns and sew them... is a memory she will never forget and will pass on to her grand children.

I love memory building in children. One summer when my last one was 3 (now 20), we went out and planted flower seeds in the garden. After she went to bed that night I ran out and planted flowers in garden .. those little 6 packs of johnny jump-ups. the next morning when she woke up she ran out to see if the flowers grew ... and sure enough there they were!

We build a fairy house out of a box and put glitter on it and glued curtains in the windows.. and all summer long she ran out to see if a fairy was there.

It is fun to see my sons doing the same or similar with their children... and so the memories continue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,827 Posts
I am moving to WI. Where it is winter almost half the year. It would be the first time my wife and daughter have been through a winter. I have a Survival kit in the works along with a BOB. I was wondering if there were any suggestions for being prepared to survive with a 2 year old. Anything I could or should add to my kit? She eats what we eat. Should I just double my blankets?
Just finished reading this. A man and his young son at the end of the world.

THE ROAD

By Cormac McCarthy.

241 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $24.
Featured Author
Cormac McCarthy


McCarthy has said that death is the major issue in the world and that writers who don’t address it are not serious. Death reaches very near totality in this novel. Billions of people have died, all animal and plant life, the birds of the air and the fishes of the sea are dead: “At the tide line a woven mat of weeds and the ribs of fishes in their millions stretching along the shore as far as eye could see like an isocline of death.” Forest fires are still being ignited (by lightning? other fires?) after what seems to be a decade since that early morning — 1:17 a.m., no day, month or year specified — when the sky opened with “a long shear of light and then a series of low concussions.” The survivors (not many) of the barbaric wars that followed the event wear masks against the perpetual cloud of soot in the air. Bloodcults are consuming one another. Cannibalism became a major enterprise after the food gave out. Deranged chanting became the music of the new age.

A man in his late 40’s and his son, about 10, both unnamed, are walking a desolated road. Perhaps it is the fall, but the soot has blocked out the sun, probably everywhere on the globe, and it is snowing, very cold, and getting colder. The man and boy cannot survive another winter and are heading to the Gulf Coast for warmth, on the road to a mountain pass — unnamed, but probably Lookout Mountain on the Tennessee-Georgia border. It is through the voice of the father that McCarthy delivers his vision of end times. The son, born after the sky opened, has no memory of the world that was. His father gave him lessons about it but then stopped: “He could not enkindle in the heart of the child what was ashes in his own.” The boy’s mother committed suicide rather than face starvation, rape and the cannibalizing of herself and the family, and she mocks her husband for going forward. But he is a man with a mission. When he shoots a thug who tries to murder the boy (their first spoken contact with another human in a year) he tells his son: “My job is to take care of you. I was appointed to do that by God. I will kill anyone who touches you.” And when he washes the thug’s brains out of his son’s hair he ruminates: “All of this like some ancient anointing. So be it. Evoke the forms. Where you’ve nothing else construct ceremonies out of the air and breathe upon them.” He strokes the boy’s head and thinks: “Golden chalice, good to house a god.”

McCarthy does not say how or when God entered this man’s being and his son’s, nor does he say how or why they were chosen to survive together for 10 years, to be among the last living creatures on the road. The man believes the world is finished and that he and the boy are “two hunted animals trembling like groundfoxes in their cover. Borrowed time and borrowed world and borrowed eyes with which to sorrow it.” But the man is a zealot, pushing himself and the boy to the edge of death to achieve their unspecified destination, persisting beyond will in a drive that is instinctual, or primordial, and bewildering to himself. But the tale is as biblical as it is ultimate, and the man implies that the end has happened through godly fanaticism. The world is in a nuclear winter, though that phrase is never used. The lone allusion to our long-prophesied holy war with its attendant nukes is when the man thinks: “On this road there are no godspoke men. They are gone and I am left and they have taken with them the world.”
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top