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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Needless to say, we are not preparing to bug out and live off the land. I just don't see that as a viable option. I'm preparing for a depression - so, therefore, I'm storing lots of food and other necessities of life.

However, in the event that we would have to make a hasty departure for somewhere else, I'm thinking of making a list of things my kids could take in a regular - but sturdy - backpack. What would you include?

4 pairs underwear
An extra pair of jeans
3 shirts
A sweater
Extra t-shirt and comfortable pair of shorts (can sleep in)
An extra pair of shoes
(Extra bra for older girl)
(Feminine products for older girl)
Protein bars

What would you pack?

ETA based on your suggestions:

Socks! (How could I forget that?)
Coat (plan on carrying to fit more in backpack)
One game per backpack (Multiple kids :) )
iPod (hey, we may have electricity to recharge)
Small New Testament and Psalms
Small, foldable rain poncho
 

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Young Blood
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a knife, a hatchet,matches,lighters,fire steel,rope or twine plus what you said
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think my eight year old girl is ready to carry a hatchet in her backpack! LOL

But thanks for the suggestion. And maybe this is a completely dumb question, but is a hatchet the same thing as an ax?
 

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I have a couple of rug rats myself and in addition to what you have I would add a comfort item, small stuffed animal or favorite action figure, maybe a favorite book or 2. some hard candy for the same reasons, a feeling of comfort/normality for the kiddos will make things easier on you and on them as well.

Nietz
 

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w/ Knowledge Comes Power
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I have 5 kids age 17,15,7,6,2. I would pack like Nietz said some thing that would comfort them one or two small toys. A couple of decks of cards, 2 books each that they can carry in there packs at least make sure they have a little swiss army knife. Gloves that fit. extra shoes, socks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
St. Germain, do you mind if I ask what your plans are with so many kids? I realize we can't give definitive answers, but what kind of plans are you making?

I'm also thinking of adding a foldable rain poncho.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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cards, crackers, socks--two or three extra pairs, a hat, jacket/coat and sunblock.
 

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Scarred for life...
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My kids are so hard to supply for.

My son has grown 6 pant sizes in less than 6 months. In July he wore a tight size 10 so I got him 14's. They fit him then, but now, just 5 months later I had to go get him some size 16's and they are snug. I already had to have my mother take them out an inch so hopefully they will last him to the end of the school year.

He had asthma and takes shots every month for that so I assume that has something to do with this growth spurt. At his last checkup he weighed 114 pounds and was 4% body fat. He just turned 12.
 

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BEEN HERE TO LONG
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never will you have enough socks
 

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Will let you beg for food
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I would also include moleskin because little feet wont be use to all the walking. DOnt forget you can hang a lot of stuff off of backpacks and the older kids can carry larger backpacks and carry a couple things for the little ones. My 6 yo can carry a hefty pack already and doesnt complain. I keep asking her if she is okay and she finally told me if i am tired I will tell lol. Only once did she give up...but it was full of books.
 

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I'm paranoid about my kids getting lost in a bad situation so they all have some items to attract attention - chemical light sticks, whistle, signal mirror and 1/2 watt UHF transceivers in little belt pouches.
 

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Hi,

I'm new. I also am prepping 5 dc for whatever may come. Any recommendations for a backpack for a teen? I just watched a video linked here and he panned a Kelty pack made for Academy Sports.
 

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New to this but committed to learning FAST. Crickett .22 cal rifles ( Walmart $108 per rifle), 50 rounds each child, binoculars, lighters, meds, gloves, water, security item for Kids ie blanket or stuffed animal etc., deck of cards,
favorite book, hope this helps.
 

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I bugged out before my son was born so he was raised in a self sufficient life style. He was driving the tractor by the time he was 7 and driving the farm truck by the time he was eight (the truck's pedals are farther away than the tractor pedals are). My boy could probably out-survive me in a wilderness situation as his summer fun is going out with his buddies and camping with nothing but the cloths on their backs. If started when young most kids do better than the parents in a survival situation. If they were raised where the thought process of surviving is fun then it will just be second nature to them.

My son asked for a meat grinder for Christmas this year because he hates having to wait to use mine when he's ready to butcher his deer. He's never been interested in toys. His friends love to come visit because of how many cool things he has, from his traps to his bobwhite he raises to his horses that he shows. The kid can harness up the horses to the wagon faster than his judges could at the fair.

I guess I would make them a part of the survival process just as soon as they can be a part of it. Ask them what they would take if they could only take one thing. Let them help in the kitchen. Let them help fill up the car or feed the dog. Yes, it is often harder to do when a child is "helping" but that is just part of being a parent. Teaching our children how to be a better person without us.

BLT
 

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infowars.com
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i got my boy his own bag and he carrys the same i do we made some stuff together like his hobo stove also we put together a first aid kit
are bags are pretty much the same
when we go camping he uses his own stuff as do i plus makeing most of it is good father son projects

I do this in the event of A SHTF situation and god forbid something happen to me atleast i would no he can survive he does a good job and he is ten right now i am going to go into more detail with him on map reading

but i honestly just treat him like on of the guys and teach him to pull his own weight
 

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I see you heading into a very dangerous situation. First of all, you and your (I think you said oldest) daughter need some form of protection and you both need to be well versed in it and ready to use it. I am not trying to bring up something to scare you, but it is a well know fact that when there is no significant sign of law and order (look at the LA riots and Hurricane Katrina just for starters) some people let those underlying tendencies overcome them. You are also charged with the protection of your young children, for their future lies in your hands.

The bottom filthy layer of society will do anything to survive and get what they want. This includes food, goods, and sex. Some stick together like rats and others will continue to don their sheep's clothing until the time to strike.

I agree that bugging out is a last option, but it's there is we need it. With a newborn and a 2 1/2 year old we'd be screwed.
 

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For those of us with little ones (under 5 or so) that don't weigh much, I HIGHLY recommend a sling of some sort. It will provide comfort for you and the child and is so much easier then having to keep up with a tired baby or trying to carry them on your hip unassisted.

Carrying infant inside shirt:

Emergency toddler carry in towel:

Emergency carry with sweat pants:

There are tons of videos on You Tube on how to carry a baby or toddler-how to make a sling from a bed sheet ... lots of valuable info.

My 2.5 yr old daughter still loves to be carried in a ruckstack style but we have a sling made just for that purpose. As a tiny infant (up to about 8 months) we carried her in a Moby Wrap, which is nothing more then 5 yards of t-shirt style material. http://www.mobywrap.com/t-mobywrap.aspx

Whilst this is hands free, someone else (older child or partner) will need to help carrying your supplies, or charge an older child with carrying a smaller one-as this way of toting a kid is surprisingly comfortable and easy to do.
 

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Well I am planning on sheltering in place-period. We won't ever be able to afford a bug out retreat. I am doing well on getting food stored up and brushing up on skills like canning, bread baking from self ground grains, heating the house with wood stove and cooking on it as well. I have clothes and shoes a couple sizes up from each kid. I have freecycled us into bikes and pull trailers so I could get around with all the kids if gasoline became scarce. The older kids have been enrolled in the local 4H shooting club that offers shotgun, rifle and archery training. Husband and I are also going to begin gun training and purchase/stockpiling. I am working for an exemption in my town to keep a few chickens in a chicken ark. If that doesn't work a gal who lives near but not in town may keep a few chickens for me and I pay her to keep them/share eggs. I have five local sources for meat/poultry/eggs/dairy/vegetables. I have been replacing my landscaping with edible fruit bushes. I have good relationships with all immediately surrounding neighbors and know which are the former military and policemen that I plan to go to immediately to develop a street protection/community. Hubby was smart and started saving silver coinage many years ago and we have barter items stocked up in storage. We won't ever have the type of supergear that survivalblog.com suggests we all have to have and can't live west of Mississipi River, but we won't be the first to die and we won't be victimized without taking a few with us.
 
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