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There are many wild edibles growing all around most of us. I eat at least something from the forest once a week. today while checking on black walnuts and persimmons I found a tree loaded with choke cherries . My point is ,learn what you can eat from a field or forest , free for the taking . it sure beats chasing a cow across the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
if you are walking down the road what are you going to have to trade that rancher for his cow? that is part of the reason no one that puts much thought into this realize you do not want to be trading with the "rancher" , you want to be trading with "Bill " who knows who you are from across a field that you helped stretch wire on a few years ago .. even being young /strong ,whatever ,, if its labor you are looking to trade its going to take a while to work off a cow
lol when i find things to eat in the wood /fields i try to get it growing around here,,lol and you are doing it wrong if you are chasing the cows ,,,grab a bucket toss in a hand full of gravel and rattle it
I have got several things growing around the house by collecting local seeds, plantain wild millet, groundnut and others.
 

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Shill for the Federal Gov
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It won't get to 5%, or even 50%, outside of a comet strike or Yellowstone erupting. There will be a massive die off inside the cities, but in the country, people will just have to wait for the die off and maybe tighten their belts a little. In one year, the wildlife will triple.

Four legged food. In one year, the wildlife will triple and fish will multiply by the trillions.
That has never happened ever. The first alive dingus Elk hunter with all of the stickers on his truck and all of his buds is going to shoot everything walking-crawling-flying-swimming within a week. Read about the depression, or, go to someplace like China, I have been there, a lot, and nothing besides people lives there
 

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Shill for the Federal Gov
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Only what I have learned form 68 years of hunting. Of which 39 years was as a Professional Alaska Registered Big Game Hunting Guide. Doing game population surveys from the air, for Alaska fish and Game.
And then there is the last 52 years of living in remote Alaska wilderness. Yes, I do write articles about wild animal behavior. But other then the above I am clueless about wildlife populations. But I know how many Grizzly Bears, are in my yard by looking out the window.

When you live in wilderness Alaska, there is zero shortage of fish and game. It is abundant, and most can be harvested by shooting from my cabin window, or dipping Salmon and Trout with a dip net from the stream.

I live at the mouth of a fresh water river, that is "boiling" and choked with Silver Salmon fighting to escape the ocean, and fight their way to the spawning grounds. The Beluga Whales are terrorizing them, and they escape by fighting their way up onto the beach to safety. Easy picking for the bears and myself.
We don't live in Alaska. Every single edible anything is going to be gone inside of a week in most of the lower 48. Including all animals. Its happened before in circumstances less extreme than what is being postulated here, like the depression, or, just life before local governments and hunters org's made rules to stop harvesting everything.
 

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That has never happened ever. The first alive dingus Elk hunter with all of the stickers on his truck and all of his buds is going to shoot everything walking-crawling-flying-swimming within a week. Read about the depression, or, go to someplace like China, I have been there, a lot, and nothing besides people lives there
My parents lived through the depression. I know enough to know you are 100% wrong.
 

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Gumpherhooberpelt
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From history, we know that there are three incompatible forms of lifestyle :
__ Hunter / gatherers (uses the most land)
__ Nomadic herdsmen (uses less land, generally not good for agriculture)
__ Settled farmers (uses the least land to support the most people)

Post SHTF, if you cannot get up to speed with agriculture, your options shrink. And for those who think they'll just forage the wilderness, the Dept of Interior estimated that it takes approx. 10 square miles per person to sustain a hunter / gatherer. American Indians were nomadic for good reason. They "hunted out" their lands quite rapidly, and had to move on. And that fueled the incessant conflict with neighboring tribes, defending one's hunting lands or expanding them.

Ironically, the current paradigm of American family farming is not sustainable, and is the reason why so many sold out to corporate agribusiness. If we take a glance at other farmers around the world, they tended to live in villages and commuted to their fields. This is very wise. For if a family farmer can't or won't farm, he's kaput. But a village based farmer can find help or do other occupations if he can't farm anymore.

If one "knew" that the SHTF was five years away, I'd advise forming a cooperative, buy the biggest chunk of arable land that you can, and construct a fortified village within the boundaries. Those who want to farm, go farm, but store your harvests, etc, within the walls of your fortified village. A nice 4 or 5 story dual ring village would stop a lot of opportunistic predators as well as be disaster resistant.

Height Comparisons
Five story Ring Wall - 50 ft.
Tallest Fujian Tulou - 49 ft.
Four story Ring Wall - 40 ft.
Walls of Constantinople - 39 ft.
Great Wall of China - 16 to 26 ft.

The highest documented storm surge in the U.S. occurred in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina, when Pass Christian, MS, recorded a 27.8 foot (8.47 m) storm surge above mean sea level.
 

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within a few months, 95% of people will be dead and there will be no way to recover, not enough people to run the system.

So, storing more food might only delay your slow death.

Unless you have the resources to go all out, farmland, major solar setup,a few yEars food storage etc, it will likely do you no good having food beyond 6 months.
Remember, that's the worst case scenario, and many other outcomes are possible. 6 months of food will see you alive and 95% of your competition for food dead. That's a good head start i would think. Now imagine you have a years worth on hand, with supplemental food from other sources after the first 6 months you could stretch that to one and a half or two years. Humans are very resilient creatures if they put their mind to it.
 

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How about investing in a book named The Forager's Guide to wild Foods by Nicole Apelian PH.D. This book has well over 400 wild foods listed in it including edible and medical parts of all of these plants. Example Purslane, Portulaca variety grows all over the united states. And is even in most families yards. Most people see it as a weed. Tastes good. We have it show up every year in our yard here in the Reno NV. area. We pick it then wash it. We have cooked it up in a skillet with onions bell peppers and mushrooms. We have also added it to our salads. Or how about the winged seeds from the maple tree. Or cutting into a maple tree for the sap. After all this is where maple syrup comes from. Or the birch tree for a water supplement when water is not available. This an excellent book with color photos. This book was written by someone who has lived off of these plants in the wilds.
 

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The big difference IMHO is most folks today do not know how to do anything except go to the store for food . Do not know how to process meat safely. Grow and or forage for food. If one can hold the fort for 90 days - 2 years. Your odds will increase. Now others who survive that long without any preparations will be hardened and either Allie's or opponents worthy of respect.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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Well i dunno about their experience BUT game populations did decline heavily during the early 1900 and that decline lasted through the depression era. A lot of this may have been from commercial hunting however.
If you live far from humans you have very little competition for game. Or the fish.
I keep saying over and over that when you reduce this serious long term SHTF situation down, humans are the biggest problem.
Humans have a fatal attraction to spending their live near other humans. Zero "Corona Virus" cases where I live. Humans are the carriers of most sicknesses, that infect other humans. I have not had a cold or flu in 37 years.
You want to "Live off the massive bounty of fish and game", get far from other humans.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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At this point, it's unclear as to what is about to happen but I have a strong sense that something IS about to happen. Collapse of the dollar? Nationwide union strikes? Civil war? Democrat-style martial law? Foreign invasion by UN Forces or China or both? Some major, natural disaster? All the above? Nobody can say for sure.

But what I CAN say for sure is that folks had better start doing everything they can to prepare for hard times (whatever the cause). As someone mentioned earlier, buy just a few extra cans of soup or other food items. Buy an extra container or two of water. Do the most you can with what you've got. But don't wait until the last minute when it's too late.
Planet X-Nibiru
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
How about investing in a book named The Forager's Guide to wild Foods by Nicole Apelian PH.D. This book has well over 400 wild foods listed in it including edible and medical parts of all of these plants. Example Purslane, Portulaca variety grows all over the united states. And is even in most families yards. Most people see it as a weed. Tastes good. We have it show up every year in our yard here in the Reno NV. area. We pick it then wash it. We have cooked it up in a skillet with onions bell peppers and mushrooms. We have also added it to our salads. Or how about the winged seeds from the maple tree. Or cutting into a maple tree for the sap. After all this is where maple syrup comes from. Or the birch tree for a water supplement when water is not available. This an excellent book with color photos. This book was written by someone who has lived off of these plants in the wilds.
I have wild ma'am Steve grilled book on the subject. I know everything around here that is eatable.
 

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Survivor
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How about investing in a book named The Forager's Guide to wild Foods by Nicole Apelian PH.D. This book has well over 400 wild foods listed in it including edible and medical parts of all of these plants. Example Purslane, Portulaca variety grows all over the united states. And is even in most families yards. Most people see it as a weed. Tastes good. We have it show up every year in our yard here in the Reno NV. area. We pick it then wash it. We have cooked it up in a skillet with onions bell peppers and mushrooms. We have also added it to our salads. Or how about the winged seeds from the maple tree. Or cutting into a maple tree for the sap. After all this is where maple syrup comes from. Or the birch tree for a water supplement when water is not available. This an excellent book with color photos. This book was written by someone who has lived off of these plants in the wilds.
One problem that most overlook is the quality of the land, considering we've been paying to poison the earth. Need to know what "healthy" plants look like, The books will help!
 

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Survivor
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From history, we know that there are three incompatible forms of lifestyle :
__ Hunter / gatherers (uses the most land)
__ Nomadic herdsmen (uses less land, generally not good for agriculture)
__ Settled farmers (uses the least land to support the most people)

Post SHTF, if you cannot get up to speed with agriculture, your options shrink. And for those who think they'll just forage the wilderness, the Dept of Interior estimated that it takes approx. 10 square miles per person to sustain a hunter / gatherer. American Indians were nomadic for good reason. They "hunted out" their lands quite rapidly, and had to move on. And that fueled the incessant conflict with neighboring tribes, defending one's hunting lands or expanding them.

Ironically, the current paradigm of American family farming is not sustainable, and is the reason why so many sold out to corporate agribusiness. If we take a glance at other farmers around the world, they tended to live in villages and commuted to their fields. This is very wise. For if a family farmer can't or won't farm, he's kaput. But a village based farmer can find help or do other occupations if he can't farm anymore.

If one "knew" that the SHTF was five years away, I'd advise forming a cooperative, buy the biggest chunk of arable land that you can, and construct a fortified village within the boundaries. Those who want to farm, go farm, but store your harvests, etc, within the walls of your fortified village. A nice 4 or 5 story dual ring village would stop a lot of opportunistic predators as well as be disaster resistant.

Height Comparisons
Five story Ring Wall - 50 ft.
Tallest Fujian Tulou - 49 ft.
Four story Ring Wall - 40 ft.
Walls of Constantinople - 39 ft.
Great Wall of China - 16 to 26 ft.

The highest documented storm surge in the U.S. occurred in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina, when Pass Christian, MS, recorded a 27.8 foot (8.47 m) storm surge above mean sea level.
Good presentation, though I don't think we have 5 years and then of course there is the matter of who you may trust. We've done a pretty poor job of trusting many of the politicians placed in powerful positions to date.
 

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Gumpherhooberpelt
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5,503 Posts
95% of people will be dead and there will be no way to recover, not enough people to run the system.
So, storing more food might only delay your slow death.
Food Cache is always better than paper cash, post SHTF.
("Alas Babylon" had a great scene about that situation. The local grocer was sitting on the steps of his emptied store, with a huge pile of cash, and laughed that since no resupply was ever coming, the money was worthless paper.)
. . .
As for the depletion of population, that's easily remedied.

* For a 95% drop in population *
* How long does it take to return to current population *
* When population doubles every 50 years *
A wee bit over two centuries.
. . . .
For 1/20 to 1.0
Population growth factor = 20
50 yr doubling rate = 0.01386 factor
Time = (log 20)/(log 1.01386)
217.6 years
(1.01386^217.6)=20; checks
. . . .
THANOS couldn't do the math, apparently...
 
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