Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Livin' off the land
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently just bought the Survival Seed Bank, at Survivalseedbank.com. it has all the food i'll ever need in a disaster. Anyways, The problem is, what if a disaster happens in the winter? will i still be able to plant these seeds? If not, what do i do? and when can i plant them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
I assume you are in the northern parts. You can start them indoors in containers or seed beds in a closed in porch or breezeway or greenhouse and then transplant them.

That's the problem I have been wrestling with - what happens if the SHTF in the Fall or winter, how do I find enough food to last until the garden produces and further what happens if my garden fails as I am a novice gardener
 

·
Livin' off the land
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The type of disaster im talking about isn't hurricanes, tornados, floods, or really any natural disaster. Im talking an apocolypse, government clapse, civil disorder, Nuclear Biological Chemical (NBC).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,956 Posts
The huge question is.... WHERE do you live? You asked if you could still plant them in the Winter. Well.... if you live in S. California or TX then Yes... but not in snow country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
Wow, dilligaf,

Thanks for posting the Disaster Garden blog. That was beyond excellent.

I was going to plan for and try a small test garden for next spring. I can see that even for that I have a lot of work to do.
 

·
RH-O Negative
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
Earlier this year I took a tiller and various garden tools to my future garden spot and began work on the virgin soil. I got my butt kicked several times over the next several days and finally got my seeds into the ground.

Over the next several months I went out there to water and weed and the garden took my hoe from me on most days and gave me a hard imaginary whack over my back and sent me inside for a "time out".

I haven't given up on it but it is correct that gardening isn't easy and there has to be a tremendous amount of time and planning that has to be invested for a successful garden.

I will probably have the garden whip my butt a few more times before I am successful, but successful I will be someday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
That must be some garden to whip a master sergeant's butt. :D:

Mine is going to be virgin soil too. We'll see if it whips a Captain's butt. It probably will because this one is old, tired and retired (but I am still working).
 

·
RH-O Negative
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
That must be some garden to whip a master sergeant's butt. :D:

Mine is going to be virgin soil too. We'll see if it whips a Captain's butt. It probably will because this one is old, tired and retired (but I am still working).
It makes me feel better to think of it the way the Army does. It really isn't retreating it is retrograde.

Good luck with your garden Captain and call in reinforcements early, if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
I don't think the picture of our gardens kicking us in our butts would be a pretty picture for either of us. Fortunately I have a hammock slung nearby my garden. Carry on.
 

·
population control
Joined
·
67 Posts
The Survival Seed Bank is a HUGE ripoff!!! You should have done some research before buying that thing.
I agree whole heartedly. You would be better off buying the proper seed of plants that do best for your area of operation. Another plus is to MAKE SURE your seeds are what is known as heirloom. This mean the seed your non cropped plants produce (you did make sure to get enough seed banks to have some plants left over to go to seed right?) non mutated seed which will produce non mutated plants.
I also noticed this seed bank doesn't have very many root crops. Root crops are vital to you winter survival. They do the best in root cellars and similar settings. And on that note I hope you know a good deal about canning and food preservation. I would cut the loss with the seed bank and go do some major research then hit up a reputable company for the seeds that will do you best.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,208 Posts
I do a lot of gardening.

We moved into a forest in 2005, and while building a house we have been trying to produce all of our own food.

It is hard. Each year we have had failures.

Not every veggie will grow everywhere, and it takes practice.

I would never trust that a bag of seed will provide you food, without first building a garden and finding out which varieties will produce in yoru location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
Did you find that the University of Maine Cooperative Extension or their publications (found at the link below) on what plants grow in Maine and how to grow them were helpful, or are they FOS compared to real farmers?

http://extensionpubs.umext.maine.edu/ePOS?this_category=67&store=413&listtype=begin&form=shared3%2fgm%2fmain.html&design=413&__session_info__=z5IgwC5ScYcFuY5DOSSR4XcCcrT9%2f7qxEjRd7TtiK4113JEdXXYGMW7kKOlN6bDLJjaJSuwN2oNapzzSctSRAkOKH3%2brVHfM

My unheated cottage is located on the Maine mid-coast so I may have more latitude on what will grow than you do.

I wanted to start prepping for a garden this Fall to plant next Spring, but ran out of time and energy before we closed up for the winter. There were too many roots and rocks to deal with, plus I have too many pine trees so I am going to have to condition the soil. I think I may start with just a raised bed or two as I have a lot of learning to do.

Since I ran out of time in Maine I ended up planting my Jerusalem artichokes down in Massachusetts so I did make a very modest start this Fall.

I used to have low blueberry bushes and want to try to get them to come back or to get high ones to grow. Also raspberries and an apple tree or two. The ME Co-op Extension recommended what apple trees grow well in Maine but I am not familiar with all the varieties they listed.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,208 Posts
Did you find that the University of Maine Cooperative Extension or their publications (found at the link below) on what plants grow in Maine and how to grow them were helpful, or are they FOS compared to real farmers?
I walked into their office, saw a large assortment of pubs, but they stopped me and wanted cash to take any of them.

When I tried to speak with the Ext office folks about farming in Maine, they really did not know anything, mostly they seemed to be receptionist / office workers.

I get far more good information at MOFGA.

We have raised beds for everything.

Also the scion exchange is a great place to meet and talk with apple folks.

We have a lot of buried logs. 40' to 50 foot long trees that were laid on the ground as supports so huge crawlers could pass over them to harvest the forest. today they rest a foot to 2 foot underground. They do not rot.

I destroyed one Sears Rototiller transmission, the one part that is not covered by their warrantee. And I bought another one. But now I rarely use it. so many rocks, so many huge logs, and even being the biggest tiller available, why destroy it?

Then the wet soil, standing water, ugh. It can be sunny for a week, but one day of rain and our entire garden will be under 3 inches of water. And it takes 4 days to go down again. 2 years ago, we had a weekly rain storm. Just as dry ground appeared, it rained again.

This past year we shifted entirely to raised beds and planters for our garden.

I planted our apple trees in raised beds due to the high moisture in our forest.

I selected our apple trees first by harvest season; one group of trees that ripens mid-fall, and a second group that ripens in late fall to early winter.

Secondly we selected one variety in each group that produces an apple known for high sugar content, and two varieties noted for tart or acid content.

Our hope being to spread out the harvest a bit, so as not to over-load us with apples all at once.

And also to provide two different blends of apple juices for fermenting.

Following is the list of what apple trees we are planting. The number of trees, and then a description of their fruit.

We avoided all of the summer varieties, and tried to avoid having all apples coming into harvest all at once.

4- 'Sweet 16 Apples': harvested Early Fall.
Whenever anyone eats a Sweet 16 for the first time, you know they will be surprised. Fine-textured crisp flesh contains an astounding unusually complex combination of sweet nutty and spicy flavors with slight anise essence, sometimes described as cherry, vanilla or even bourbon. Truly excellent fresh eating, although it is too sweet for some pallets. Round-conic bronze-red medium-sized fruit, striped and washed with rose-red.

2- 'Prima Apples': harvested Fall.
Medium-large roundish fruit has rich yellow skin with a striking orange-red blush. Mildly subacid juicy white flesh provides excellent eating and makes good cider. Keeps a couple of months.

4- 'Minnesota 447 apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Developed at the University of Minnesota before 1936, but never introduced. This massively flavored dessert apple—not for the faint of heart—provides a whole new level of culinary experience. Likely the most distinctive and unusual apple I’ve ever tried. Astonished friends have described its flavor as strange, molasses, olives, fabulous, sweet, complex and sugar cane. The roundish fruit is medium-sized and entirely covered with dark bluish-purple stripes. The aromatic crisp crystalline flesh is an apricot-orange color with occasional red staining, so juicy it’ll run down your hand. Years ago David Bedford of the University of Minnesota said they would never release it because it didn’t taste like an apple. Joyfully they changed their minds.

2- 'Cortland Apples': harvested Fall-Winter
Medium to medium-large slightly ribbed dull red fruit with a purple blush. Excellent eating and cooking. Slow-oxidizing white flesh is very good in salads; fine-grained, crisp, tender, juicy. Produces a surprisingly delightful cider, fresh or fermented, in a mix or even on its own. Vigorous tall upright spreading tree with reddish bark. Annual producer of heavy crops.

2- 'Esopus Spitzenburg apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Without peer in flavor and quality. A choice dessert and culinary apple, mentioned in nearly every list of best-flavored varieties. Slightly subacid, crisp and juicy. Famous for being Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple. Medium-large bright-red round to mostly conic fruit, covered with russet dots. Excellent acid source for sweet or fermented cider.
Bears moderate crops.

2- 'Golden Russet apples': harvested Winter
The champagne of cider apples, ripening late in fall, when the root cellar has finally cooled off and the best cider is ready to be made: sweet, balanced, thick and smooth. Also recommended as a “sharp” acid source for fermented cider. Excellent eating; keeps all winter and well into spring. Round medium-sized hard fruit; uniform in size and shape, softens as winter progresses but maintains its superior sweet flavor. Solid deep yellow golden russeted skin!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
getting the seed is just one of the many steps in haveing a garden. you need all the supplies,books, tools,pestisides,fetilizers/compost..ect there is ALOT more to it than just throwing seeds on the ground and adding water. yes the plant might grow but is it going to produce a bountiful harvest?or just one small veggie?

i would get a how to grandening book as well as the book," seed to seed,"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
Thanks ForestBeekeeper for the MOFGA and apple variety tips. I have saved your comments for future reference.

I see MOGFA is having a seed swap and scion exchange in Unity on March 27th. I am not sure that will work for me for this year and there is no way I could get root stock planted before then. The ground will still be frozen and probably covered with snow.

You can download many of the ME Co-op publications for free. They just charge for the paper copies. Some are not available for download.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top