Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In a long term survival situation, your boots/shoes are worn out or need repair.
You have a good supply of leather or raw hide made by you or obtained through barter.
Here some basics on what to do.


Once you become skilled at it, different clothing items can be made, slings, shoulder bags, strapping and so on.
Leather items can also be use as a barter item.
 

·
not a nut
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Those were great videos.
I still have some leather and some buckskin hide from when I was repairing/refinishing antiques.
I think shoes soles would be a bit difficult to make,
an old tire might be easier to use.
I know they wouldn't be as pretty but I think I could make up a pair if I had to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
If your interested in leather i would google Tandy leather factory they seem to have a rather nice selection on supplies and tools for leather crafting (used to be a hobby) anyways not sure about price there however they are American if that counts for anything and know their stuff.
 

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thought about old tyres for soles on boots, and tried to find some information but no luck so far.
Believe the Asians were very good at using this material particularly during the Vietnam war.
Perhaps another material that could be used with a lot of skill is wood. No doubt different types of wood are best suited, but the Dutch have made wooden clogs for a long time.
 

·
I love this *****
Joined
·
33,879 Posts
Very nice videos. I would like to learn how to tan leather in the field. I would like to be able to use deer or elk hide should the need arise but it has to be tanned first. I doubt very much that I will be able to carry tanning chemicals with me into the wilderness should I need to take that route. How did the Indians tan their leather?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Thedragon

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
From what I know and not much on the subject of tanning so far, the skin were pegged out on the ground.
Then the fat and sinew were scaped of with something like a bone or wooden scraper.
These were then sun dried till it was very stiff, then roled and worked by rubbing in wood ash and I think the animal brain material. I think in some indigenous societies they may have used plant saps or oils as well.
But not real sure yet on this.
 

·
Watchin tha world go by
Joined
·
8,151 Posts
Thought about old tyres for soles on boots, and tried to find some information but no luck so far.
Believe the Asians were very good at using this material particularly during the Vietnam war.
Perhaps another material that could be used with a lot of skill is wood. No doubt different types of wood are best suited, but the Dutch have made wooden clogs for a long time.
Cong sandals
--- materiels needed - a blown out or worn out tire
---tools needed - knife or bayonet
 
  • Like
Reactions: Thedragon

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Here are some videos on how to prepare animal skins to make buck skins and leather.

 

·
Backpacker I Adventurer
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Okay seriously that Bucksin Playgirl was disturbing.....and yet I so wanna join in.
 

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
LOLOL
Yep I reckon so.
There were other references on this subject but couldn't edit them for the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
This may seem kind of disgusting but I often see Road kill and wonder about skinning and tanning their hides. I have seen a bunch of smaller animals and even a few deer and a bear. Is there any difference in their pelts, due to the nature of their death, that would make it difficult to skin and tan them? Do you have to begin the skinning and tanning process within a small window of time?
 

·
Semper non compos mentis
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Brain-tanning a Fox Skin

Very nice videos. I would like to learn how to tan leather in the field. I would like to be able to use deer or elk hide should the need arise but it has to be tanned first. I doubt very much that I will be able to carry tanning chemicals with me into the wilderness should I need to take that route. How did the Indians tan their leather?
Hi AJ and Sticks, here's a little how-to pdf file I lifted from the Primitiveways web site. It shows the full process of brain-tanning a fox skin (in a backyard in California).

http://www.survivalistboards.com/downloads.php?do=file&id=794

Cheers, Herne
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top