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Emergency Kits
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Discussion Starter #1
1)Blankets
2)Water
3)Food items
4)First aid kit
5)Dried fruits
6)Pocket knife
7)3 12-hour light sticks
8)Batteries
9)2 rolls toilet paper
10)Radio
11)Several boxes of matches
12)Container to store survival kit
 

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Hunter-gatherer
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Rope! Lots of rope. Or at least a good length of it.
A handful of Bic lighters is a good idea too.
A lantern and a small cooking stove. And fuel for both.
Dishes/eating utensils, like a pan and pot, bowl, plate, cup.
I've got all these things and more neatly packed into 2 medium-sized totes with lids. Plus, I keep 10 gallons of water per person in the house. You don't know how long you may have to stay there.
 

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Turn off your water and gas lines coming into the house.. and electric... Your water tank has about 40 gals water you could use after the fact...
 

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The same thing i use in a hurricane, tornadoe, earthquake, zombie outbreak, alien invasion, Mexican invasion II and so on and so on.. It will be the same kit.
 

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Turn off your water and gas lines coming into the house.. and electric... Your water tank has about 40 gals water you could use after the fact...
Good idea. But for those of us in a apartment and has never messed with a water tank/heater, how would you go about getting it out ? :confused:
 

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I gave silver coins and earthquake kits for christmas this year and got chuckles. I don't think they are laughing now.

The 3 day lite kits from emergency essentials are decent and affordable for $29 (I paid $25 at christmas). It has the basics for 3 days and includes a nice backpack. You could add a small radio, real food (it has one of those lifeboat ration bricks), and other items and still come in around $50-60. I still would get enough supplies for a week or 2.
 

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Hunter-gatherer
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Run the bathtub.
Most apartments have the water tanks in the basement so running the faucet to fill the tub won't work. You'd just have to be the first one down there with a few jugs and start filling. Most water heaters have a spigot near the bottom, or a pressure-relief-valve that works the same way.

I would make it a point to figure all these things out ASAP. That way if you ever need it you know exactly what to do the instant you think to start doing it. I.e., what size jug will fit under spigot/valve, what tool(s) if any, do you need to turn off the gas, etc.
 

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Banned
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I think what you guys are describing is more like a BOB, or bug in stash. I live in CA and have made several "earthquake survival packs." Using the triangle of life strategy I have them stashed around various places (under furniture, beds, etc) in my home. They contain:

2X 12 oz water bottles
1 tournequet
1 lg. combat bandage
quickclot
Evacu-8 smoke hood w/ 10 min. supply of oxygen.
one sm maglight with xtra batteries
one small am/fm radio with ear bud
asprin/ibuprofen/immodium AD
1 small motorola 2 way radio
one whistle
2 power bars
two steel chisels (they make a loud metallic sound when struck together)
one laminated morse code card

When the shaking starts simply find the nearest TOL location like next to a bed, next to the couch, etc. grab your bag and hold on. If your building comes down and you are lucky enough to be in a dead space you have enough stuff on your person to 1.) stay hydrated 2.) stop most types of bleeding 3.) communicate with outside world. 4.)signal your position 5.) understand what is happening around you. 6.) stay alive until rescue.

The immodium AD is to stop sh*tting. NObody wants to lie around in that stuff while you wait to get dug out. LOL

Hope this helps.
 

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Apprentice Geezer
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7)3 12-hour light sticks - Useless toys in my experience, but pack 'em if you want.
11)Several boxes of matches - better to have a few and a BIC lighter or 2
12)Container to store survival kit - Preferably carry-able (like a back pack/bugout bag)

gloves - for moving debris - Leather work gloves, should be part of the vehicle kit.
dust mask - go for the respirators that are at least semi effective against disease, should be part of the vehicle kit.
first aid kit should include items for wounds and breaks - Like battle dressings with coagulant/blood stop and SAM splints etc. (should already be in your vehicle kit)

NukeAlert radiation detector - Plan ahead and don't live down wind from a nuclear installation.

2X 12 oz water bottles - Minimum in the bag a couple of cases stored.
1 tourniquet - would be most useful if you can get the victim to medical support; unlikely after an earthquake.
1 lg. combat bandage - (Minimum, preferably with quick clot or other coagulant).
quickclot - YES
Evacu-8 smoke hood w/ 10 min. supply of oxygen. - might be useful
one sm maglight with extra batteries - any light should be LED they give much more usefull light on a set of batteries (many lights are excessively bright and don't have much useful life - my lights have a minimum run time of 16 continuous hours, up to 3 weeks of intermittent use).
one small am/fm radio with ear bud - Yes, I also use rechargeable batteries (same as the pocket flashlight) and have a small solar charger in the BO bag.
aspirin/ibuprofen/immodium AD - yes
1 small Motorola 2 way radio - Optional
one whistle - Yes
2 power bars - minimum, a dozen in a belt carry-able munchie bag will keep you happier longer.
two steel chisels (they make a loud metallic sound when struck together) - how about a chisel and a drilling hammer? (should be in the vehicle tools)
one laminated Morse code card - waste of time, if you actually believe it will be handy learn Morse code.

Some suggestions;
Don't plan to be a victim; plan ahead to not be a victim.
Be aware, in earthquake zones don't put yourself in a position to be trapped, living in such places or is short sighted at best (IMO).
Keep tools and a BO bag in the vehicle parked where it can be extracted by hand.

Vehicle tools (minimum);
hydraulic jack,
cold chisel (not Chinese junk),
wrenches, screw drivers and socket set,
E-tool (not Chinese junk),
Mini pick mattock (not Chinese junk),
hi-lift jack - optional (not Chinese junk),
medium to large wrecking bar or pry bar,
2 to 2 1/2 pound hammer,
optional-winch and accessories,
Critical first aid supplies/vehicle first aid kit; in an ammo can (waterproof),
Svensaw (can cut 2 bys and 4 bys etc. for cribbing (it will mostly get used for firewood while camping),
toilet paper in a water resistant container,
tarp (for expedient stretcher, shelter etc).

Throw a couple of cans of Spam in the BO bag along with some dried pasta (spaghetti takes the least space for the weight).
Keep a GI canteen (with a cup in a nasty looking cover with a spoon) filled with water, in the vehicle, refresh it monthly.
consider a high quality water filter (Katadyn) backed up with some iodine water purification tabs.

I do all of this and more, and never expect to be in a destructive earthquake; its part of general preparedness.

Enjoy!
 

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Happy Joe all good points but two things are clear - living in CO you never experienced an earthquake of any magnitude, and I'm not talking about a survival kit for what to do if you're up and walking around after the quake. I'm talking about what you might need if you are trapped in the rubble.

I've been through several large quakes in CA and you are right - I'm an idiot for living here, but so is the rest of the State.....oh well. That said, when a quake big enough to ruin your house hits - you don't have the time to do anything but dive for the nearest triangle-of-life. Doorways, under desks, etc have all proven to be fatal. It's seconds, not minutes.

Just a couple of quick clarifications:

The tourniquet is for you, not others: intended a compound fracture that hits a major artery, or the loss of a limb.

The Evacu-8 is to help with a fire situation that sucks oxygen from where ever it is you may be trapped.

The Motorola is not optional. Phones will be down. Radios will be up. If you're buried under two stories of house, it may be the only way your going to have to let someone know your around. After that it's the morse code. Worthless to you maybe, but a life saver to someone who has no other way to communicate with would-be rescuers. The card is intended for non-survivalist types.

This pack is not intended for long term use. It's small enough to be velcroed under tables and beds, next to counters, etc.. This is to get you through 48 hours buried under god knows what, if you're lucky enough to find yourself there. I think you misunderstood where I was coming from.

But thanks.
 
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