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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am trying to decide which knife I want.
Which I'll use for heavy duty work such as hacking branches and possibly a solid pummel suitable for hammering/smashing glass etc.
Cutting rope (serrated needed)

Also possibly a handle with glass. You know the ones that are electronically isolated so you can safely use to cut potentially live wires.

I am trying to decide which steel to go for also.
According toy research 1095 is easy to sharpen and holds an edge well.
However has corrosion problems requires honing and oiling.
Apparently this steel will get a sharper edge
440c holds an edge extremely well but is hard to sharpen, slightly more corrosion resistant.
Apparently a diamond type sharpener will be required.
420 HC seems to be a good balance. Moderately easy to sharpen. Corrosion resistant holds, an edge quite well.

Well from the face of it 420 HC seems to make a better camping knife. Because of its corrosion resistance and all round good qualities.
But most people seem to think either 1095 or 440c are better.

Ok i really like the Gerber lmf 2 infantry knife.
Which is 420hc
On the other hand kabar does some beautiful 1095 partially serrated or back serrated blades.

Do I really need an expensive knife?
Because us made ONTARIO 8680 sp2 is 1095 steel is only about 50 dollars. But looks beautiful. Similar to kabar. With a saw back and double finger guard. Full tang. Looks like a really good handle with a good grip.
any thoughts on this knife?

Do I really need to pay more, if it's got the right steel, full tang a good handle finger guard etc.

Seems on these boards people turn their noses up at anything under 200 bucks !
 

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With the 3 choices you’ve given, I’d take the 1095.

I think people talk about the “oiling” way too much. I have several knives in this steel and never do anything more than wash and dry them. They form a patina. I like it.
It is true that if you store the knives for a few months they will start to lose the razor edge. It takes me about 20 seconds on a stone to bring it back.
With 1095 you get a razor edge that stays sharp for a surprising amount of time and is very easy to sharpen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With the 3 choices you’ve given, I’d take the 1095.

I think people talk about the “oiling” way too much. I have several knives in this steel and never do anything more than wash and dry them. They form a patina. I like it.
It is true that if you store the knives for a few months they will start to lose the razor edge. It takes me about 20 seconds on a stone to bring it back.
With 1095 you get a razor edge that stays sharp for a surprising amount of time and is very easy to sharpen.
Thanks for the feedback.
And which sharpener do you use. Bearing in mind I haven't got any experience with that. I usually use cheap knives until they go dull then replace.
I have a Japanese whet stone but I don't know if I'm consistently Holding the same angle.

What about the Ontario blade I mentioned with that steel. Have you come across it?

Thanks
 

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Ontario Knife Company OKC-3S Marine Corps bayonet. Great bayonet, of course, but also selected by the Marine Corps since it is also an excellent fighting knife as well as general utility knife. It is my primary sheath knife.

Ontario Knife OKC 3S Bayonet, 6504 at Ontario-Knife-Store.com

Definitely shop around, and watch out for shipping costs.

Just my opinion.
 

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Thanks for the feedback.
And which sharpener do you use. Bearing in mind I haven't got any experience with that.

What about the Ontario blade I mentioned with that steel. Have you come across it?
For someone with no experience sharpening knives, my suggestion is always to buy a Lansky sharpening system. The price is reasonable and if you take your time you can’t mess it up. It’s almost foolproof.

Then take those old knives and start learning to use a regular stone.

I can’t help with the Ontario. I’ve never owned one. I’ve heard good things about the company though.
 

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I am trying to decide which knife I want.
Which I'll use for heavy duty work such as hacking branches and possibly a solid pummel suitable for hammering/smashing glass etc.
Cutting rope (serrated needed)

Also possibly a handle with glass. You know the ones that are electronically isolated so you can safely use to cut potentially live wires.

Do I really need to pay more, if it's got the right steel, full tang a good handle finger guard etc.

Seems on these boards people turn their noses up at anything under 200 bucks !
First, I do own several knives in this category over $200, but I also own some well under that amount. I would be less concerned about the actual steel used and more about the reputation of the company/maker and the heat treatment. Becker Knives (from Ka-Bar) is also another good option to consider. I have a few of Ontario's larger knives and they are well built and robust. I don't have, but handled the Gerber LMF, and it's a solid knife for the money.

Given your choices, I would strongly consider the Gerber LMF; pair it with a small folding saw and you'll have a very versatile system. Gerber has come a long way with their steel and heat treatment and that 420HC is really quite good as well. I have several dozens in this category with various steels. I've never had an issue maintaining a high-carbon steel like O1, A2, 1065, 1095, etc. If you actually use your knife frequently and simply do basic maintenance and field sharpening, carbon steels are only a concern if you're going to be in and around salt water for extended periods. Even my high-end "stainless" steels have had surface rust at certain points; rust is cosmetic for the most part as long as you take time to clean it up and not store it in that condition for long periods.

I'm not a huge advocate of serrations on my main fixed blade; just personal preference. If I think I need serrations, I would just have a small folder with a serrated blade for those uses. While it's true, the 3/4 tang of the Gerber will insulate your hand if your blade hits a hot electrical line, chances are it will damage your blade...but that was the original design feature for air crewmen.

ROCK6
 

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If you are going to cut live wires, separate the wires first. Cut each individual strand by itself.
Better yet...use a hatchet or axe.
 

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I do second the idea 420 is a superior chopping steel to everything else. It combines the ease of sharpening of Carbon, the edge holding of 440 and the stainless resistance to rust of... Well the best stainless!

It actually has superior edge holding when chopping, because the apex blunts earlier at the microscopic level, so you don’t have a folded-over apex that bends the edge hit after hit: You have a more sound apex wearing pattern that stays straight to the orientation of your hits, and requires less metal removal to sharpen than a bent or broken apex. The apex stays straight and becomes stronger with wear: Exactly what you want in a chopper. That 420J is looked down on is just an indication of how non-scientific the knife industry is... They think using steels meant for industrial tools is what will work with knives... The result is CPM steels which imho are the worst steels ever devised for serious knife use: Hard to sharpen, unstable apexes, weak structure, the worst being S30V, a steel supposedly specifically formulated for knives... CPM 3V is only slightly better, CPM 154 somewhere in the middle. INFI is hardly any better at thin angles, but the apex does stay straight: It’s the whole edge that wobbles in chops on Maple when anywhere near thin enough to slice meat. They get away with it by having the public tolerate massively thick edges.
 

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Like others have said, cutting hot wires won't end well for you, get the right tool and gear for that if that's in your plans.

I would grab an esee-5 for hard use. Its nothing to turn your nose up for and under 200 bucks
 

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Did you say live wires?
Do you mean like a electric fence for live stock?

make sure you were thick gloves.
 

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Did you say live wires?
Do you mean like a electric fence for live stock?

make sure you were thick gloves.
I've seen knives and even an axe (tomahawk) hit live wires. If the handle is insulated, you'll be fine, but every tool was severely damaged. I think the concern, which is valid, is if you're using your tool as an emergency breaching device in a built up area or downed aircraft. There's more possibilities of hitting a live wire, but your tool may very well be damaged beyond use.

ROCK6
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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I am trying to decide which knife I want.
Which I'll use for heavy duty work such as hacking branches and possibly a solid pummel suitable for hammering/smashing glass etc.
Cutting rope (serrated needed)

Also possibly a handle with glass. You know the ones that are electronically isolated so you can safely use to cut potentially live wires.

I am trying to decide which steel to go for also.
According toy research 1095 is easy to sharpen and holds an edge well.
However has corrosion problems requires honing and oiling.
Apparently this steel will get a sharper edge
440c holds an edge extremely well but is hard to sharpen, slightly more corrosion resistant.
Apparently a diamond type sharpener will be required.
420 HC seems to be a good balance. Moderately easy to sharpen. Corrosion resistant holds, an edge quite well.

Well from the face of it 420 HC seems to make a better camping knife. Because of its corrosion resistance and all round good qualities.
But most people seem to think either 1095 or 440c are better.

Ok i really like the Gerber lmf 2 infantry knife.
Which is 420hc
On the other hand kabar does some beautiful 1095 partially serrated or back serrated blades.

Do I really need an expensive knife?
Because us made ONTARIO 8680 sp2 is 1095 steel is only about 50 dollars. But looks beautiful. Similar to kabar. With a saw back and double finger guard. Full tang. Looks like a really good handle with a good grip.
any thoughts on this knife?

Do I really need to pay more, if it's got the right steel, full tang a good handle finger guard etc.

Seems on these boards people turn their noses up at anything under 200 bucks !
I have several of these:
LMF II Infantry - Black
 

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Desperta Ferro!
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I purchased a Glock knife last summer.
Not a fan of their pistols, but the knife is incredibly sharp and well-made. My only complaint is the hilt, which is a hard ABS type of plastic. I covered it with grip tape to give it the feel I was looking for.

The Glock knife is made from 1095 steel and came from the factory wickedly sharp. It is still just as sharp today as the day I bought it. Not exactly sure how an unused knife stored in its scabbard loses its edge, but if the experts say so, I'll take their word for it.

This was affordably inexpensive and high quality, imho. $35.
 

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I've seen knives and even an axe (tomahawk) hit live wires. If the handle is insulated, you'll be fine, but every tool was severely damaged. I think the concern, which is valid, is if you're using your tool as an emergency breaching device in a built up area or downed aircraft. There's more possibilities of hitting a live wire, but your tool may very well be damaged beyond use.

ROCK6
I hear your point, there could be high voltage that is completely hidden to sight.
This dude got really famous after he got electrocuted using his knife. If I understood, he touched a dead bear with his knife and passed out. The bear's body was covering some live wires.

He
 
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