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Here is one more question...


Is it a good idea to store and stock much of one's survival equipment in a camping trailer in the back yard. I would appreciate anyone's experiences in doing so. It would be nice to hitch up to a trailer and get out of dodge if shtf.

Michael
 

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If it was locked securely and wasnt easily stolen, then it could be a good idea. Keep it sealed well so animals cant get in.
 

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a camper full of your stuff in the backyard is just waiting for someone else to hitch his car to it and steal it.install alarms or big dogs.
 

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a camper full of your stuff in the backyard is just waiting for someone else to hitch his car to it and steal it.install alarms or big dogs.
Also consider a good hitch lock. We have a 5th wheel trailer in the back yard. There is a limit to how much stuff you can store and still be livable. A couple weeks, maybe a month, at most. In the winter we need to bring in a lot of the canned foods we normally keep on board. We do keep the stuff not susceptible to freezing in the trailer year around, and the other stuff boxed up on the heated porch, so we could be loaded, hooked up, and gone in under an hour (less, if we really need to). The truck has an extra 50 gallon fuel tank (diesel) and it always at least 75% full.

We look at the camper as a way to bug out if we need to go right now, not any kind of long term survival tool. Overall it's too fragile, too hard to heat, and carries too little propane (two 30 pound cylinders).

Given what I have learned over 25 years of camping in everything from a 2 person tent to the 35 foot 5th wheel, I would never buy a camper with survival as a primary objective. Great for a few weeks but not for the long term.

Edited to add...If you are planning to take your show on the road, don't overlook the weight considerations. Most campers don't have a real big pay load capacity. In a bug-out situation you will be running with a full fresh water tanks (250 to 350 pounds, depending on capacity) and you will have very little capacity for heavy stuff. A couple bags of rice and beans, some cans of soup and beef stew, cooking oil, etc, etc, and your weight limit is exceeded real quick. Also, consider weight distribution forward and aft of the axles to keep your hitch weight in balance. A fair number of campers on the road are overloaded as it is, add a few hundred pounds of survival supplies and they will be dangerously so.

I'm not trying to talk anyone out of using a camper for a BOV, but before you do, consider all the technical stuff that goes into it. It ain't as easy as it looks!!!
 

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Given what I have learned over 25 years of camping in everything from a 2 person tent to the 35 foot 5th wheel, I would never buy a camper with survival as a primary objective. Great for a few weeks but not for the long term.
I must disagree completely! Many people live in them perminently.
 

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Kodie is correct. After several years, I am still loving it. Survival was not the primary objective; it just happens to match up quite nicely though.
 

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I just bought a truck camper myself a few weeks ago. I'm prepping it to go 400 miles without stopping and hold enough food for a month. Do you guys think it's a good idea to keep beans and rice stored in a camper? The cold should'nt hurt them right?

Also, it's mounted on my 79 f-150.
wich is why I can only go about 400 miles, on 2 tanks of gas.
 

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Keeping my camper stocked up and ready means that I have a place to stay whereever I go that has food water, etc. for the short haul. Naturally one has to resupply at some point. That's a major disadvantage over a permanent bug out place where you can stock pile as much as you can afford. But in the event of a short term emergency, where I might be out up to 3 weeks, a camper is a good idea (if your partner is not the tenting type-as mine is not).
 

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I must disagree completely! Many people live in them perminently.
Yes, I know a number of full-timers, but most of them go from one RV resort to another with full hook-ups. They have their "dingy" (car towed behind a motor home) to go the the local grocery store whenever necessary. Very few dry-camp full time, which, IMHO, is more like what you would experience in a bug-out situation where you would likely have no shore power, no water at the site, and no place to dump your gray and black water, and no supplies at the camp store.

The up side is if supplies are short where you are, you can always pick up and move to greener pastures, provided you have the fuel and the highways are open and safe.

Do you guys think it's a good idea to keep beans and rice stored in a camper?
My only concern would be critters. Mice seem to just love campers. Store your rice and beans in a plastic tub of some sort to keep them out.
 

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The trailer question , remines me of the 1962 movie " Panic in year Zero" (which I recently got a copy of .
In the movie the family makes it to a remote area after L.A. is nuked. The husband has them move all their supplies into a cave.
The wife asked him what he was going to do with their trailer and he said "ditch it".
She said " why are we moving into a cave when we have a perfectly good trailer ?"
He said , " if we get fallout , that trailer well give us about as much protection as a silk nightgown".
Something to think about.......
 

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A trailer is a great idea, I lived in a 30 ft for 2 yrs after my divorce. Just remember if you have plans to go off road you to raise that trailer so you won't kill the holding tanks( fresh and grey water). To me it's a great idea.:thumb:
 

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I've mentioned this a time or two here. I think RV's are an excellent investment in your survival. Absolutely, having one will be extremely helpful if tshtf.

Look at what an RV can provide; Kitchen, bathroom, bed, heated shelter, mobility. Yes, you need to resupply. But don't you need to do that anyway at your permanent location if you lose power and water during shtf? And a used RV can be bought for a few thousand dollars. You get an awful lot of comfort for the money, IMHO.

If you have a piece of land for a BOL to go with your RV, you can be all set up for months or even years if you cache supplies on the land and prepare with a bit of guerrilla gardening to stretch those supplies. Just make sure you have access to water on your land and a good water filter to ensure it's free of bugs that can make you sick.

RV + cached supplies + BOL= surviving in style, IMHO. For more on this type in 'RV Homesteading' into Google and look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks

One of the reasons I thought of stocking a camper is to not only
be able to hitch up and go out for the weekend but I'm also a control freak and it would be very nice to have a majority of my survival gear and supplies in one place so there is not much thinking when a serious situation arises. I have not selected a camper yet but some of the suggestions will get me in the right direction if we do invest in one. Besides....my wife says she will go camping but not on the ground.......

Mike
 

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Here is one more question...


Is it a good idea to store and stock much of one's survival equipment in a camping trailer in the back yard. I would appreciate anyone's experiences in doing so. It would be nice to hitch up to a trailer and get out of dodge if shtf.

Michael
My answer: NO! Why? That's all of your $hit on wheels. That's asking for trouble. Locally, a Boyscout troop lost all of their camping equipment etc. when it was stored in their trailer in a church parking lot. Some jacka$$ cut the lockS and stole it. If you want mobility, buy some rubbermaid tubs. I keep a lot of my supplies in them just to keep them sorted and organized. I could throw a bunch in the back of my truck in 10 minutes.
 

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I agree with those saying that putting supplies in the RV is a risk. But can't you cut that risk a bit by using common sense?

How about, for starters, you never, ever talk about what you keep stored in your RV? Perhaps put the RV in the garage, if you have one. Do get a decent sized dog to alert you if anyone is snooping around your home or yard. Do lock the RV, adding better locks if need be. Put the RV very near the house so you can better keep an eye on it instead of the far back corner of your yard. Make sure you put motion sensitive flood lights near it for added security. Bolt the storage containers inside and make sure to put good locks on the bolted containers. And do not put all your supplies in it. Just put what you need to bug out inside and be ready to load more from inside the house if you have enough time before you need to bug out.

What steps you take to secure your RV depends on what area you live and what situation you are in. If you put your mind to it I'm sure you can reduce the risk of theft in whatever situation you are currently living in.

I still say the RV is the way to go if you have to bug out. Too many advantages to overlook and too many steps you can take to cut down on the risk of theft if you have one. Worth the money and the risk, IMHO.
 

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We keep a decent amount of stuff in our camper. It's not all of our supplies, but if it came down to it, either of our vehicles could hook up to it and bug out. That's all it really is, in a survival sense, a larger bug out bag. Enough supplies for a week or so. It just adds the comfort level. It's nice to know it's there and ready to go if I need it.
I don't like to put all my eggs in one basket. Just my $.02.
 

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It's a lifeboat

You should think of your camping trailer as a lifeboat. You can keep your supplies in large plastic bins inside where they are less tempting to thieves, and simply load the bins in camper in short order and get out of dodge. In an emergency evacuation scenario, why not go in comfort. An emergency evacuation does not require WW-III, it could be due to a wild fire or a nearby chemical spill. In a forced evacuation you will be much more comfortable staying at a nearby state park. If you have kids, the camper will reduce the fear factor associated with getting out of dodge, it is just another camping trip. If you are getting out of dodge you can carry more with the camper in tow than just piling a bug out bag in your vehicle.
 

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All for the camper...

Here is one more question...


Is it a good idea to store and stock much of one's survival equipment in a camping trailer in the back yard. I would appreciate anyone's experiences in doing so. It would be nice to hitch up to a trailer and get out of dodge if shtf.

Michael
I think the use of any RV or camper is a great Idea if that is your affordable option. I would agree that security and storage is important and might suggest deflating one or two tires as a measure of theft prevention (make sure you have the ability to reinflate first).

I myself have a 34' Eurocoach with all the equipment. We originally bought this when we were looking to relocate as it made travel with 3 children easier. Since my youngest is handicapped our situation is different but I am thankful we have the RV as one of our "tools".

If and when the SHTF I am hooked and rolling. Will I be overloaded? You bet but behind my 34' I'll have my Excursion fueled and loaded on our 26' flatbed taging my 12 cargomate. I'll be a caravan all unto myself!

Capacity wise I'm loaded down with 100 gallons of fuel onboard the RV 44 gallons in the SUV and another 300 gallons in aux. mounted trailer tanks. If I hit a bump just the right way I may create my own "fallout" zone! Freshwater supply is abundant at 100 gallons and the propane tanks hold 90lbs.

JMHO but for my money having the generator, solar charger, creature comforts, storage space and travel range is worth the investment. The RV itself may only provide temporary BOL but we have the freedom to travel any direction on the compass in a moments notice.

Of course all this means nothing if the routes are impassable or under marshall law???
 

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Here is one more question...


Is it a good idea to store and stock much of one's survival equipment in a camping trailer in the back yard. I would appreciate anyone's experiences in doing so. It would be nice to hitch up to a trailer and get out of dodge if shtf.

Michael
How hot will it get during the summer? Food preps might not be too good to store there.
 
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