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Silent Bob
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone I decided to remind everyone to be careful on their hiking trips this summer. This past Friday I went on a day hike on a trail that I had been on before but still about got myself into trouble For the first 2 hours things were fine but the last hour I started showing signs of heat exhaustion had I been on a longer trail things could have got bad. In retrospect these are the thing that I did wrong.
I started my Hike at 10 am. In Ga we are having temps in the 90’s so by noon you are looking at least 90 degrees plus and this isn’t in including the humidity.
I failed drink extra fluids a couple of days before the hike.
During the hike I was drinking 32 ounce of water per hour. I think I need to double my water consumption when I’m on hikes.
I failed to bring my cell phone with me. I know there no guarantee that a cell will work in the woods, but it’s better to have than not.
I was hiking by myself.
Please be careful when you’re out in the woods especial the solo hikers.
http://www.fema.gov/hazard/heat/heat_aid.shtm

Condition


Symptoms


First Aid

Sunburn
Skin redness and pain, possible swelling, blisters, fever, headaches
Take a shower using soap to remove oils that may block pores, preventing the body from cooling naturally.

Apply dry, sterile dressings to any blisters, and get medical attention.
Heat Cramps
Painful spasms, usually in leg and abdominal muscles; heavy sweating
Get the victim to a cooler location.

Lightly stretch and gently massage affected muscles to relieve spasms.

Give sips of up to a half glass of cool water every 15 minutes. (Do not give liquids with caffeine or alcohol.)

Discontinue liquids, if victim is nauseated.

Heat Exhaustion
Heavy sweating but skin may be cool, pale, or flushed. Weak pulse. Normal body temperature is possible, but temperature will likely rise. Fainting or dizziness, nausea, vomiting, exhaustion, and headaches are possible.
Get victim to lie down in a cool place.

Loosen or remove clothing.

Apply cool, wet clothes.

Fan or move victim to air-conditioned place.

Give sips of water if victim is conscious.

Be sure water is consumed slowly.

Give half glass of cool water every 15 minutes.

Discontinue water if victim is nauseated.

Seek immediate medical attention if vomiting occurs.

Heat Stroke
( a severe medical emergency)
High body temperature (105+); hot, red, dry skin; rapid, weak pulse; and rapid shallow breathing. Victim will probably not sweat unless victim was sweating from recent strenuous activity. Possible unconsciousness.
Call 9-1-1 or emergency medical services, or get the victim to a hospital immediately. Delay can be fatal.

Move victim to a cooler environment.

Removing clothing

Try a cool bath, sponging, or wet sheet to reduce body temperature.

Watch for breathing problems.

Use extreme caution.

Use fans and air conditioners.
 

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I was on a hike a few weeks ago where I got close to passing out. It was 90+ degrees. I would recommend taking along lots of water and taking your time. After it rained and cooled down I felt fine.
 

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The problem is if you just drink water its harse on you.. On a 4 hr hike I take a camal back 1 L full of water and 1 nalgine bottle full of gateraid.. What I do is drink the water then 2 hrs in start drinking the gateraid if you drink to much water it wont help as much since its hard on your system..
 

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Summer Heat

I always care lots of water. As for Gatorade not to big fan as they keep adding sugar. I eat beef jerky for salts and such that my body sweets out. I am about to try the elixir but camelbak it is suppose to be good. As for heat exhaustion I have instant ice to packs to help if needed.
 

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Sugar-free
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Last week we had temps in the 90's, with heat indices in the low 100's. I work in a frigid, air conditioned environment, and drink little water throughout the day. I came home from work, and I was mowing the lawn, big lawn and small push mower. I started feeling really nauseous, and my calves started cramping. I was sweating profusely, and realized what was going on, just as I was starting to feel like I might pass out! I got back inside, hydrated, and in about an hour I was good to go. Never happened before in my life! Kind of scary. This is something we all need to think about in the coming months.
 

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WINNING...humbly
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I find these things are extremely important for comfort while on a day hike.

1. Lots of water
2. Salty snacks
3. Wide-beamed hat
4. None 100% cotton clothing
5. A small wet towel or a bandana for the neck.
 

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Founder
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Last year I as almost overcome by the summer heat. Make no joke about it, its easy to underestimate how the heat can affect people.

 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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68,758 Posts
It's very easy to underestimate your water needs in the heat. Especially in humid heat. Your body puts out a lot more sweat, trying to cool itself, than it would do in a drier climate. Drink more than you think you need, and take regular breaks, in the shade preferably, to allow your body to shed some heat and cool off.

As one who struggles to stay acclimated to the heat by deliberately doing physical labor in the sun during the hottest part of the day, these are things I've learned the hard way. It's especially hard to judge how much water you need, because you don't always feel thirst in time. By the time you feel thirsty, you're already well on your way into dehydration. Stay ahead of thirst. Basically, if you can force down another sip, do it, and keep it up. Better to pee out the excess than try to play the catch up game once you're already dehydrated.
 

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I find that accidentally falling into a cool mountain creek has it's benefits. Keeps the pants/legs cool throughout the day, but this must be done in the morning and it needs to be like 60 or above and you need to have taken off your shoes and socks. Also, you can always carry a water filter to get more water when you drink lots.
 

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Salt is extremely important when you are taking in that much water. Hyponatremia is no joking matter, and it's scary how similar the symptoms are to heat exhaustion. Symptoms of hyponatremia include nausea and vomiting, headache, confusion, lethargy, fatigue, appetite loss, restlessness and irritability, muscle weakness, spasms, or cramps, seizures, and decreased consciousness or coma.
 

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Get your self acclimated. I find hiking in 90 degree weather in April to be miserable. By the time September rolls around 90 degrees is downright pleasant.
 

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where did you all took this misleading information about wetting your head/hat????
ITS WRONG!

in the back of our heads (almost neck) and in the foreheads, there are nerves that control body heat and cooling...
if you wet that spots keeping them cooler then the body, our brain translate it as a signal to stop (or lower) cooling processes... by that we overheat even more!

its wrong, and its dangerous! stop doing that and advising other people to do that!
 

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Renaissance Man
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7,503 Posts
This time of year is the worst. The temps can go from 60 one day to 90 the next. Our bodies are not acclimatized. Take it easy. Go on shorter hikes, carry less weight, drink lots of water. (I always carry a small filter so I can get more water if needed. There's nothing worse than being out of water in the heat and passing up water sources because it's dirty)

I don't really like Gatorade, for the reasons already mentioned, I prefer to have some salty food instead. Nuts, for example, are great because they not only replace salt, but other minerals as well. Calcium, for example, can be present in sweat. Just replacing salt doesn't cover everything.

Be aware, don't hike alone if you can help it. And if you are hiking alone, make sure someone knows where you are.

And don't forget our four legged hiking companions. The heat can get them as well.

Az
 

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Good of you to post this and GLAD TO SEE YOUR OK, too many people wait until it's too late and it can happen to any of us! My rule of thumb is this...if your thirsty your already getting dehydrated.

Believe it or not it's just as easy, if not easier to dehydrate during winter activities!

I firmly believe a water bladder/drinking tube is a very good thing to have because you can always be taking small drinks as you go rather then being like the person who waits to long to stop and take a drink.

It's also a good idea to have a long sleeve shirt on and such along with a wide brim hat. Your body will actually stay cooler by stopping that sweat from evaporating.

If your not alone on your adventures USE THE BUDDY SYSTEM! Keep an eye on each other and don't be afraid to tell your buddy they need to drink.

As far as taking the cell phone, so what if you think you won't have any reception. You just never know and it's good thinking on your part to take it! :thumb:
 

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Maximus
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where did you all took this misleading information about wetting your head/hat????
ITS WRONG!

in the back of our heads (almost neck) and in the foreheads, there are nerves that control body heat and cooling...
if you wet that spots keeping them cooler then the body, our brain translate it as a signal to stop (or lower) cooling processes... by that we overheat even more!

its wrong, and its dangerous! stop doing that and advising other people to do that!
Not to be rude, but do you have any actual resources to back this up?

I always understood thermal-regulation of body temperature to be controlled by the core of the body. Not the temperature of your head or neck, arms or other extremities. I was taught that nerves in your core sends message back to the brain. From there, the brain sends message to other parts of the body to regulate temperatures. But it is was not controled by the temperature of the head/neck.

Example: Extreme cold and hypothermia. In the arctic or other cold weather environment, your fingers and feet get numb because the vessels are restricting to send more warm blood to the core and brain to keep these vital areas warm. But this happens even if someone is wearing layers of warmth on their head or neck and no jacket.

I don't know... there maybe some truth in what you are saying but there maybe some wrong information also. Personally I hate going around with wet hair, so I never did that. But would be nice to know the actual science behind it.

But for me hiking in FL summer means jeans and t-shirts. Wet them both and you are hiking in cooling evaporation. Just do not wet yourself too close to night-time.
 
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