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Survivor
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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to find a practical role or two for my stout fixed blade knife. It is a bit too clunky for more delicate or intricate tasks (Gerber Strongarm) but one great feeling knife. The problem is that it doesn't fit any specific task in my 3 tool setup. It's still a great knife for the day pack, I just don't see it being an useful the more I try to fit it in.

Presently my setup is:
Small: Swiss army knife
Medium: Mora Knife (Alt: Gerber Strongarm)
Large: CS Shovel and/or Ontario 12" Machete.

Does anyone else find a stout medium blade to be useless when you have a larger cutting tool at your disposal for more stout-type tasks (ie: chopping)? I can see the argument for durability or redundancy, but what common sense (non-prybar/batoning) roles or tasks is it honestly superior in doing over the mora or another thin-bladed medium (4-7") knife?
 

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I don't know anything about this particular knife. But I have Hard Use medium size knives that I use, for all purposes, like my PMoore GZilla. It batons, skins & dresses deer, fish, snakes, makes fizzy sticks, food prep,can do precise cuts, notches, keeps a razor edge, and can still handle Extreme "Hard Use". You can check it out on my " Hard Use" Knife thread. It's all about what YOU get Use to. I have never owned a Mora. If it has good edge retention, and a grind that bites, good enough for what you would use a Mora for(or other thin blade), you have a great advantage. A stout Hard Use, Useful knife. Great question my friend. If it feels good, get you a really good edge on it, & start doing things you would normally do with both a smaller blade, & a Larger blade. You may find a "Happy Medium"!
 

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Adam, read back over my edited post, & really check out the thread" Hard Use Knives", and look at my PMoore TRex and what All it can perform, Very Well.
 

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Knives are a very personal preference kind of thing.

It's like a tool-box...you have all kinds of tools in there but each have a very specialized task and when used how it's built can do very well.

So my list...

Pocket Knife - used mostly when opening letters or boxes and the occasional manicure. Doesn't need to be long or stout, but it does the job very well and fits in my pocket in just a few ounces. I prefer the Boker Classic.

Hunting Knife - This is a compromise. As you want something to field dress and possibly skin without having a sharpening steel nearby. I have a very good 3-knife set for this use however when backpacking in the Rockies while Elk Hunting I decided that a light-blade that can be changed out is the way to go. Note, that I am not 'butchering' with a knife like the Havalon or Gerber Vital.

Hunting Knife when hunting close to the road - A good ole Remington 3-piece all carbon-steel construction knife set. I don't think they make then anymore but the pinky loops are very nice and are very easy to clean. Only pout is they weigh a good pound in the backpack. Not good for extended backpack hunts away from civilization or roads for that matter.

Butchering - My go-to blade(s) for this is a Wusthof set with a sharpening stick. Once sharpened it will allow me to process any 4-legged game animal in the lower 48 very efficiently and without having to sharpen too often.

If you want a very sturdy knife then look for a knife with good carbon steel that has the shaft going into the handle. Learn how to sharpen them right.

But if someone asked me which is the most common/practical knife used...Its a 3.5-4" blade Utility knife....
 

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Survivor
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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe its "useless" within the 3-tool setup you describe......

but as the single, "go to" "only" knife....seems a sturdy medium-sized fixed-bade would be best for that.

Oops, sorry.......that's another thread, isn't it?
The one knife only is an endless debate for some. Good practical thinking though.

Truth be told though, the one knife to rule them all is a CS shovel.
 

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I am trying to find a practical role or two for my stout fixed blade knife. It is a bit too clunky for more delicate or intricate tasks (Gerber Strongarm) but one great feeling knife. The problem is that it doesn't fit any specific task in my 3 tool setup. It's still a great knife for the day pack, I just don't see it being an useful the more I try to fit it in.

Presently my setup is:
Small: Swiss army knife
Medium: Mora Knife (Alt: Gerber Strongarm)
Large: CS Shovel and/or Ontario 12" Machete.

Does anyone else find a stout medium blade to be useless when you have a larger cutting tool at your disposal for more stout-type tasks (ie: chopping)? I can see the argument for durability or redundancy, but what common sense (non-prybar/batoning) roles or tasks is it honestly superior in doing over the mora or another thin-bladed medium (4-7") knife?
Yeah, with a SAK, Mora and larger chopper, that heavy-duty, stout fixed blade is less necessary. I do love those size of blades as duty or EDC carry, but if I can plan a more complete system, I find it less necessary and even a liability if I’m concerned about redundant weight.

Most don’t think of the Cold Steel shovel as a chopper, but it’s quite effective and if paired with a Mora and SAK (and maybe a decent saw), that is a solid combination for a variety of tasks. Of course your location does impact you decisions, but I wouldn’t feel “under-knifed” with those choices. However, I typically keep a quality, stout fixed blade on me anyways and something like the SAK, Mora and a chopper (along with a saw) would be in my bug out bag.

ROCK6
 

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Well, I feel you. Choosing knifes is hard, its like picking between your children. Why dont you just throw it in there and justify the extra weight with labeling th eknife as a backup? :p
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, I feel you. Choosing knifes is hard, its like picking between your children. Why dont you just throw it in there and justify the extra weight with labeling th eknife as a backup? :p
Well technically I can do 99% of my small knife tasks with my SAK, I just like a small fixed blade for making kindling, woodworking, and food prep or goofing around. So by fixed blade is a backup.

The perk to the stout blade is durability from rough use. The perk to the mora is doubling as a freaking scalpel in minor outpatient surgery. I've been pondering what a stout fixed blade can do that a 12" machete cannot, instead of trying to figure out what a stout blade can do Vs a mora. To me, the stout knife is a great jack of all trades, but master of none. It is tricky, because the nostalgia of a being a kid in the woods with only a survival knife to play with.
 

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Well technically I can do 99% of my small knife tasks with my SAK, I just like a small fixed blade for making kindling, woodworking, and food prep or goofing around. So by fixed blade is a backup.

The perk to the stout blade is durability from rough use. The perk to the mora is doubling as a freaking scalpel in minor outpatient surgery. I've been pondering what a stout fixed blade can do that a 12" machete cannot, instead of trying to figure out what a stout blade can do Vs a mora. To me, the stout knife is a great jack of all trades, but master of none. It is tricky, because the nostalgia of a being a kid in the woods with only a survival knife to play with.
Put you a Really Good Edge on that Stout Fixed Blade of yours, go spend a day in the woods, or go camping with it only. You may be surprised in "making" yourself use it, when you may use a Mora or machete, how well it performs. A lot of this is more about conditioning yourself to a certain tool. I like to be able to use whatever I have on me at the time, just to make sure it's my skills I rely on, than any said tool.
And unless your blade is some inferior steel, or doesn't have the right grind, you can reprofile that stout blade, & make it as sharp as Mora, plus you have the toughness for Hard Use if needed.
What kind of knife is it exactly?
That may have something to do with you not finding a place for it.
Personally, I wouldn't ditch it, unless it's not a good knife,& I would replace it with a Well made "Medium Size Hard Use Knife"
 

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I don't own a Strongarm myself, but a co-worker of mine just bought one, and it has be strongly considering one in the future. I have the Strongarm's predecessor, the Gerber Prodigy, and the larger LMF 2. Much like your (OP) impression of the Strongarm, neither of these is the ideal knife for many of the specific tasks of outdoor environments, but sometimes the "jack of all trades" is the most useful overall. There are a number of excellent YouTube videos that focus on the Strongarm, if you have some time to spare. Some of them dedicate some time to elaborate on the sheath, which is one of the Strongarm's selling points in my opinion.

I own a Mora Companion and Scout, numerous SAKs and a couple of machetes, but the medium-sized fixed blade category is what I will call "well-represented" in my collection. I rotate through different fixed blades on each hiking/camping trip, even if I don't need one at all, if for no other reason to see how they cooperate in a pack, on my belt or attached to a strap. They might not be the best at anything, but are capable of many things.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I actually bought the strongarm at its release before the YouTube knife gauntlet took place, I did just watch those in the past week. Makes me confident in the knifes utility, but maybe a little unsure of its practicality.

If I could only have one fixed blade medium knife, it's a hands down winner. But as a member in a full tool set it loses a specialized purpose to compliment a bigger bladed tool more apt for the job that requires the knife to be thicker.

But yeah, the sheath is tops and the knife feels really good in the hand. Ergo the dilemma of the OP. Do I carry a medium knife capable of finer tasks or a stout blade capable of hanging with the big boys. I guess it comes down to philosophy of knife sets.
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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I carry and use my becker bk2 often, more than capable of handling large tasks like chopping small trees, and still slicing onions for fried trout, and everything in between, batoning wood too...

If i had just one knife to carry, it would be it....

Sheath sucks though, getting a new one...
 

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Bug-In Prepper
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Yes, what Viper6Niner said. When I hear "stout blade" my mind goes to "bayonet". I find my bayonet invaluable as a prying tool, when I need to wrench on something with a seam too fine for an actual prybar to fit and too tough for thin-bladed knives.

If you don't have a prybar (like an 8" long crowbar) in your pack already, you can put the bayonet in it until that shortcoming is rectified, and then decide whether the prybar replaces or supplements the bayonet.
 

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Like a tradesman, you need a few options with knives. 3 sounds about right, but I like to use the right tool for the job.
SAK, and Multitool good choice.
Moras and like also multi use.
Heavy Duty- Bowies and specialties tools(Machete, Kuhkris, Hand Axe, Kabars, Columbia's fixed blades) all better than hacking up your med edge knives-batoning wood is splitting, axe-hatchet may be better served. Also, Bow saws hold their own too.

So, tool up, get cutting.
 

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Apocaloptimist
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What??? I only use fixed blade knives with a 4 to 6 inch cutting blade.

I process wood, skin deer and hogs, cut up the veggies...etc.

Go out into the woods on a 3 day camping/hunting trip and make a split wood fire with the folder, the Mora, and the fixed blade and report back on which one actually performed at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What??? I only use fixed blade knives with a 4 to 6 inch cutting blade.

I process wood, skin deer and hogs, cut up the veggies...etc.

Go out into the woods on a 3 day camping/hunting trip and make a split wood fire with the folder, the Mora, and the fixed blade and report back on which one actually performed at all.
Ironically I just recently split kindling with my SAK about two. I don't normally baton with a knife for philosophical reasons including my philosophy on not using an axe to filet a fish, but I needed some splinters for making a camp fire and gave it a whirl.

My knife is for food prep, light chopping and carving, and other random tasks like opening Amazon boxes. I have used my shovel for splitting firewood, just to have something to one up the knife splitting crowd.
 
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