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Quick question, sorry for making an entire thread.
We are on a well and I’ve already rigged things up to run off the generator should the grid go down. But to be safe-ER, I’d like to fill my Military 5gallon Scepter water jugs (not fuel cans) for longer storage. What are y’all’s thoughts on adding anything to the jugs? Bleach or ?? I have about 20 jugs so I don’t want to keep rotating the water every week since I don’t have anything growing to use it on.
Just like a little advice please.
 

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I have kept water in those jugs for about 9 months, then used them. Everyone's water is different and there are a million preferences on how to store water for how long.

My well has a UV light on it so I just add water and cap it off. Those jugs are very nice and strong, unlike a lot of other water jugs available at big box stores.

Did you get the spout for the jugs? That's nice to have.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Quick question, sorry for making an entire thread.
We are on a well and I’ve already rigged things up to run off the generator should the grid go down. But to be safe-ER, I’d like to fill my Military 5gallon Scepter water jugs (not fuel cans) for longer storage. What are y’all’s thoughts on adding anything to the jugs? Bleach or ?? I have about 20 jugs so I don’t want to keep rotating the water every week since I don’t have anything growing to use it on.
Just like a little advice please.
Add exactly 1/2 teaspoon of unscented normal strength household bleach per 5 gallon jug.

Cap it tightly and slosh it around inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have kept water in those jugs for about 9 months, then used them. Everyone's water is different and there are a million preferences on how to store water for how long.

My well has a UV light on it so I just add water and cap it off. Those jugs are very nice and strong, unlike a lot of other water jugs available at big box stores.

Did you get the spout for the jugs? That's nice to have.


Thanks for reminding me. I’m pretty sure I have at least one, probably 3 of the flexible spouts. Need to remembered grab those too.
 

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I put in a good about a bleach and water, shake. Then pour that into the next jug to clean. lightly rinse out the first jug and then fill. Had a couple sit outside for months on the BOT with no growth inside and water tasted fine. They were filled with untreated well water. -K
 

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Wearing fur underwears...
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I won't bother putting any bleach in, if I can help it. It I wanted to store it for years, which I likely wouldn't then perhaps a few drops. Not as much as Zeke recommends. Though I'm fairly sure that he knows his water treatment.
 

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Taking a page from the sailing crowd I bought mine in black to keep as much light as possible out of the jug so nasty stuff is less likely to grow!

Similar could be accomplished by storing them in a dark (preferably cool) place. I store my spring water in stainless steel or glass for weeks at a time with no treatment other than running it through a Berkey filter. The glass I try to keep in the dark, but don’t always manage it!

SD
 

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reluctant sinner
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I had those black plastic jugs in the Army, they made the water taste bad after a few weeks. Kool-aide made it drinkable. I reallocated 5 of the teflon lined metal water cans - way better tasting water after weeks of storage in the signal shelter.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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I won't bother putting any bleach in, if I can help it. It I wanted to store it for years, which I likely wouldn't then perhaps a few drops. Not as much as Zeke recommends. Though I'm fairly sure that he knows his water treatment.
Bleach degrades on less than a year into mere salt and water.

The recipe is not a guess. It's a CDC standard. 1/8 teaspoon per gallon.

In a 5 gallon jug I'm actually a bit light.
 

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Museum Piece
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Any stagnant water breeds moss and other slimey yuk.
We have 55 gal barrels and a well.

I have a 30 gal rubbish can out side the back door, just for toilet water.
Right now in the pouring rain it is ope, and the slime is being replaced by rain water
 

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I must be super lucky with my water. I never treat my well water. I have it sit in 5 gallon water jugs in the basement and garage or black 55 gallon drums outside from May to October and never have a hint of growth of any kind. Only issue I have is the minerals in the water precipitate out.
 

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When ever I get a new jug I will clean it out with hot water and dish soap real well. Then let it soak for a few minutes. Dump it out and refill for storage. If your still getting that plastic taste try agitating the jug. The air in the water seams to help this. Usually I only have to do this after they have been sitting all winter.
 

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When ever I get a new jug I will clean it out with hot water and dish soap real well. Then let it soak for a few minutes. Dump it out and refill for storage. If your still getting that plastic taste try agitating the jug. The air in the water seams to help this. Usually I only have to do this after they have been sitting all winter.
It helps to acid burn the HDPE plastic when you first buy it.

Vinegar being the easiest and cheapest option, though Limonene works too. Both are food safe once rinsed clean with soap and water later. This also works as your prelim sanitizing stage. Just add enough acid that you can coat the interior by sloshing it vigorously. Let is rest for an hour, then dump, rinse, hot water and soap wash, and then a couple good rinses. Finally allow to air dry in an area with overhead cover.

Next step is to fill with water, taking good care to avoid touching the cap interior or either set of cap threads with your hands. Add your recommended bleach additive and cap it. Store container ensuring it isn't in an area with VOC or motor exhaust fumes and not on unfinished concrete. It will store indefinitely though the years may see a little evaporation through the HDPE. When you are ready to use your water be sure to agitate or stir the water when you decant it in order to add air back to the water.
 

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Thanks on the info about the acid burn. First time hearing it though it does make sense. Double bonus with it disinfecting at the same time!
 

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Quick question, sorry for making an entire thread.
We are on a well and I’ve already rigged things up to run off the generator should the grid go down. But to be safe-ER, I’d like to fill my Military 5gallon Scepter water jugs (not fuel cans) for longer storage. What are y’all’s thoughts on adding anything to the jugs? Bleach or ?? I have about 20 jugs so I don’t want to keep rotating the water every week since I don’t have anything growing to use it on.
Just like a little advice please.
Just a tip here. You don't need a garden or an orchard to rotate your water. If you have a top loading washing machine it's easy to rotate water on laundry day. If you don't but you have a flushable toilet just get up on a saturday morning and shut off the valve on the line to the tank. Refill the tank after flushes from your stored water until you use up what you needed to rotate.
 

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Wearing fur underwears...
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Bleach degrades on less than a year into mere salt and water.

The recipe is not a guess. It's a CDC standard. 1/8 teaspoon per gallon.

In a 5 gallon jug I'm actually a bit light.
I trust that is so. But I don't see the need for it. Potable water doesn't turn to undrinkable very quickly, just because you didn't add the CDC recommended dose. I'm a little more invested in keeping the micro biome healthy in my gut, than making sure the water doesn't taste "green" or off. I don't like drinking water that has any kind of chlorine smell/taste.

With as thick as the Jerry cans are, in a cool spot, I suspect the bleach would last quite a bit longer. I do have a larger container that I keep mainly for washing water. I added a small amount of bleach to it, but as it sits on the basement floor, and is dark plastic; the bleach lasts awhile. IIRC it was about 3 years later when I opened it to check, and I could still smell it.

For my own drinking water, I'll leave it 6 months before dumping it and refilling with fresh. Probably be more like 3 for better water, but likely as of right now, longer than 6 months.

I'd just dump it rather than expend energy looking for a place to use it. It'll head back to an aquifer in time, and in the grand scheme of my water usage, it wouldn't amount to much.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Thanks on the info about the acid burn. First time hearing it though it does make sense. Double bonus with it disinfecting at the same time!
One of my first factory gigs was making a way to keep plastic bottles of cleaning supplies and automotive fluid from sucking in the bottles if they sat on retail shelves too long. One of several ways we tried was the acid burn to help move the surface molecules closer together. We eventually went with a process that worked much better but deadly hazardous and way beyond what a DIY person could ever do. But the acid wash helped to a measurable degree. It also hardens the plastic a tiny bit, so that plastic taste isn't as pronounced. And it sanitizes as well in a food safe way.

I trust that is so. But I don't see the need for it. Potable water doesn't turn to undrinkable very quickly, just because you didn't add the CDC recommended dose. I'm a little more invested in keeping the micro biome healthy in my gut, than making sure the water doesn't taste "green" or off. I don't like drinking water that has any kind of chlorine smell/taste.

With as thick as the Jerry cans are, in a cool spot, I suspect the bleach would last quite a bit longer. I do have a larger container that I keep mainly for washing water. I added a small amount of bleach to it, but as it sits on the basement floor, and is dark plastic; the bleach lasts awhile. IIRC it was about 3 years later when I opened it to check, and I could still smell it.

For my own drinking water, I'll leave it 6 months before dumping it and refilling with fresh. Probably be more like 3 for better water, but likely as of right now, longer than 6 months.

I'd just dump it rather than expend energy looking for a place to use it. It'll head back to an aquifer in time, and in the grand scheme of my water usage, it wouldn't amount to much.
Thickness of the container doesn't change the degradation rate. Chlorine is energetic and if not locked in a stable formula it will fall apart. Once it was diluted and put in the store jug the process started. If a store bought a bottle of Clorox and it didn't sell for a year it would end up as salty water without ever being bought and opened.

A healthy biome includes small amounts of chlorine. Chlorides are absolutely necessary to contraction of muscles. Because your body uses it, you have to metabolize it. Ergo, you have internal processes to deal with minor excess.

If you ever have a mixed drink in a bar, the very last step the bartender does when washing his glasses is dip them into a diluted bleach bath.

When you intake salt your body splits it and you end up with small amounts for free chlorides going through your system.

The diluted amount recommended by the CDC bears in mind natural body processes.

Am I not always talking about toxins risks around here? So I'm not casual about the bleach additive either. When asked how to treat the water a few posts back, I rounded the amount down. It's just my habit to be mindful of toxin risks. But I'm also worried about the many thousands of kinds of mold and algae too. Most perfectly harmless, but some truly nasty. A water jug accidentally contaminated and left for years can turn into a large petri dish. A small extra amount of chlorine that your body is fully prepared to process so that growth is blocked is worth it in my opinion.
 

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Thanks for the said burn info Zeak.

If you have any reservations about storing them in a place that could freeze...don't. The cap isn't in the water so that piece didn't break and the rest of the jug is so solid it didn't crack. This jug was in our cabin for about a month of freezing temps.
 

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Paratrooper X
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It helps to acid burn the HDPE plastic when you first buy it.

Vinegar being the easiest and cheapest option, though Limonene works too. Both are food safe once rinsed clean with soap and water later. This also works as your prelim sanitizing stage. Just add enough acid that you can coat the interior by sloshing it vigorously. Let is rest for an hour, then dump, rinse, hot water and soap wash, and then a couple good rinses. Finally allow to air dry in an area with overhead cover.
Just straight up vinegar or a vinegar solution?
 

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Paratrooper X
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It helps to acid burn the HDPE plastic when you first buy it.

Vinegar being the easiest and cheapest option, though Limonene works too. Both are food safe once rinsed clean with soap and water later. This also works as your prelim sanitizing stage. Just add enough acid that you can coat the interior by sloshing it vigorously. Let is rest for an hour, then dump, rinse, hot water and soap wash, and then a couple good rinses. Finally allow to air dry in an area with overhead cover.
Just straight up vinegar or a vinegar solution?
 
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