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Preparing...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it possible to store water from the tap?

If i was to get lots of old bottles and clean them then fill them with mains water would they last as long as regular bottled water?

This is mainly a cost thing, i would rather spend the money on prep food rather than water if it is possible.
This would also enable me to store a much greater amount of water at a lower cost.
 

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Behind Enemy Lines
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776 Posts
I personally will drink any clean water. Room temperature or cold.
I never had tap water "go bad", if thats possible. If you make sure the tops of the bottles are tightened like any bottle, then you should be fine.

I cannot find a reason why tap water in a bottle would somehow become "bad" water.
 

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Cranky old man
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Would tap water that has been treated (e.g. chlorinated) by the city have a longer shelf life than water drawn from a well?
 

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Last of the First Line
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I read that chlorinated city tap water being stored in appropriate water storage containers did not need to be treated for long term storage, but other water (well, rain-collected) had to be treated for storage. Can't remember the exact site - but it was one some other survival site.
 

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I store our well water here. I sterilize the bottles ,rinse well ,refill and add 3 drops of bleach per gallon.
So far no problems .
 

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The general rule for tap water provided by govt agency, city, pud, etc., is a five year shelf life. It will help to use clean containers. If you are reusing old containers, fill with water and add a few drops of chlorine bleach. Let sit overnite, then refill with tap water. The other issue is what type of plastic container you use. Some plastics decompose differently that others. More defined info can be found on this site with a search of water storage.
 

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how about this?

lately, i have added 2-liter bottles of tap water to our deep freeze (clean soda bottles)

this water is safe and provides extra "freeze life" to the freezer in case of power outages

when you need water you just pull one out and let it thaw ahead of time

this doesn't need preserving chemicals and i don't think "going bad" is a real issue as it is frozen solid preventing any growth of contaminants (bio or otherwise)

if i need more freezer space then take some out, or add some more as freezer space becomes available

isnt a lot really, maybe 4-10 bottles given the freezer usage but i thought it was a nice combo usage for saving water and preventing thaw of food when power is out

opinions?
 

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Responding to DSarver, we had 2 liters full of water occupy otherwise vacant space in our freezer. When the electricity went out for a week, the freezer temperature was still below freezing 3 days later (by then, we were back and hooked up a generator).
 

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Will let you beg for food
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Just make sure you do the following:

- if filling from say the kitchen sink, make sure you give everything a good scrub down with bleach, pay special attention to the spigot, you don't want cross contamination to happen

- rinse all the bottles well and take a new tooth brush and scrub the caps and threads on the bottles with hot water

- wash your hands with hot water and soap before you start

- try not to cough or sneeze anywhere near your 'filling station' - when you sneeze it covers a 6m area - how is that for an ew factor

And something I found out in my reading - never put containers that are storing water directly onto cement. So sit them on a board or such.
 

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Leave Me Alone
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lately, i have added 2-liter bottles of tap water to our deep freeze (clean soda bottles)

this water is safe and provides extra "freeze life" to the freezer in case of power outages

when you need water you just pull one out and let it thaw ahead of time

this doesn't need preserving chemicals and i don't think "going bad" is a real issue as it is frozen solid preventing any growth of contaminants (bio or otherwise)

if i need more freezer space then take some out, or add some more as freezer space becomes available

isnt a lot really, maybe 4-10 bottles given the freezer usage but i thought it was a nice combo usage for saving water and preventing thaw of food when power is out

opinions?
That is something I do also. I have a chest type freezer and put plenty of 2 liter bottles in the freezer filled with water. I loosen the caps, so they don't bulge or burst, then tighten them down after they freeze. Through a couple of hurricanes, my freezer stayed cold for several days. When my refridgerator started loosing temperature, I put a couple of frozen bottles in an ice chest and save the stuff in my fridge, by keeping it in the ice chest. As they start to melt, I use them for refreshing Ice water. Hurricane season is primarity in the summer and warmer months. It's good to have cool water when you need it. Now that I have a generator, the fridge stays cold and so does the freezer, but I rotate plugging in each one for a few hours, so I can run the a/c.:thumb:
 

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Scandinavian survivor
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How about sterilizing the bottles with hydrogen peroxide? I´m a bit weary of bleach...
 

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I'd rather be Jeeping...
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I use "Homer buckets" to store tap water. Those are the 5 gallon buckets available at Home Depot. They are very durable, have handles for easy transport, and lids that fit very tight. And they're cheap. In a SHTF situation the buckets can be used for other things as the water is used. Very good to have around.

~John
 

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Zomby Woof
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There are issues with some plastics and sunlight as well, this merits some research.
UV causes some plastics to break down, etc...

I sterilize with potassium metabisulphate but bleach will do the job.
 
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