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Home...where the horse is
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Prior to 9/11, we bought several large bags full of rice and beans. We stored these in the original plastic bags. 2 years later, we decided to break into these stores and found that the rice was infested with weevils.

Any hints or suggestions regarding long-term storage of white rice and beans?

As an aside, my Aircrew Candidate Training regards weevils as extra protein...a bonus. Please advise so we can assuage the fears of our teenage kids.
 

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there is nothing wrong with the rice, just boil the rice and the critters float to the top, then skim'em off.......welcome to third world cooking............and i have eaten pinto beans that i stored for ten years!.....kid you not.........
 

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bay leaves and vacuum packing [I pack in amounts that will fit in the container I keep rice in in the cupboard, which is about 3 lbs.] plus freezing 48 hours works for me. I've used bay leaves in flour and grains for a long time, and never find weevils or other freeloaders.
 

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Fashionably Prepared
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bay leaves and vacuum packing [I pack in amounts that will fit in the container I keep rice in in the cupboard, which is about 3 lbs.] plus freezing 48 hours works for me. I've used bay leaves in flour and grains for a long time, and never find weevils or other freeloaders.
Does the flour pick up any of the bay flavor? I recently bought a bulk load of bay leaves to use as pest control in the new pantry (just was going to sprinkle them on the shelves) but was also thinking about using them in flour and rice storage containers. I'm just wondering if my next cake will taste like bay leaves.
 

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Flour may smell of bay leaves but it's HIGHLY UNLIKELY it will actually stop the bugs. BTDT. Posted a pic on Frugals of a bucket of grits we opened. Was packed heavily with bay leaves. The weevils were all playing on top of the leaves like it was the Love Boat or something.

Bay leaves don't work, old wives tale. Sorry to break it to you.

Someone that has used them with WHOLE GRAINS is going to say "sure they do"- try it with a processed product like grits, flour, pancake mix, over the LONG TERM- i.e, at least 5 years. Been storing food since 86, I've tried just about everything...

The videos posted above is how the PROFESSIONAL PACKERS pack your food in Superpails. The proof is in the pudding with there "results" video showing 17 year old grains!!! Amazing!

Lowdown3
 

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Rednecknoise, thanks so much for that information on the movies. My husband and i looked up oxygen absorbers and mylar bags and were buying us a bunch. Awesome information. The one site sells everything, buckets, myalr bags and oxygen absorbers. Thanks again everyone for this information.
 

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it tickles dont it
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Rednecknoise, thanks so much for that information on the movies. My husband and i looked up oxygen absorbers and mylar bags and were buying us a bunch. Awesome information. The one site sells everything, buckets, myalr bags and oxygen absorbers. Thanks again everyone for this information.
i found the movies at another forum i joined so i cant take credit for the info ! It seems like the guys at P.A.W and their channel sponsor( since its in the credits) survival report really are keyed into what really need to be on folk's minds when they start to really prep for any long term event or are trying to be self reliant. The self sufficiency style movies SR puts(let alone his blog) out are truly tailored for folks trying to turn their BOL into a truly functional homestead!!

what was also a great help was the movies showing how they killed bugs that infested their rice!!!!!!

I cant wait to meet some of the PAW guys this weekend!!!
 

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Buy smaller bags that will fit in your deep freezer. Then freeze the bags or rice and beans for a week or two at 0 degrees. This should kill the weevils.

Moisture will collect on the bags after they are removed from the freezer, so put them on some towels, rotate a couple of times a day and let them dry for a week.

As for "long term food storage" - I disagree with the whole concept. At the most, someone should have 4 - 6 months of food stored. Past that, it is getting a little extreme and wasteful. Instead of highjacking this thread, I will be posting an indepth thread as to the reasons "why" I disagree with "long term food storage".
 

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I second the "just eat it" advise. I've cooked and eaten rice that had moths in it numerous times.

The moths float out, the eggs are not noticeable once cooked. I'm not sure I've ever eaten anything in between the egg and moth stage, but if I did, I didn't notice- the larvae are about the size of a grain of rice.

I don't want to sound nasty with this advise, especially coming on for my 3rd post with #1 being about an old can of sardines I ate, but when it comes down to it, our culture has issues with food that many others do not share, and it could come to haunt us.

I just heard a report yesterday, out of Burma (Myanmar) about a plague of rats wiping out crops and people starving. One thing especially that struck me was the description of children with swollen bellies. That is protein malnutrition- there was a plague of rats, IE protein running around.

I advise people to start going to ethnic restaurants if you can afford it, buy used cookbooks if you can't and start eating things you never imagined you would. First, you may like it. Second, it is good training. Third, it is really fun to see the looks on peoples faces when you break out something like myulchi. (that is little dried whole fish that look about like the guppy that jumped out of the tank and sat on your carpet all day)

Most (not all) of our food aversions are learned. My mother about freaked when I fed my six month old son some sashimi. I told her Japanese kids eat it and our bodies work pretty much the same way. By age three, I had him at a Korean restaurant and he got a whole fish. The waiter told him to be careful of the bones, so he plucked out the eye and ate it. "There's no bones in the eye".

You can see in a quick, easy experiment how helpful it is to develop broad food horizons. Next office party, order a bunch of pizzas and make sure one is anchovy. I don't know why, but most people won't eat them. When the pizza is running low, there is always some anchovy pie to eat. I ensure that I will always have some pie at a party this way, and it may seem silly, but it is nice to not be hungry because you have the willingness to eat things others won't. That could come in handy some day. Bottom line is if there is a culture anywhere that eats it, it is probably OK to eat (the folks who are dead ancestors are an exception and ended up with a prion disease). So, if it comes down to eating a horse, I'll get a recipe from a French cookbook and fire it up right. Develop a taste for the unusual now and it won't be a hardship when it is forced upon you.
 

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The thing about weevils is their damn eggs are in most everything before its even packaged, so without freezing or other extremes to kill them off, they just continue to pop up in whatever grain products you can find.

This house has been infested with grain moths for the last 4 or 5 years. We've managed to keep their numbers down pretty well this year, but [email protected]$& they are annoying. Unless its super well sealed, we wind up with them in just about any dry food. It wouldn't be as big an issue with the food if they didn't spin these little webs all over. I'm so used to it I check pastas and whatnot when Im cooking from other peoples' houses just out of habit by this point. You can indeed eat the bugs, and my only aversion to them is contempt from the grand annoyance they've been in all other parts of the house as well.

We have a cat and a horse here, neither of which I'm fond of, and over the last couple years I think all my talk about eating them has actually sunk in with the other residents, lol. Both exceptionally lazy and stupid for what they are, the horse is dangerous because of how blithering retarded he is and the cat (supposed to be an outdoor cat to help with rodent control) just lies around in the house whining and gets fat stealing our food. We've all come to agree that they'd be better as food in a survival situation. That and I hate stray cats and wouldn't give him the chance.

If you have any useless pets like this around when it all goes down, by all means, make use of them. They probably taste better than the supermarket crap meat most are used to.
 

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Those moths are annoying, you are right about that! I clap them out of the air any time I see them. Keeping the food in screw-top plastic containers helps a lot. I'm not sure it actually cuts down on the number of moths, but it does keep them from flying around.

The ones I have don't seem to bother the pasta. It can just sit in a cardboard box without infestation- they don't want to eat it. Sometimes I'd like to know what they know that I don't.
 

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When you go to pack your food, you need to do within short order of getting the food home. The paper or cloth/plastic sack the food came in is NOT designed for any type of real storage condition.

Pack your food as soon as you possibly can, use the mylar and oxygen absorbers, get lids that actually SEAL and you won't have a problem with bugs.
 

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it tickles dont it
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As for "long term food storage" - I disagree with the whole concept. At the most, someone should have 4 - 6 months of food stored. Past that, it is getting a little extreme and wasteful
What about folks living in the city. Folks that can't go out and shoot a deer to feed their family off the land?
maybe feral cats? or rodents?
hard to say. In my eyes it seems urban dwellers will have it the hardest if an event turns long term. Most do not even have the preps to last 1-2 weeks. Those that do try and garden or are well to do will become targets i think. But that is a different subject all of its own.
I think that if you pack the food properly and with proper packing materials you should be fine. I had some weevils once in some corn meal in the pantry took forever to find where they came from and to clean them up
 

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off topic a little;

I hate to add this, but along the lines of a few prior posts, city folk as well as country have a plentiful, easy to hunt/gather meat source (that a country I spent some time in considered a delicacy)... Fido.... I realize that it's sad to think of eating Rover, but one mans pet is another mans feast. A friend of mine has a pet pig, I call that breakfast meat, not a pet.


On topic,
which are better for long term storage? Bugging in wise.

canned beans (in liquid) - dry bulk beans?
processed dry pasta in cardboard boxes - equivalent amount of flour to make the same amount of pasta?
coffee beans - ground coffee?
dry milk powder - condensed milk cans - boxes of that non refrg. milk?
cans of condensed soup - dry soup mix (Ramen etc)?
bulk unprocessed rice - boxes of minute rice? (if $ not the factor)


by the way - Fido didn't taste all that bad..... sorry, I had to try it when I was there.
 

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on the subject of suburban ''game'' around here there is an abundance of morning dove, quail and pigmy cottontail......yum
 

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there is nothing wrong with the rice, just boil the rice and the critters float to the top, then skim'em off.......welcome to third world cooking............and i have eaten pinto beans that i stored for ten years!.....kid you not.........
I heard that pinto beans get hard after long term storage. So how were you able to eat 10 year old beans if this statement is true?
 
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