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Fattie Ninja!
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So i had a crazy idea , i keep my 16 gallon drums filled with premium gasoline , i rotate em twice a year to keep it fresh , a couple of weeks ago i was at a Chemistry class and we were talking about racing gas mixes and gas degradation due oxidation , so i came up with an idea , if i replace the oxigen inside the container with Argon that would slow down the oxidation process .. i got the argon from my welder and filled the tank with it , the same way we fill inox piping before welding it . my tanks are gas tight so i can prevent 99% of the evaporation.. what do you think ?
 

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Never Give up
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7,579 Posts
Or you could add Pri-G. First when you get fuel half of its shelf life is already gone. Fuel usually has a good life span of 6 months. After that it goes downhill. But We swear by Pri-G and Pri-D for diesel.
 

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Ham Extra Class
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3,262 Posts
If the gasoline is in an air right container, what about expansion?
If it is air tight enough and has enough head space for expansion
if it would hold the argon in then it would hold outside air out also.
What im saying is in an air tight container it would not mater if there was
A little room air in the container or argon, if the container is air tight.
Think of a propane bottle and then think of how long it lives.
Heat is the real enemy of gasoline, with moisture next on the list.
Air tight is air tight.
 

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Fattie Ninja!
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
i keep em on a cold place , pri g is not an option here , cant find it on any stores here in Southamerica , ended using briggs and stratton fuel presserver. i read about the propane bubbling proces to revive old gas . havent tried it either , also i was thinking in keeping xylene to mix it with my fuel to boost the octane rating .
 

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Ethanol plus gas equals reduced storage no matter what fuel preservative you put in it. Almost all thee fuel in the States has ethanol in it instead of mtbe.
 

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I have a 55 gallon drum I keep air tight and the barrel is brim full .
It is 3 years old .
Basically what I do from time to time, Once a month or so, is draw off a few gallons for the bike or tractor and replace it when I go to the gas station again.
I always add some stabilizer before I add the new gas, os it mixes and stirs while is replenish it. It's full to the top so there is less than a gallon of air space .
I notice too, that being full like that ; that there is very little gassing .
Where as when a few gallons are missing, the gas pressure is built up well.
My drum is on a steel frame with steel wheels on a concrete floor . so the barrel remains grounded to some degree.
Maintaining a ground is important to prevent a static charge filling or drawing fuel.
This because it is a noted recommendation a the gas station, for filling remote fuel tanks.
 

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Chains keep us together.
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22,136 Posts
gas is full of Oxygen atoms, just keep it full and tightly sealed. the gas is what expands not the liquid that much anyway. keep the evaporative surface to a minimum.
 

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Fattie Ninja!
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the suggestions , im burning part of the fuel on my old 82 suzuki samurai , if the carb clogs , its easy to clean even at the side of the road ...
 

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Fattie Ninja!
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Wish i could buy it locally , down here there is no seafoam motor treatment , no stabil , the only thing ive got is those small packets of briggs and stratton fuel preserver .
 

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I have a 55 gallon drum I keep air tight and the barrel is brim full .
It is 3 years old .
Basically what I do from time to time, Once a month or so, is draw off a few gallons for the bike or tractor and replace it when I go to the gas station again.
I always add some stabilizer before I add the new gas, os it mixes and stirs while is replenish it. It's full to the top so there is less than a gallon of air space .
I notice too, that being full like that ; that there is very little gassing .
Where as when a few gallons are missing, the gas pressure is built up well.
My drum is on a steel frame with steel wheels on a concrete floor . so the barrel remains grounded to some degree.
Maintaining a ground is important to prevent a static charge filling or drawing fuel.
This because it is a noted recommendation a the gas station, for filling remote fuel tanks.
I do the exact same thing, I also draw off 5 gallons every week or so and put fresh in, Mine is over 3 years old and the gas is fine, like you said he key is keeping it full and sealed
 
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