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Learning to Survive
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking into buying a backpacking stove that will double as a post-SHTF stove as well, but i have a question as far as fuel storage goes, are there any specific rules on it? Also what's a good model stove for under $150, and best fuel to go with it?
 

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I am a stove and lantern collector so i have way more than one person could ever need. there are tons of options when it comes to fuel stoves. the one i use the most is a coleman one burner vintage 502. it would not be a very good backpacking stove because of the weight but can heat and cook off full size pots and pans. the smaller backpacking stoves are mainly used to heat and boil small amounts or water for dehydrated food and boil drinking water.

there are two main type of stoves. one has a fuel bottle screwed to the bottom the other has a refillable fuel container built in. the built in fuel tank is usually bulk and heavier.

There are a few questions you need to ask yourself-
Is weight going to be a big factor?
are you going to be using it in high elevation?
how big it the pot you plan to cook on?



These days butane/propane mix are what the backpacking people are getting. these are very tine stoves and light in weight. the problem with them is you must ration the canister of fuel you cant top it off.

So really both are ideal. unless your car camping the tiny butane stoves are best. For shtf coleman style all the way. you can buy coleman fuel by the gallon and if stored right will last forever. coleman fuel is not as volatile as gas so storing should not be a problem. hope this helps
 

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also forgot to add some recommendations.

For a cheap butane style stove that is not at high altitude the Bunton pocket rocket is a great buy. it will not heat like other larger stoves but will do the job and fits into the palm of your hand

for cooking full size pans and pots i would suggest something larger. nothing beats the coleman 502 sportster. the problem with the 502 is they have not been produced in years so you would have to buy a used one off ebay. also the 533 dual fuel single burning stove is the same thing only newer and can be bought new still. the older 502 is bulletproof the newer 533 is a bit on the cheaper side and may break.
 

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I am a stove and lantern collector so i have way more than one person could ever need. there are tons of options when it comes to fuel stoves. the one i use the most is a coleman one burner vintage 502. it would not be a very good backpacking stove because of the weight but can heat and cook off full size pots and pans. the smaller backpacking stoves are mainly used to heat and boil small amounts or water for dehydrated food and boil drinking water.

there are two main type of stoves. one has a fuel bottle screwed to the bottom the other has a refillable fuel container built in. the built in fuel tank is usually bulk and heavier.

There are a few questions you need to ask yourself-
Is weight going to be a big factor?
are you going to be using it in high elevation?
how big it the pot you plan to cook on?



These days butane/propane mix are what the backpacking people are getting. these are very tine stoves and light in weight. the problem with them is you must ration the canister of fuel you cant top it off.

So really both are ideal. unless your car camping the tiny butane stoves are best. For shtf coleman style all the way. you can buy coleman fuel by the gallon and if stored right will last forever. coleman fuel is not as volatile as gas so storing should not be a problem. hope this helps
 

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I'm looking into buying a backpacking stove that will double as a post-SHTF stove as well, but i have a question as far as fuel storage goes, are there any specific rules on it? Also what's a good model stove for under $150, and best fuel to go with it?
Get a multi-fuel stove. I have the Optimus Nova. I love it. The Whisperlite International is also a great stove. The MSR XGK I hear great things about it as well. Multi-fuel for Bug Out is my opinion. For camping and backpacking stock white gas for your Multi-fuel stove.
 

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Just my 0.02 but to get a really good product for the application, you're going to wind up buying one for the backpack and one for post-shtf.

For the backpack, depending on what you actually need, you might be able to just go with a can and a few of the fire-sticks. They are really big matches and burn for 12 minutes. Used correctly, they can get your hot water ready for tea and a dehydrated meal pretty easily. That is the lowest end option.

Fuel tab stoves, sterno, rockets..you name it. All sorts of options. What they don't do is work well when you're trying to cook a giant pot of stew for a bunch of folks.

Post-shtf (assuming it is truly permanent) you should have a nice big brick or stone grill/oven set up that will take wood of opportunity. Solar ovens are also life-savers. I have one that is actually a little suitcase and sets right up. Those are a big pricey though.
 

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Learning to Survive
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Discussion Starter #8
after looking at some stoves on rei im thinking either the MSR Pocket Rocket or the MSR WindPro Stove. And for post SHTF Coleman 2 Burner Propane Stove. First which MSR stove would you recommend and 2 how would I go about storing the fuels for the 2 different stoves?
 

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after looking at some stoves on rei im thinking either the MSR Pocket Rocket or the MSR WindPro Stove. And for post SHTF Coleman 2 Burner Propane Stove. First which MSR stove would you recommend and 2 how would I go about storing the fuels for the 2 different stoves?
If those are your two choices in stoves I'd go with the Wind Pro. You can wrap a wind shield around the stove and not wind up creating a bomb in the process. If you really want a sit on top fuel canister stove like the pocket rocket, forgo the pocket rocket and get the Giga Power. Smaller, lighter, much more stable than the pocket rocket, It's more packable (I keep mine in my Titanium cup with a fuel bottle), and it comes with an piezo igniter (which the pocket rocket doesn't have). Fuel storage: Like I said I keep a small bottle in my cup with the Giga Power (do the same with my Jetboil too), the back ups are just thrown in with my other gear. The Iso/Butane cans are safe. I've never had one leak or had any other problems with them. I have dozens of them sitting around my gear room.
 

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Learning to Survive
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Discussion Starter #10
If those are your two choices in stoves I'd go with the Wind Pro. You can wrap a wind shield around the stove and not wind up creating a bomb in the process. If you really want a sit on top fuel canister stove like the pocket rocket, forgo the pocket rocket and get the Giga Power. Smaller, lighter, much more stable than the pocket rocket, It's more packable (I keep mine in my Titanium cup with a fuel bottle), and it comes with an piezo igniter (which the pocket rocket doesn't have). Fuel storage: Like I said I keep a small bottle in my cup with the Giga Power (do the same with my Jetboil too), the back ups are just thrown in with my other gear. The Iso/Butane cans are safe. I've never had one leak or had any other problems with them. I have dozens of them sitting around my gear room.
I believe I looked at the gigapower one but if i'm not mistaken it requires you use gigapower brand fuel which i saw as a disadvantage, if that is true do you see it as a disadvantage?
 
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