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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it really as simple as: put food in, put o2 absorber in, seal??

Also, is there a comprehensive list of what can be stored in mylar and the approximate shelft life after storage?
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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At the basic level, yes, it is that simple.

You don't want the food to be damp or wet, you want it dry (and don't put in a dessicant in addition to the O2 absorber; it works at cross purposes to the O2 absorber).

There's a little learning curve in terms of sealing the bags but it's not huge; you can plan to buy a few extra bags on which to practice or as backups when you make a mistake or two.

Many people use irons to seal the bags; others use hair straighteners. If you go whole-hog you can buy a hotjaw sealer (what I use).

Before I had the hotjaw sealer, I used an iron. I made up a jig that allowed me to easily seal 1-gallon mylar bags without having the food spilling out. Pics below.





I used this to seal 7-mil bags, and it works fine. If you do something like this (the sticks are 1" nominal stock, 3/4" actual dimension), make sure you sand the edges to remove burrs and sharp parts that can poke the bag.

Works especially well with the lighter-gauge mylar, too.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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It's important that whatever you put inside the bags be completely dry.

Items such as rice, dried lentils, oatmeal, wheat, or split peas work well.

Items such as, for example, "dry" dog food or cat food actually have small amounts of moisture in the kibble, both water as well as oils, that likely make "dry" pet food less than ideal for long term storage.

Otherwise, as goose3 said, it's pretty straightforward. Here is a similar thread with additional info:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=3826849#post3826849
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's important that whatever you put inside the bags be completely dry.

Items such as rice, dried lentils, oatmeal, wheat, or split peas work well.

Items such as, for example, "dry" dog food or cat food actually have small amounts of moisture in the kibble, both water as well as oils, that likely make "dry" pet food less than ideal for long term storage.

Otherwise, as goose3 said, it's pretty straightforward. Here is a similar thread with additional info:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=3826849#post3826849
So would that mean no nuts...because they have oil in them??

I checked the sticky and there is almost too much info - I read it forever and still had questions about what can be stored and how long it would last.

I'll check out this one, though.

Thanks!
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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So would that mean no nuts...because they have oil in them??

I checked the sticky and there is almost too much info - I read it forever and still had questions about what can be stored and how long it would last.

I'll check out this one, though.

Thanks!
You're not going to get long-term (10+ years) storage out of anything with a high oil content, stored in mylar w/ O2 absorbers.

Brown rice, because of its high oil content, is not a candidate for long-term storage. Neither are nuts, nor is whole wheat flour (the unmilled wheat berries *do* work well for long-term storage).

The basics that people have success with in long-term storage include things like rice (not brown rice), beans, wheat berries, potato flakes, dried milk, split peas, lentils, pasta, popcorn (can be ground for corn meal), oat groats, dried spices. And there are more (these are just some of what I have stored in mylar w/ O2 absorbers--mostly in 5-gallon buckets).
 
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