Survivalist Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about survivalism? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How are you folks storing your beans and rice and the like? Would like to store a good bit of each but want to make sure I do it right. Don't want them going bad. The big bags of dried beans you can purchase at Walmart or Sam's club. Do you just place them in a water proof plastic bin or something. Or do they need to be vacum sealed or some other way. Sorry if this seems like a stupid question. But I'm new to all this prepping. I know hunting and archery fairly good. But the rest of it I'm learning as I go. Thanks for any help.


P.S.
If anyone has ideals of dried non parishable foods that are good to store besides the mentioned beans and rice please list them.
 

·
Looks like rain to me.
Joined
·
41,431 Posts
Check your local doughnut shops, bakeries, restraunts or grocery store for 5 gallon plastic buckets. Get some mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. Google that stuff. i've ordered from these guys in the past. Got a bad batch of O2 absorbers and a replacement with return UPS label right away, no questions asked.

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/emergency_supplies/mylar_food_storage_bags.htm

Another good site

http://www.sorbentsystems.com/mylar.html

Check out this video, its easy.

http://www.youtube.com/user/delta69alpha

http://www.youtube.com/user/delta69alpha#p/u/47/PylQCiFBtH4

http://www.youtube.com/user/delta69alpha#p/u/48/GfcWNOWUit8

These guys have a great youtube channel
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
Vacuum sealing is a great way to go. Although sealing them in mylar bags with O2 absorbers is probably the most popular way. I have cheated a little in the past and stored them in buckets with O2 absorbers but no mylar. I use gasketed lids. Supposedly the plastic of the bucket will let air in over time, but I've had them maintain a vacuum for 12 years so far. I still recomment the small extra expense of mylar. I just thought I'd toss that out there as info. You can store anything dry that way. Another thing you can do is use smaller mylar bags and pack several per bucket. That way you only open the one you're using and the rest stay sealed. Or even pack several different types of food in the same bucket so you don't have to open so many to have variety.
 

·
Founder
Joined
·
16,867 Posts
I like to get the air tight plastic ammo cans from a local sporting goods store and store my rice and beans in them. Before they go into storage, I'll put the rice and beans in the freezer for a week or so to kill any weevils.

My rice, beans,,, stuff like that are not really "in storage" per say, because I'am using it all the time.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,053 Posts
'Dried' food.

To remain in perfect condition dried foods need to remain dry. No moisture.

Dried foods do not last long based upon contact with O2, they last a long time based on their lack of moisture.

Sealed so that no fresh air [moisture laden] can touch them, is all that dried foods need.

I have high humidity at times, so I must used desiccant when I seal things.

Fortunately desiccant can be used over and over.
 

·
Mod Certified PITA!
Joined
·
12,092 Posts
I seldom throw away the glass jars food comes in, and I've got a large (and growing) collection of canning jars, many of which aren't full of preserves at the moment. So I put my dry goods in those (carefully cleaned and dried) jars, and close them with the caps the jars came with or canning lids and rings cinched down snug but not so tight it damages the rings on the lids. The result is air and water tight containers I can see what's in at a glance, and which I can stack on my pantry shelves several deep. It's even better if I throw in an O2 absorber...

As for other dry goods: Lentils, barley, macaroni and other pasta products, oatmeal (rolled, steel cut, or whole groats), wheat, salt, sugar, split peas, hard candy, chocolate (as long as the storage area doesn't get too hot), dehydrated fruits and vegetables, popcorn... Not for the popping; rather, if you've got a GOOD grain mill, you can grind popcorn into an acceptable cornmeal...

That's all that comes to mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
If you get dried food in metal cans, make sure you coat them with something. The shelf life might say 25 years, but the can will start rusting in a few years if you don't coat it. I hear dipping them in wax works pretty good.
 

·
old hand
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
My rice, beans,,, stuff like that are not really "in storage" per say, because I'am using it all the time.
rice and beans ... we buy in the big sacks, one in the cupboard, one in the pantry. When the one in the cupboard is empty, we move the one from the pantry to the cupboard and make the entry on the shopping list. The next time we go shopping, we buy another for the pantry.

We do the same with canned goods ... buy in cases at Sam's.
We do the bulk shopping every other month or so (the nearest Sam's is 80 miles away.)
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
I would add dehydrated milk and dehydrated eggs to your storage. Harder to do/find but it sure adds balance.
Definately sound advice. Dried veggies and fruit too to give variety and nutrition. Lack of variety can lead to appetite fatigue and that can be fatal in some people. I tend to be prone to it, so I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Could you clarify on the dried only needing no contact with moisture. I dry veggies like tomatoes and vaccuum seal. Is that adequate for say a 1 or 2 year storage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
Most of our rice and beans are stored in sealed #10 cans with O2 packs inside. Done at the LDS dry pack cannery. Also powdered milk, macaroni, and a host of other items.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,053 Posts
Could you clarify on the dried only needing no contact with moisture. I dry veggies like tomatoes and vaccuum seal. Is that adequate for say a 1 or 2 year storage?
Dried and vacuum sealed is perfect.

It your bag were to be left open, the risk is mold. The mold would possibly grow from the moisture in the air. Being sealed should prevent that. No problem.

I store a lot of grain. [A couple dozen 55-gallon steel drums with plastic liners] It is not dehydrated, so there is some moisture inside the grain. Sealed tight some of that moisture may cause mold to grow, and has done so in the past. I have found that storing whole grain like I do, requires desiccant; to suck up some of that moisture when it gets released from the whole grain.

If you are drying veggies and vacuum sealing them; there should not be any mold growing in the bag.

:)
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
Could you clarify on the dried only needing no contact with moisture. I dry veggies like tomatoes and vaccuum seal. Is that adequate for say a 1 or 2 year storage?
Vacuum sealing is fine for short term of only a couple years. For true long term storage, the foods not only need to be dry, but also to not be in contact with O2, which chemically degrades them.

I do the same for my home dried veggies. I vac seal them and use them within 2-3 years and they're just fine.

For the ones I pack away for long term, I use mylar and O2 absorbers. Because vacuum sealing doesn't remove as much O2 as an absorber, and the vacuum sealer bags are not true gas barriers like mylar, thus they slowly let air back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
I dehydrate fruits, veggies, herbs, then put them in canning jars (utilizing the seal-ring and cap). Normally I store them in a cabinet, out of the light.

Recently I've upped my drying and have more jars than my cabinet will hold.

We have a large basement where I keep my pressure-canned foods, BUT...we've been "blessed" with an underground stream which runs thru the basement during wet seasons.

The pressure & water-bath canned goods keep quite well there, however I'm concerned about storing the dried goods there. Does anyone know how well they might keep in such a moist area?

I also have a large, HOT attic with plenty of storage room.

Would the attic or the basement be better for 2-3 year storage of dehydrated goods?
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
68,758 Posts
I dehydrate fruits, veggies, herbs, then put them in canning jars (utilizing the seal-ring and cap). Normally I store them in a cabinet, out of the light.

Recently I've upped my drying and have more jars than my cabinet will hold.

We have a large basement where I keep my pressure-canned foods, BUT...we've been "blessed" with an underground stream which runs thru the basement during wet seasons.

The pressure & water-bath canned goods keep quite well there, however I'm concerned about storing the dried goods there. Does anyone know how well they might keep in such a moist area?

I also have a large, HOT attic with plenty of storage room.

Would the attic or the basement be better for 2-3 year storage of dehydrated goods?
As long as the moisture can't get to the dried food itself, it's not going to cause a problem. But it might rust out your lids.

Heat will shorten food storage life, so I'd avoid keeping any in the attic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Does anyone use a vacuum sealer with a lid attachment to store dried foods in glass canning jars? We've gotten the attachments for both large and small mouthed jars, and started the process with dried beans. I plan to also vacuum seal jars of pasta. Will this work, or am I wasting my time? Sorry for the (probably) silly questions, but I'm new to this. :)
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top