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I'm looking to seal some bags of sugar in mylar. Looks like the 1 gal mylar bags should do the trick.

Question is, should I seal them in their paper bags or empty the paper bags into the mylar directly?

I was thinking of leaving them in the paper bags as an added protection.

Also from what I remember it's not needed to include oxygen absorbers in sugar. Using them will cause the sugar to form into one big block. Is this correct?
 

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from what i understand protecting sugar from moisture is more important than protecting it from oxygen... so i think the mylar might be a step too far... i plan to leave mine in the original paper wrapping and try to seal it in a normal plastic foodsaver bag
 

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from what i understand protecting sugar from moisture is more important than protecting it from oxygen... so i think the mylar might be a step too far... i plan to leave mine in the original paper wrapping and try to seal it in a normal plastic foodsaver bag
Yup, my main purpose is to protect it from moisture.
 

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Do you think the freezer ziplock bags would be enough?
not sure... the seam is the obvious issue... i would use something that you can laminate closed... as i said i am going to try a foodsaver bag from a roll, sealing both ends...

i dont plan on vacuming it as that adds tention to the bag and creates more potential to create a tear.

you could add dessicant, but i think that the orginal paper wrapping will assist with preventing moisture from getting into the sugar itself.
 

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I store my sugar two ways.

Short term (to use in the next few years): I just dump it all into a 5 gallon bucket with a gamma seal lid on it.

Long term (25 years +): I dump it out into 1 gallon mylar bags, 4-5 bags per bucket. You could also use 5 gallon mylar bags, but I don't have any.

I don't have much long term done yet, as I'm not anywhere close to being where I want to be with short-term. I learned last year how quickly a bucket of sugar can be used up when you are canning.
 

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We store a lot of sugar. We pour it in mylar bags ( some in 5 gallon bags, some in 1 gal bags), no 02 absorbers, all inside plastic lidded pails.

With this system we are controlling moisture and any creapy-crawly.

Occasionally we use some and open oldest first, a few lumps found but not a problem.

Even if it turns hard it's still good, just break it up or grate it.

Oh, and a big reason we keep in plastic pails is for protecting against leaks or punctures to the bags.
 

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Camperius maximus
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I opened up some and set some in their bags, the open ones I have marked 1st and the others 2nd. I use the desecant to pull out the moisture since water is 2 parts oxygen. I seal with a small bead of oil to seal the O-ring in the 5 gallon bucket to reasure my seal. I do place in plastic trash bags, and have lately placed water softener salt(It's just 99.8% salt in a pellet form) on the bottom then placed in the bag with sugar in the trash bag to help with moisture and have salt stored as well. For long term that I will not be getting into often, I use the orange lids from home depot or somewhere with the strip to remove to unseal. I have the shorter term buckets with gama lids. My intent is to refill to short term with the long term and just reuse the gama lids.


Also in the ethnic section of grocery stores they sell what I call "Mexican Sugar" it's hard as a rock and kind of brown in a cone shape. I have tried using this with a food grater and it works fine. It has a better flavor for coffe IMO than white sugar(calling it white as in color) tastes like light brown sugar. They store GREAT.
 
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I've been storing sugar for years in five gallon buckets with and with out mylar bags. The only difference I have had in the result is the sugar not in mylar becomes a solid mass that can be broken up. I guess if i threw in some dessicant it would make a difference but the sugar is still fine with out it.
 

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Overkill.

I was guilty of overkill when I first started storing years ago.

Salt and sugar are definitely the 2 items that get overkilled the most. Dump your sugar or salt in a food grade bucket that has been sanitized and seal it with an airtight lid. Sealing them in Mylar bags works to if you want smaller sizes. I just go with 5 gal pails.

I opened a bucket that was sealed 7 years ago and it was perfectly fine. Of course I didn't do a chemical analysis, but it worked and tasted fine.

Yes, the rumor of not using O2 removers is true. Unless you want to make a sugar sculpture.
 

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Old Hounds Smell Good
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Overkill is common...most of us have done it.

Sugar is good to go for pretty much eternity. Seriously...it breaks down chemically over such long time spans that I'm sure archaeologists will be digging it up in a few thousand years and smiling on TV while they make futuristic kool-aid with it.

The problem isn't the sugar...it is the containers.

Plastics of all kinds break down and seep chemistry into the sugar over time. Mylar does it less than most things. Plastic buckets do it to varying degrees but direct contact with the plastic is usually not desirable for long term preps.

Most economical and least impactful way to store it for LTS is probably to leave it in the paper wrapping, dump 3 to 4 of the 10 lb bags into one of the huge mylar bags and seal it up. Store it on a shelf somewhere and you should be fine.

Second best is leave it in the paper and dump 4 of them 10 lb'ers into a rubbermaid and stack it up. More chance of moisture but sugar just needs grating then.

Vac Sealing is also find it is just more likely to get a pin hole at some point and you'll use more material probably than fitting 3 or 4 into one of the giant mylar bags.
 

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that's like, your opinion
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I opened up some and set some in their bags, the open ones I have marked 1st and the others 2nd. I use the desecant to pull out the moisture since water is 2 parts oxygen. I seal with a small bead of oil to seal the O-ring in the 5 gallon bucket to reasure my seal. I do place in plastic trash bags, and have lately placed water softener salt(It's just 99.8% salt in a pellet form) on the bottom then placed in the bag with sugar in the trash bag to help with moisture and have salt stored as well. For long term that I will not be getting into often, I use the orange lids from home depot or somewhere with the strip to remove to unseal. I have the shorter term buckets with gama lids. My intent is to refill to short term with the long term and just reuse the gama lids.


Also in the ethnic section of grocery stores they sell what I call "Mexican Sugar" it's hard as a rock and kind of brown in a cone shape. I have tried using this with a food grater and it works fine. It has a better flavor for coffe IMO than white sugar(calling it white as in color) tastes like light brown sugar. They store GREAT.
mexican sugar eh... i though that was cocaine... do you have a whole lot of energy after you drink that coffee?
 

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All you need to store sugar is to be able to protect it from moisture (this is why an O2 absorber doesn't work, it adds moisture) and insects. You can use buckets, mylar, or just about anything that is airtight. If it's humid there, you might want to include some desiccant to keep it from clumping in storage.
 

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Also in the ethnic section of grocery stores they sell what I call "Mexican Sugar" it's hard as a rock and kind of brown in a cone shape. I have tried using this with a food grater and it works fine. It has a better flavor for coffe IMO than white sugar(calling it white as in color) tastes like light brown sugar. They store GREAT.
That's piloncillo, also called cone sugar. This is how all sugar was once sold. Raw sugar made into cones and scraped off as needed. I really like it for it's historic value and taste.
 
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