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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hunting season is here, and I have been thinking about my firearm setup. How many people have more then 1 rifle per caliber? What is the point of stockpiling ammo, and then have 1 rifle that could break? Sure people have spare parts, but spare parts do not help your buddies hunt with you.

Part of my plans call for a worse case situation, meaning I have friends or family members show up at my front door with nothing but clothes. The food starts to run out, so we head to the camp to plant a garden and do some hunting.

What firearms do you have that you can hand to a friend or family member and say “here ya go”? Its easy to pick up a spare 22 rifle from time to time, but its another thing to have 2 or 3 rifles in 308 or 30-30.

In my opinion, a well rounded plan should include the ability to provide assistance to other members of your group. Shooting ability, size of the game, shooting experience,,,, should all be considered.


Hunting after SHTF

In my eyes, hunting after some kind of SHTF / TEOTWAWKI event will be divided into 2 categories – large/medium and small game.

Depending on where you live, that will define what caliber and types of ammo you need. Someone living in Alaska will probably need a different caliber then someone in the south hunting thin skinned whitetail deer. But regardless of where you live, small game is small game. The difference between a Georgia squirrel and a Colorado squirrel is not going to be very much.

Lets say that some kind of worse case situation happens. There is some kind of new viral outbreak, society has broken down, stores no longer have food,,,. A few weeks later your close friends and family members show up at your house looking for help. Because your food supplies are running low, the decision is made to bug out to the remote camp, plant a garden and start hunting.

You get to the camp, get up the next morning, instruct one of the adults to get in a deer stand overlooking a field. The problem is, the adult does not have a rifle. What spare rifle do you have that you can hand someone to hunt with? Do you have a spare 243, spare 30-30, spare 270, spare 280/7mm express, spare 308, spare SKS in 7.62×39, spare 30-06,,,,?

One of the problems with stockpiling firearms and ammo for a SHTF survival situation, people usually buy a variety of firearms. A lot of people might stock spare bolt assemblies for the AR-15, but that does not help with the bolt action 308. With 2 identical firearms, you have a complete set of spare parts. This is why its important for groups to discuss what types and caliber of firearms to buy before purchases are made.



Teamwork

Several years ago a buddy of mine and I talked about buying matching firearms. After much debate we decided to get a Ruger mini-30. Even though we had already bought various other firearms, we decided it would be in the best interest of the group if we would have a couple of matching firearms. The Mini-30 was picked because we were already stockpiling 7.62×39 for the SKS, the mini-30 was easy to shoot, and it was made in the USA.

Besides rifles like the Mini-30 and the SKS, there are all kinds of military surplus rifles that are not expensive and can be found just about anywhere.

MAS 49/56
Mosin Nagant
Swiss K-31 Rifle Schmidt Rubin
SAIGA- 12
CETME
M-76 Sporter Rifle
WASR-10 AK47
And various other rifle and shotguns.

Communicate with your group, and groups in your area, discuss what would be the best caliber for the size game in your area and go from there.

A buddy of mine from decades ago had an old German 8mm bolt action rifle. The 8mm would be plenty for deer and hog sized game in our neck of the woods, but I do not know if those rifles are still on the market.



Considerations

Before making a group purchase, keep in mind the 30-06 is about the largest caliber the majority of people can shoot effectively. Because of this, I suggest people look at something in the 308 range before going to the 30-06.

Will the firearm be used by certain people in the group, or the will the firearm be used by the majority of the people? Can the majority of the people in the group shoot a 30-30 effectively, or how about a 308, or a 300 Winchester magnum.

What is the largest game animal in the area, is it deer, antelope, grizzly, black bear, polar bear, hogs, mule deer, elk, moose,,,, or something else? Always use a caliber that is well suited for taking the animal in an effective and humane manner. In other words, always use enough gun to get the job done.



Calibers and Rifles


22 long rifle – Ruger 10/22 or Marlin model 60.

223 – AR-15, Mini-14, Remington 770, Remington model 700, Weatherby Vanguard, Mossberg ATR, Spikes Tactical, BCM,,.

30-30 – Marlin 336, Mossberg 464, Winchester 94.

Just about all other calibers – There are too many brand names, makes and models to list them all, but here are a few Remington 770, Remington model 700, Weatherby Vanguard, Mossberg ATR, Remington R-15, Sako, Savage, Winchester, Springfield Armory, Browning,,,, too many to list.

Back in the 1990s, a buddy of mine and I talked about stocking up on SKSs, and then handing out an SKS to whoever needs a rifle. With the prices of SKSs going through the roof, that is no longer an option.

A few years ago Remington introduced the Model 770, which is bolt action and includes a factory mounted scope that has been bore sighted. At a price of around $299 – $350, its not going to break the bank. If you are looking for an economy rifle, the Remington 770 is going to be difficult to beat.



Don’t buy junk

When the life of you and your family are on the line, there is no excuse to buy bottom of the barrel survival gear. If / when SHTF, do you want a firearm that has been proven and reliable, or do you want something that jams ever few rounds.

But on the other hand, there is no reason to buy the most expensive products on the market.

There comes a point when the extra cost does not justify a better quality product.

Some of the popular gun magazines on the market rarely mention, much less recommend anything but top of the line. This also means the most expensive. Instead of talking about $400 – $700 rifles, those magazines talk about $1,200, $1,300 and $1,400 rifles.

Why buy a $1,400 rifle, when a $400 rifle will do just as good? Why fork out $1,400 on a single rifle, when you can get 3 $400 rifles + ammo, or 2 $600 rifles + ammo.

But as stated before, do not buy bottom of the barrel junk.

Do your research, and get the best value for your budget.

Stockpiling Ammunition

My family stocks about 9 different types of rifle ammunition – 22 long rifle, 22 magnum, 223, 7.62×39, 30-30, 270, 280, 308 and 30-06. I think that is the major calibers we shoot, but a couple might have been overlooked.

Wouldn’t it have been easier to agree on a couple of standard calibers and focus on those, instead of having such a wide variety. But that is what happens over the decades, someone picks up a rifle here, another rifle there, another one for Christmas, another one for a birthday,,,,,. Before long you have an array of calibers on hand.

There is nothing wrong with having a wide selection of rifles and calibers, but for the sake of stockpiling ammo for SHTF, try to focus on 2 or 3 calibers.

Small sized game – 22 long rifle, 22 magnum

Defensive round – 223 and 7.62×39

Medium sized game – 30-30, 270, 280, 308, 30-06,,,,,.

For the small game rifles and rifles in the defensive category the options seem to be pretty straight forward, either a Ruger 10/22, Marlin model 60, AR-15, AK-47, Mini-14 or Mini-30. There are lots of other options, but those the ones that most people use.

I think its when the larger calibers come into play is when most of the variety kicks-in. There are so many good quality rifles, and so many proven rounds on the market it’s difficult not to collect different rifles and calibers over the years.
 

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The Lord's Servant
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Very good advice here Kev, and I appreciate it. I have been tempted to buy different guns from time to time that would be a new caliber from what I have. But I have stuck to the calibers I have because I'm confident in those calibers to get the job done that is needed, thus that has allowed me to buy more than one type of gun of the caliber I already have so I can have parts if/when it breaks down.
 

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I follow the same principle. We have multiple .38 revolvers, 2 45 autos and a 1917 S&W, sks's and ak's and a M1A and a .308 hunting rifle. The only gun that doesn't have a second one in the same caliber is my AR which was bought more for training the family on how to use one if they come across one post shtf since they're so common around here.
 

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The 22 rifle is a good idea. However the Marlin is a bit slow to reload.

With the mosin nagant 91/30s being sold for $100 out the door at local gunshows, 2 or three of them might be worth picking up if you have the funds.
One of the local area dealers has been selling them with a 440 tin of ammo for $200. That is also not a bad deal.
 

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Life, Liberty,& Happiness
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I personally stick with 40 s&w for pistols, 12 gauge for scattershot, 22 lr for small game, 5.56/223 for MBR, and 308 for long guns. Bout the only thing I could do different is switch the pistols over to 9mm but I don't like them.
 

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Great post overall, I have just one thought...

One of the problems with stockpiling firearms and ammo for a SHTF survival situation, people usually buy a variety of firearms. A lot of people might stock spare bolt assemblies for the AR-15, but that does not help with the bolt action 308. With 2 identical firearms, you have a complete set of spare parts. This is why its important for groups to discuss what types and caliber of firearms to buy before purchases are made.
Sure, having duplicate weapons is great for arming a group but the concept that a spare weapon is a spare parts bin is illogical because it doesn't actually solve the problem of a broken part. Think of it like this, you have two of the same rifles and both of them work, then one of them breaks a firing pin. Why on earth would it make sense to take the firing pin out of the rifle that works? You had two rifles and now you just have one, no matter what you do.

Doesn't it just make more sense to keep spare parts for all of your SHTF weapons? I keep at least 2 spares of all the parts that are most likely to break such as extractors, ejectors, firing pins, recoil springs and then at least one complete set of springs, bolts, and/or pins.

YMMV, but spare parts are much cheaper than a spare weapon!
 

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great post.

i have a family of five and up until last week i had a very limited budget to work with, and that is reflected in my "plan".

of the five, one is still too young to shoot currently. my plan was to decide on 4 calibers using cost of ammo, cost of firearm, and availability to ME. i chose 7.62x54r, 22lr, 9mm carbine, and 12 ga. the idea is to have a minimum of 4 firearms of each caliber (handguns too for 22lr and 9mm).

these firearms are fairly reasonably priced, as well as the ammo. i would like to have way more than 4 22's and 4 mosins, though.

as of the last week i have changed assignments at my job and my pay has nearly doubled so my plan will reflect this. i am now searching for a semi auto rifle option of at least .223 to start purchasing. price is still a concern, but i feel that i need at least one semi auto rifle caliber larger than the 9mm.

if i get a good deal on something useful thats not on my list i take it. it couldnt hurt. it could be considered a throwaway, or used for barter(or to trade for one in my list).

anyway, this should give me plenty of options for spare parts or have enough firearms to equip the family and have a few to hand out if need be.

this is my plan, and i sure hope it works if it has to be implemented.
 

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These are what I buy and reload and have on hand. I have a “Few” at any given time..:thumb:
22
25 auto
9mm
.327FedMag
.357Mag
44Mag
40s&w
45acp
.223
8mm
7.62X39
308
30-06
270
30/30



"We might as well give up and run…. If we let them take our God and Guns….."
 

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I wish I had a little more spare change. I'd be buying up more of those $199 Yugo SKS rifles from Cabelas for trade use.

Post EOTW how much would one of those be worth in trade kitted up with a mag and 200 rds.?
 

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first class white trash
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I wish I had a little more spare change. I'd be buying up more of those $199 Yugo SKS rifles from Cabelas for trade use.

Post EOTW how much would one of those be worth in trade kitted up with a mag and 200 rds.?
thanks for the tip. that is exactly what i have been looking for.
 

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I've been working on spare parts for our hunting rifles. We kept them with the same manufacturer, Remington 700s. Parts for her 243 and my 308 cross over almost 100 percent. Something else to think about when buying rifles and pistols.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yesterday, while hunting with my uncle and his family and my dad, I had one of those "thats pretty cool" moments.

My uncles step-son had a Rossi single shot 243 with a scope. Looking at google, it seems that a Rossi single shot sells for around $200 + price of scope. Lets say $300 for a complete package with a Bushnell scope.

For $300, that seems like a pretty good deal for a hand out weapon.

But then again, a Marlin 336 with a scope sells for $400.

I guess a lot of it boils down to a persons budget, and what they can afford to invest into spare firearms. If nothing else, its something for the grandkids to shoot later on.
 

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Stockpiling rifles & shotguns

We live on about 9 acres in the country. My neighbor owns all of the land around me. If a bunch of you city folk come out here hunting, you are likely to get hunted in return. We live out here for a reason, and it's not to feed the populations of nearby cities who come wandering out here thinking they can live on wildlife who live on our land, which is posted as no trespassing. Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We live on about 9 acres in the country. My neighbor owns all of the land around me. If a bunch of you city folk come out here hunting, you are likely to get hunted in return.
Where did this come from?

We are talking about stockpiling firearms, not looting.
 

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Myself and the other two members of my small group all have the same exact PDR in the same cartridge. It is that way because I bought all three and gave them two. They also have the same exact PDH while I have several others, but we all use the same cartridge for the PDH that we will be carrying.

This means that not only will we have spares that interchange, but if they have to pickup my rifle, or I pick up theirs, we will be familiar with that rifle because it is just like ours. No cross training required there.

Both are extremely popular chamberings and firearms, so spare ammo and spare parts are plentiful. I will say it is better to have spare parts than a completely spare rifle of the same make/model. Parts are lot less expensive and easier to carry than a whole other rifle, and you aren't going to want to cannibalize one working rifle to fix one that isn't - you'll just pick up that spare and use it instead.

Extra firearms?

Sure, most preppers have more firearms than they or their group personally need - but as mentioned there will be others who come along who can use them. With few exceptions, most of my close relatives are not into prepping and do not have many, if any firearms. They do know I have a few, but I doubt any of them with a few exceptions have any idea how much I have. The spares are those I have bought over the years that intrigued me or would be fun to own, or that I thought would be nice to have for prepping - and then the ones I inherited.

I would also bring up the idea of "stash" firearms. Inexpensive but sturdy firearms that may not be your first go to gun, but that would serve in a pinch. For example, the Lee Enfield SMLE rifles in either .303 or .308 (Ishapore) are decent inexpensive fast handling robust bolt action rifles that are plentiful. They can be easily and inexpensively be modified to a Scout rifle:



IMO there are at least three good uses for a "stash rifle":

1) To stash somewhere in a cache. Either along some route you would use to bug out, or close enough to some BOL or where you live. Why? Because maybe you bug out from work and come home to find your primary residence overrun with "zombies", or burnt to the ground, or traffic/flood/toxic spill means you can't get to your home. Maybe all you have in your GHB is a handgun. Maybe you get robbed, either your home or you personally.

For whatever reason, you may not be able to get to your first choice PDR, or it may be taken away from you. A stash rifle is a good backup - assuming there is a field load of ammo with it (which should be in a well sealed container).

2) Gun confiscation. Unlikely, but theoretically possible, especially in a SHTF situation. Having a backup if confiscation catches you by surprise, is a good thing.

If it ever comes to that, it is more likely that those doing the confiscating would confiscate an AK than an old SMLE or WWII era Mauser that looks like a hunting rifle. They may take both, or they may leave you your "hunting rifle".

Also, if you have enough warning, and your situation allows, you may want to stash your AK/AR/etc. someplace safe but still want a capable PDR. A lever or fast bolt action is still something for attackers to contend with - if you are allowed to keep it. If you aren't, then the fact that the BATF took your $200 SMLE isn't going to hurt near as much as them taking a tricked out AK or AR.

3) As you are bugging out, you may meet people you want to take with you, who for whatever reason either have no PDR or something inadequate for the job. Having a stash along your bug out routes allows you to supply them with either a PDR or PDH, or both, and now your group is that much stronger.
 

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Yesterday, while hunting with my uncle and his family and my dad, I had one of those "thats pretty cool" moments.

My uncles step-son had a Rossi single shot 243 with a scope. Looking at google, it seems that a Rossi single shot sells for around $200 + price of scope. Lets say $300 for a complete package with a Bushnell scope.

For $300, that seems like a pretty good deal for a hand out weapon.

But then again, a Marlin 336 with a scope sells for $400.

I guess a lot of it boils down to a persons budget, and what they can afford to invest into spare firearms. If nothing else, its something for the grandkids to shoot later on.
I inherited a Finnish Mosin Nagant. Since I have no interest in it, I gave it to a relative. Personally, I would rather hand out something more common that uses the same ammo I use, like an Ishapore Enfield, which is still inexpensive and a better rifle IMO.

A person can go to a gun show and pick up a number of used surplus rifles. They can also pickup some bargains on other used firearms - like a used Marlin .22LR bolt action. If you anticipate a large group of people joining you that don't have firearms and may not have firearms training or experience, a good place to start them would be a bolt action .22 LR. The ammo is cheap and plentiful and the firearm easy to learn with and quiet.

My first choice for someone who has no firearms, whether SHTF or not, is a .22 rimfire rifle of some sort. My first choice for a handout would also be a .22 rimfire rifle for pretty much the same reason. They can learn, they can hunt, they will be safer than with an AK/AR, and pretty much everyone should have one anyway even if they have an AK/AR (maybe they decided to leave their .22 rimfire at home when they bugged out).
 

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We live on about 9 acres in the country. My neighbor owns all of the land around me. If a bunch of you city folk come out here hunting, you are likely to get hunted in return. We live out here for a reason, and it's not to feed the populations of nearby cities who come wandering out here thinking they can live on wildlife who live on our land, which is posted as no trespassing. Thank you
Yours is a random post but I'm glad you mentioned this. I was planning on seducing some of the local Kansas sheep population for companionship.
 
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