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If this has been discussed before im sorry. Last night I was thinking about all the preps I have made (food, water, the list goes on and on) but what about those extra parts for your BOV. So today I went and bought extra belts, hoses, fuel filters, anti-freeze, oil and filters (enough for 2 changes), thermostat, a case of gear oil and a few other things I thought would be helpful in the event of having to leave the homestead. Just wondering if anyone else has done this also?
 

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I think about that, and similar things all the time!

The problem for me is that I'm not mechanically inclined - so aside from changing a belt or a battery, I wouldn't have the first idea what to do in a car.

I think that's the biggest problem I've run in to being a survivalist. It's almost like building a house - you could easily get swept away & overwhelmed by all of the little details.

In a way, you almost have to become semi-knowledgeable in all of the areas you currently rely on others for. Who can do that? Not me.

I pick and choose my battles - I know what I can do & what I can't so I focus on the things I know I can pull off - and hope for the best elsewhere! :eek:

Didn't mean to get on a tangent there. Sorry.
 

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Like MacGyver, but w/guns
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I keep fluids, tools, and wheels for my car. Storing parts for my car would be incredibly inefficient. Most of the car has slim odds of breaking and parts for it are very expensive. I do all my own work and know my car pretty intimately. This keeps costs down and helps me know when it's time to replace things.

My mentality behind this is that if shtf, all the logistics needed to maintain a vehicle will be too difficult to make it worth it. If the shtf turns into eotwawki your still not gonna need your car cause you won't have anything to keep it running. If shtf goes back to normal, then you fix your car and top off the tank. My car is like my computer. It is a great tool and pleasantly convenient but I find no comfort in relying in them.

My bov is my boots or bicycle. So I would need extra shoelaces, socks, and an allen wrench for the bike.
 

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Veritas Aequitas
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Don't think of this just in terms of bugging out either. What if you bug in, but you want to get your vehicle running after a year or so of sitting in a garage? Needs pretty much all fluids changed, some Sta Bil treated gas, perhaps a new or recharged battery, etc. It is no small feat to get a car running that has been in storage.

What if you found a car and you wanted to get THAT car running after quite some time. Same deal...you need to keep this stuff on hand whether you are bugging out or in.
 

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I have always gone on extended remote camping and back road touring trips. As a result of the remoteness of the trips, I have always carried spare parts, all hoses, filters, alternator, starter, water pump, regulator, ignition parts, bearings, u-joints ( you get the idea). It has saved me twice, alternator and fuel filter. I think that we should all have the basic spare parts in stock. The cost, relative to the cost of your car is minimal.
I also keep all my old parts ( break disks, drums, pads ect.), while they need to be replaced, most still have some service life left.
 

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I <3 FAR 43
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Being somewhat of a trail crawler kinda guy myself, with my '79 Bronco, and thinking of the snaps, bends and tweaks I've had, I'd say that U-joints would be a good idea to have around.

Lots of U-joints.

Most of the hose and belt type stuff really shouldnt be an issue with proper maintenance.
 
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