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I'll bring the rope.
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I got mine, Cipro and another broad spectrum-type, from a coworker. Her parents were visiting from India and I put in an order. They are rediculously inexpensive (like $3.50 for 1 course) but I do not know the quality. They look to be the same as American, but were obviously made in India, so I'm a little dubious.

If I suddenly begin posting in Hindi, you will know that I have failed.
 

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Free Mason
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Most prescriptions for antibiotics have the ability to be refilled once. After the first round you can get the refill and put it on the shelf. They mark the shelf life as one year. I think that would make it two years in reality. IMHO.
 

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The types of antibiotics to store is a huge topic and highly patient variable due to allergies etc. But generally- skin coverage for cellulitis typically keflex or clindamycin (if allergic to penicillin), levaquin or augmentin for pneumonia, sinusitis, ear infections, cipro for uti and cipro and flagyl for abdominal infections. I believe levaquin would also cover most tick borne diseases such as lyme but would have to check in to be sure; and it does cover for exposure to inhaled anthrax.

Keep in cool dry place with little temperature variation for longest life. Usual life is 1-2 years...but who really knows.
 

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It must be remembered that these are also controlled substances. Unless you have some sort of medical training beyond that of First Responder, it's probably a good idea to stick to what you can buy off the shelf. The simple reality is that some of this stuff can really harm a person when handled and dealt with by individuals who don't have sufficient education in the prescription and handling of medications.

The last thing you want to have in the situations we often discuss on this board is feelings of guilt becuase you killed someone in your family due to overzealousness with stocking dangerous items.

Just my $.02
 

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Drug expiration dates? Do they really mean anything? I myself dont put much weight on food expiration dates, I know its mostly a liability issue and marketing ploy, so I started thinking what about all my meds and vitamins in storage? Ive asked doctors and researched this. The overwelming conclusion for me is that most medicines and drugs are good even years after their expiration date. A few medicines can become toxic after a long period, like aspirin, So one should really research their medications thoroughly if they are expired just to be safe. But most drugs are good years after their dates. Here is a short article about a study on drug expiration dates.

http://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update1103a.shtml
 

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Back from the grind...
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Watch out... some of the antibiotics listed above are outrageously expensive...

Levoquin (levofloxacin) is probably about $100 per pill...

Augmentin remains quite pricey as well...

Sure these can probably be had at some south-of-the-border "pharmacy" (I use the term loosely). You might even get them at a "discounted" rate...

But consider that when the SHTF part of the reason may be because of antibiotic resistance... Overzealous prescribers like those who give refills on their scrips are contributing to a climate where antibiotics may not work any more because all the the bacteria have become "used to" all of the pills! That could lead to normally very treatable infections raging out of control.

Save your cash and stock up on soap. Handwashing is a very effective way to avoid an infection in the first place... An ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure...

No, I'm not a doctor... I don't play one on TV... and I've never even been to a Holiday Inn Express...
 

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Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor and have no advanced medical training -

There are quite a few people that order fish antibiotics for shtf storage. I personally know several people that have successfully taken fish antibiotics for various problems without ill effect. They come in pill form and look just like normal "people" antibiotics". My understanding is that they don't go through the same testing process as "people" antibiotics so keep that in mind.

Just throwing it out there.
 

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If you know someone that works at a family practice or general practice doctor's office they generally keep some antibiotics on hand as samples that they get free from drug reps. I have gotten Augmentin and Biaxin this way and know they had Cipro as well.
 

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As a full time EMT, I agree with Axe. Skip the drugs, and stick to common sense prevention.
I too agree that prevention is best but for those people who are prone to certain infections, it might be prudent to have something around for an emergency...like if someone is prone to ear infections, utis, pneumonia etc. Not advising people to stock up and become their own doctor, rather have some essentials kicking around for the run of the mill infections that are easily recognized and treated.
 

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Survivor
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I got mine, Cipro and another broad spectrum-type, from a coworker. Her parents were visiting from India and I put in an order. They are rediculously inexpensive (like $3.50 for 1 course) but I do not know the quality. They look to be the same as American, but were obviously made in India, so I'm a little dubious.

If I suddenly begin posting in Hindi, you will know that I have failed.
i also use ciproflaxin (sp) and have used it for infections from the ear to infected cuts and it has worked very well... even as pills expire dont throw them away... they lose effectiveness over time but they will still help. keep it in something airtight.
 

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Prepared Gourmet
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It has been years since I had or needed any antibiotics, however, I do want, when I visit my doctor soon for my once yearly prescription renewal appointment, to ask her to prescribe some antibiotic for use in case of a dental abcess or the like. I am allergic to penicillin and as I vaguely recall, from many decades ago (so this may be moot now with newer drugs on the market) I also didn't do well with sulfa drugs.

Does anyone know what kind of antibiotic might serve the above (dental) situation, for me with my 'allergies'? Don't expect you to be a doctor, diagnosing .. so please don't think that - but many of you do seem to have more knowledge about this topic than I do. I will do my own research anyway, and of course, I still need the doctor to prescribe (not going to order out of country), but, if I can ask directly for a particular antibiotic or even type of antibiotic, it might all go faster. Thanks.
 

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LASSIE! (I did it again)
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It has been years since I had or needed any antibiotics, however, I do want, when I visit my doctor soon for my once yearly prescription renewal appointment, to ask her to prescribe some antibiotic for use in case of a dental abcess or the like. I am allergic to penicillin and as I vaguely recall, from many decades ago (so this may be moot now with newer drugs on the market) I also didn't do well with sulfa drugs.

Does anyone know what kind of antibiotic might serve the above (dental) situation, for me with my 'allergies'? Don't expect you to be a doctor, diagnosing .. so please don't think that - but many of you do seem to have more knowledge about this topic than I do. I will do my own research anyway, and of course, I still need the doctor to prescribe (not going to order out of country), but, if I can ask directly for a particular antibiotic or even type of antibiotic, it might all go faster. Thanks.

Keflex(cephlasporin/cephalexin) is the drug of choice with people who are allergic to penicillin, although there is a possible cross allergic reaction, roughly 10% of the population if I remember correctly.
You want to be extremely careful taking any of the "clindamycin" family of anibiotics. If the person takes too much or has a pre-existing condition it can lead to ulcerative colitis.
IF you ever find yourself having to take antibiotics without professional overview, please be circumspect as it can truly turn into a situation where "the cure is worse than the disease".
 

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Keflex(cephlasporin/cephalexin) is the drug of choice with people who are allergic to penicillin, although there is a possible cross allergic reaction, roughly 10% of the population if I remember correctly.
You want to be extremely careful taking any of the "clindamycin" family of anibiotics. If the person takes too much or has a pre-existing condition it can lead to ulcerative colitis.
".
There are some cephalosporin antibiotics that can be taken safely if allergic to penicillin, however keflex should be avoided. Part of keflex is very similar to amoxicillin and can induce the same type of allergic reaction. Basically, if you have a type I allergy ie anaphylaxis....stay away from cephalosporins if you can.
 
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