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With all the bad financial news...Foreclosures, banks, etc. failing, I got to wondering just how bad the stock market is compared, historically, to other years.

Areal eye opener

I'll admit I'm not any way a finance guy, just was curious>>>

http://stockcharts.com/charts/historical/

Ps, I believe this is as of 19 September, but you can run down the cart to what the market is today to get an ideal.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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thats a EOTWAWKI number right there- seriously
 

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It was 1,000 in 1987, which doesn't seem that long ago.

The "experts" I heard over the last two days are predicting 8,000. But, I don't put much stock in these talking heads. The market isn't predictable, other than to say it will be highly volatile.
 

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Back in '02 it went down to 7286... It has a long way to go before an EOTWAWKI situation. However- this being a global crisis and given some other factors- it could become one rather rapidly. I wouldn't start panicking until we start seeing 1000pt drops in a day or a halt to trading. MHO.
 

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Just a couple of points I wanted to mention.

First, when people talk about the stock market being 1000 in 1987 or 7200 in 2002, don't forget that being at 1000 or 7200 several years ago is different than being at those levels today because of inflation. In other words, being at 7200 today would be worst than being at 7200 in 2002.

Second, I don't believe it will get too much lower. It may get down to 8000, but it looks like Ben Bernanke's got the printing presses working overtime now to try and patch the dam that is leaking. I do think long term because of the debt added to the already out of control US national debt that will cause a much more serious decline. Because of that, I actually think this is a good time to buy since you can get some great deals right now.

Finally, as I mentioned in the last paragraph, I think the US national debt and what's been added to it because of the bailouts and weakened US economy(and therefore lower tax revenues) will ultimately be what brings about another great depression. I believe this because at some point the US government won't be able to tax enough people to pay for the interest on the money it's already borrowed plus entitlement spending plus all the other government programs. So I think the more interesting question to bring up is when do you think that will happen and who will bailout the government?
 

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To the Liberty Tree!
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I think that the suckers rally starts today. Hopefully we will get a decent bounce from it then it's back down again. We are probably not too far off from a bottom.
 

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NRA Instructor-Ohio CCW
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We are undoubtedly in a bear market. bear markets end when selling is exhausted and everyone has given up. We aren't even close to that point.
I think that the suckers rally starts today. Hopefully we will get a decent bounce from it then it's back down again. We are probably not too far off from a bottom.
 

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Destroyer of Ignorance
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Those charts don't tell us a damned thing. Not one of the charts is adjusted for inflation. The US Dollar has lost 30% of it's value in just the last couple of years. That means that even if the Dow stayed even over the same time frame, it would have lost 30% of its real value.

The point is, we could have a complete Dow meltdown and it wouldn't even show up on a chart if the chart didn't compensate for inflation. In 1913 the Dow was about 62.50. Today it's at 9,198.50 but the US Dollar has lost 98% of it's value over that time. With an adjusted chart, the Dow would look much different than the charts shown on your link.
 

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NRA Instructor-Ohio CCW
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Inflation really isn't a part of THIS equation. Most investors have been in the market for a maximum of 20 years. Over that period of time, inflation has had a negligible effect.
 

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Govt economists and Wall Street economist will tell you inflation has a had a "negligible effect". Other people disagree vehemently. Decide who you want to trust.
 

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I say again, LOOK AT THESE CHARTS... one of 'em is from MSN, the other from CNN.

http://moneycentral.msn.com/detail/stock_quote?ipage=qdi&Symbol=$INDU

http://money.cnn.com/data/markets/dow/

The sidebar says the days low was 9045.76

The chart shows a lowpoint of perhaps 9095 on the MSN chart, and 9105 on the CNN chart.

Is 9045 too close to 9000? Is 9000 some really bad marker for the wall street guys? I mean I know the number is there, but perhaps people generally just look at the chart. If you just look at the chart, you might say "Well, we dipped below 9100 for a second, but then we rebounded..." I can't figure out such a obvious discrepancy.

EDIT: If you check the days high, 9448.14 it matches much better with the chart... why not the low? I am creeped out by this.. big time.
EQV
 

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I've noticed this in the past with google finance. My guess is that those charts are not showing an instantaneous value of the market, but a 5 or 10 minute average.

I say again, LOOK AT THESE CHARTS... one of 'em is from MSN, the other from CNN.

http://moneycentral.msn.com/detail/stock_quote?ipage=qdi&Symbol=$INDU

http://money.cnn.com/data/markets/dow/

The sidebar says the days low was 9045.76

The chart shows a lowpoint of perhaps 9095 on the MSN chart, and 9105 on the CNN chart.

Is 9045 too close to 9000? Is 9000 some really bad marker for the wall street guys? I mean I know the number is there, but perhaps people generally just look at the chart. If you just look at the chart, you might say "Well, we dipped below 9100 for a second, but then we rebounded..." I can't figure out such a obvious discrepancy.

EDIT: If you check the days high, 9448.14 it matches much better with the chart... why not the low? I am creeped out by this.. big time.
EQV
 

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It,s the overall plan I am concerned about, not the upping and downing of a red line.
the strategic actions of those people concerning the fall of the world,s Financial institutions, and the uprise of a One World financial sytem has repurcussions that far outweigh whether Iron ore or gold is up or down.
 
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