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rather die on my feet
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293 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://gotenna.com/

Just saw this and thought if it works as they say they do it might be worth the money to stay in touch at your Bol. If you cant click the link it basically says you can keep in touch with just text as long as the other person has the same antenna. No wifi or signal needed.

Thoughts?

I am in no way affiliated with this company or product.
 

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reluctant sinner
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17,912 Posts
I just got my Technician ticket to be a ham radio operator. My $40 2 meter rig will do voice that distance. With repeaters the range can be 100's on miles. I just built my first J-pole antenna. Will be putting it up this weekend. I am also working on taking the next test General and perhaps Extra so I can do world wide stuff on better radios. No Morris Code skills required anymore.

http://www.radioddity.com/us/baofeng-uv-5r-plus-earphone-136-174-400-480mhz-two-way-radio.html I have 2 of them. I got a spare battery, a AA adapter, a car charger and magnetic base antenna, the programming cable and a better rubber duck antenna from those people. My first one was programed by a real ham. I managed to clone the second one with the free CHIRP software. Get my Samsung to load the correct driver for the cable was painful.


$15 to take the test. Practice exam are here. http://www.eham.net/exams/

73
 

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rather die on my feet
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293 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just got my Technician ticket to be a ham radio operator. My $40 2 meter rig will do voice that distance. With repeaters the range can be 100's on miles. I just built my first J-pole antenna. Will be putting it up this weekend. I am also working on taking the next test General and perhaps Extra so I can do world wide stuff on better radios. No Morris Code skills required anymore.

http://www.radioddity.com/us/baofeng-uv-5r-plus-earphone-136-174-400-480mhz-two-way-radio.html I have 2 of them. I got a spare battery, a AA adapter, a car charger and magnetic base antenna, the programming cable and a better rubber duck antenna from those people. My first one was programed by a real ham. I managed to clone the second one with the free CHIRP software. Get my Samsung to load the correct driver for the cable was painful.


$15 to take the test. Practice exam are here. http://www.eham.net/exams/

73
Cheaper than I thought it was. Guess I will stick with radio. :thumb:
 

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reluctant sinner
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I have a lot less than $150 in my two radios and all the extra stuff, plus the test. I'd like to know how they figure their stuff is secure. Perhaps they think the NSA isn't listening, or their range is too short.
 

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The setup runs $150 and you can 3 new ham rigs for that. Plus it is running on the 151-154 MHz frequency range so it's going to have connectivity issues such as 2M simplex has - little to no range unless a better antenna is pressed into service.

After re-reading their ad i see that $150 is a 50% off pre-order. The actual price is $299.99 so again ham radio wins. You can get a really pepped up (60 watts) 2M mobile for half that price. Then there are the newer hand-helds that are dirt cheap. Plus you need a smart phone to operate the jewel.

So, if you're trying to stay off-grid as much as possible you don't want a smart phone ratting out your location.
 

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I'm looking at http://www.mobilinkd.com/tnc/.

I guess I'm cell phone bias. For $300 you could probably get set up to do some simple text message. Bluetooth to tnc to ham.

Its over my head to set up. Just thinking me and my friends would get the minimum licenses and paid apps. Anyone want to point to a how to on this.
 

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This thing has been floating around on every website for the past month, it's still a tiny little antenna, whats its max distance? It's an interesting concept for the iSheep out there who have no idea that a radio even still works or ever existed like my little sister who has had an iPhone for 5 years with no service and goes to McDonalds to text every day. The only thing it offers over a radio is small size. But until I've seen these things in use and hear there distance, battery life and reliability these aren't even a "I want to try it out" item for me. There is so much you can do already with your cell phone and a radio out there with just a little google-fu and some patience you can send pictures and text already using some programs from your phone to your radio just using speaker and mic. I'm pretty sure a cheap FRS/GMRS/MURS radio setup and the right program and you can do this same thing.
 

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Broadcaster
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I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the "I-thingies"
What we along the Gulf Coast discovered in the aftermath's of hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Ike was this:
  • All cell sites today have emergency generators with at least a 14-day fuel supply
  • Most cell sites on conventional lattice-type towers survived the storms, largely intact. Those sites on monopoles fared somewhat worse
  • Voice calls were often times problematic, if not impossible due to network congestion
  • By contrast, TEXT MESSAGES ALWAYS GOT THROUGH
  • But the sheeple were still unprepared, as most of them did not have vehicular chargers
  • Any mobile device which does not easily accommodate a battery change is apt to be at a disadvantage. All Batteries run down and all batteries eventually wear out. If you are without power, remember to use your 3-3-3 plan
 

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I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the "I-thingies"
What we along the Gulf Coast discovered in the aftermath's of hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Ike was this:
  • All cell sites today have emergency generators
  • Most cell sites survived the storms, largely intact
  • Voice calls were often times problematic, due to network congestion
  • By contrast, TEXT MESSAGES ALWAYS GOT THROUGH
  • But the sheeple were still unprepared, as most of them did not have vehicular chargers
I don't dismiss them at all mine is set up to do so much in any aftermath, BUT I have planned to not have any service at all and I work for that. Plan for the worst pray for the best. I have solar charger/battery, battery adapters for all my radios and my phone has a charger that I can put batteries in. But so many people think that the towers will stay up AND work. Ham repeater towers have backup generators with wind and solar as well and are not on any kind of grid so you have to "take them out" to make them go down, where the government can get on a computer and kill a cell tower at will.
 

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Buy a network of old Motorola i355's etc off ebay for secure comms at a fraction of the costs.
I keep reading about these things, but from what I understand is the only reason they are secure is they are digital trunked, which isn't actually a security feature if you have a digital trunk scanner. The range on them is 2 miles at best when off network. Seems they'd work great for internal squad comms but no distance on them for me, great price to get started with a semi secure radio though, again it's all about getting off the network/grids with some better distance for some good comms. Wouldn't mine playing with a couple of these in the near future myself, just not on the horizon right now.
 

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The i355s use MotoTalk iDEN. Which uses a frequency hoping scheme of 90ms each hop. This will prevent trivial easy dropping, but a sufficiently motivated 'Eve' should be able to de-hop the transmission and listen in.
 

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You could also go with the amateur radio HSMM-MESH. While maybe not as convenient as GoTenna, it is much more powerful. Essentially, wi-fi routers are re-programmed to be amateur radios and automatically create mesh networks with other "like-minded" routers. Your computer doesn't know the difference. And, if you go with a Ubiquiti Bullet router, there are a ton of antenna options out there to improve distance.

So, if you get creative, with a few Bullet routers, some high gain antennas, you can set up an entire LAN made up of wireless, mesh routers and run everything IP (computers, VoIP phones, video chats, ftp servers, etc). It's fascinating technology, and really cheap and easy to get into.

Here's the link: http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/index.php
 

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I am solidly behind the Baofeng UV-5Rs.
 
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Currently surviving SHTF
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The baofeng is king when you consider cost. Even with the stock rubber duck, I hit my local repeater from miles away with ease. Why type when you can talk? The baofeng enables use on 2 meter and 70 cm.

Set it to low power and the range (and likelyhood of interception) is reduced. Set it to transmit at one freq and receive another if you really want to make interception difficult ( example: transmit on 144.550 and listen to 149.950. Your buddy talks on 149.950 listens on 144.550). Not bulletproof but more difficult to hear the whole conversation.

The most recent UV5RA I bought was $32. With prices like this I plan to get 3-4 more.
 

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Storyteller
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New communication device for MURS service


Stowed


Extended

‘goTenna’ Communications Device - used with a smartphone

This new personal communications device operates in 150 MHz spectrum on the MURS service.

It’s is a device that’s about six inches long (expandable to eight-inches) and one-inch wide and is designed to allow long-range messaging directly with another goTenna without using a Wi-Fi or cellular data link.

The interface is an app that runs on a smartphone or tablet that connects to the goTenna via Bluetooth. The goTenna sends and receives messages using frequencies the 151 to 154 MHz MURS band. So, you need a smartphne to use this device.

Why does this excite me? Two-way data transmission is allowed with the MURS service.

The other services (FRS, GRMS, etc) allow data transmission only such things as selective calling. Continuous data transmission is not allowed, nor is packet forwarding.

One possible advantage the goTenna has over voice communications on the same frequencies is that it can keep trying to send a message until it receives an acknowledgment from the other unit. It also has the ability to store messages.

Sales are pending approval by the FCC.
If you want to check on FCC approval, goTenna's grantee code is: 2ABVK.

Source for information

A related device - Beartooth is also out there looking for FCC approval.

I'll keep an eye on this, could be good for a lot of things....
 

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Storyteller
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They claim long range but its a low powered VHF radio so a mile or two just like your murs radio....
Actually, it is your MURS radio - except digital And can be used for packet messaging.

I don't use an Andriod /smartpnoe, so I'll have t see how this can work with something else.... Pretty cool none-the-less.
 
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