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Great video! I usually just try to block the wind with whatever I have available (Bag, Hands, board) but I'll have to try this method out next time I'm camping.
 

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Really windy, means there won't be a fire. If it's safe I dig a shallow pit roughly fingertip to halfway up my forearm and sloped ( think in-ground pool). If I need it bigger I'll put a reflector up behind it to help keep the flames and embers contained.
 

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The unpredictability of wind there is no safe way to have any kind of fire. period.
Be in a depression where there is no wind period.
A long ways from the top of any mountain or hill side.
Always have water and dirt and shovel handy before starting the fire.
If some nit wit starts a fire, and runs away, and your stuff is burned up ,what is your recourse, post SHTF ?
 

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I did an experiment in my garage starting a controlled fire. I set up a fan on high blowing right next to my kindling pile. I used wet frozen sticks as kindling and a little bit of cotton as the tinder. I used my one inch long firesteel AND turned the lights off. The idea was to try and get fire started in darkness with wet and windy conditions and a poor combustion device. I ended up getting the cotton burning but it burnt too fast due to the fan and the sticks didn't catch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The unpredictability of wind there is no safe way to have any kind of fire. period.
Be in a depression where there is no wind period.
A long ways from the top of any mountain or hill side.
Always have water and dirt and shovel handy before starting the fire.
If some nit wit starts a fire, and runs away, and your stuff is burned up ,what is your recourse, post SHTF ?
again some times you need a fire when it's windy this is a good fire for windy conditions
It stops debris from blowing all over the place it's in the sas manualsurvival
 

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If you need the fire for warmth, Add another blanket, then wrap up in a piece of tarp to block the wind if you are cold. Fire and wind is dicey.
 

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great vid your getting pretty good at these videos you really dumb it down and make the subject easy to understand thanks for taking the time to share your knwledge with all of us your a good man for it
 

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If it's windy AND DRY, no fire at all. If it's windy AND WET, you can use a trench fire. Also, use wet logs on the windward side to block the wind. Take all precautions possible. But if the woods are dry from lack of recent rain, no fire should be chanced at all, even with no wind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If it's windy AND DRY, no fire at all. If it's windy AND WET, you can use a trench fire. Also, use wet logs on the windward side to block the wind. Take all precautions possible. But if the woods are dry from lack of recent rain, no fire should be chanced at all, even with no wind.
this is a survival forum and some times you need a fire if your out in the woods not lost then dont start one but this fire is used for windy days read a book take a class and youll learn the same thing
 

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Starting a fire and not catching the woods on fire is the same as using a gun and not shooting yourself with it. When utilizing inherently dangerous things you need to have a certain level of control over it to ensure it is manageable and safe. That should go without saying.

I've had fires going in the desert where everything around is dry and dead and the wind is blowing so hard the flames are sideways against the ground and embers are flying all over. But I've also sat there throwing sparks from a fero rod onto the driest tinder I could find and it just won't ignite or goes out even after catching flame. Fires don't always start or spread that easily.

You need to be able to identify the actual natural materials proximal to a fire that would likely ignite and spread. Using generalizations like "It's windy and dry" is selling yourself short and being overly cautious. If you know what you are doing you can control your fire if the area you are in is suitable.
 

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In the West, when the wind is up people do not build fires if they have any sense.
Same in the South,,,,,,you ARE responsible for any and all fires and sparks, etc.

90% of wild fires are a result of a irresponsible fires on a windy day.


If it's windy, get in shelter and heat up a MRE
 

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This isn't about your ability to control the fire. It is about the wind and the conditions of the surrounding area. If you know the area well, that is to your benefit. If you don't know the area well, you aren't likely knowledgeable enough to make that decision.

I drive two hours in any direction and my terrain changes. Wildfires are a serious problem west of where I live. I'm not about to build a fire in windy conditions regardless of my knowledge of fire-building or even if I'm carrying a fire-extinguisher in my truck, which I do.

Two hours east of here and it is lush green.

You make decisions based on varying conditions and your location. It isn't a one-size fits all "yes or no" answer.
 
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