Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
That'll be the day...
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It is time to buy some tires for my FJ Cruiser. 265/70r17

I will be purchasing some Cooper's, but have the option of standard ply or 10-ply.

For a survival vehicle... would you abandon a "nice ride" of standard ply tires.... or would you go with 10 ply tires, because they are so much tougher???


10 Plies are a no-brainer for 250/2500 to 350/3500 trucks.... They are standard.

The question is... 10 plies on a Half-ton or SUV????


.....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
790 Posts
I went with the Michelin Defenders LTX load range E, which are 10 ply rated. They ride a little stiffer than the regulars but they are tougher than nails. I run 60 psi all the way around. These things will crack a curb. They do provide a confident driving experience and are great if you tow anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I run 10 ply as well on a Chevy 2500 H D 80psi in the rear and 60 in the front it's a rough ride . I need tough tire because I live on a gravel road, haul heavy loads and pull trailers. An fj cruiser is going to be a rough ride for sure ,I wouldn't do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
If you can, get the 10 ply. We have roads here where they recommend you do not drive on them unless you have at least 10 ply tires on your vehicle. SHTF is not the time to be on the side of the road with a flat, they are well worth the extra money if you plan to be going through rough country, and I'd imagine they would hold up longer in the long run on easy roads.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SoJ_51

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,408 Posts
I went with the Michelin Defenders LTX load range E, which are 10 ply rated. They ride a little stiffer than the regulars but they are tougher than nails. I run 60 psi all the way around. These things will crack a curb. They do provide a confident driving experience and are great if you tow anything.
I have the same tire on my 2016 F150. However, thanks to the Ford tough military grade aluminum body I run 50psi all the way around. 60psi was rough especially when I was going over to LAX on a regular basis. CA60 is under perpetual construction.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SoJ_51 and Cigars

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I would go with the load range E tires if they are in the budget. Usually they aren't much more, and resale is higher. You will not be able to tell the difference in ride quality. Same with running ten more PSI difference...people swear they can tell...I think it's more of a princess mentality. Anyways, you will be running the same PSI as your current tires take, so the ride will be the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,998 Posts
If you where riding a f350 I would go 10 ply
with a fj you are way better off with a regular tire. Plus a hard ride doesn't help you off road or in the snow .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
an Suv will not carry the loads that 10 ply tires are meant to handle so it's overkill , ask the tire shop what they recommend
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
Number of plies correlates to load capacity and stiffness, but it does not dictate them. They make 10-ply ATV tires, and they’re not rated for heavy loads, just tougher to puncture. Go for the highest ply rating in your recommended load-rating for the vehicle. There are plenty of “tough-as-nails” tires in the C-rated category, and your truck won’t ride like a wagon.

E-rated tires are gonna be awful on a FJCruiser. I run D-rated ATs on my Chevy 1500 with 35psi. I’ll usually pick up a nail or two over the ~70k I get out of them, but nothing a 5-minute plug job can’t fix. Never had a “flat.” Currently running Nitto Trail Grapplers, but the Toyo AT2 or AT3 are better tires in my opinion. My favorite to date was the Firestone Destination AT, but they don’t make them anymore.

The guys running 60-80psi E-rated tires on light trucks must have the teeth rattling out of their heads.

YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,408 Posts
The guys running 60-80psi E-rated tires on light trucks must have the teeth rattling out of their heads.
That's why I went to 50. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: TENNGRIZZ

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Depends, the 10 ply will be heavier, so will use more fuel. But they will be more resistant to staking damage.

Like most things there is a trade off. And how you manage that is based on how you expect to be using them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I run what the sticker in the door says . 80/ 60. that rating is for a heavy duty truck ,yes its very rough ride when empty but with a couple thousand pounds of weight in it it's smooths right out .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,408 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,226 Posts
I drive a grand vitara and live on a county road crusher run gravel it shreds regular road tires at least one repair a week I run the cooper 10 plys (plies?)
Haven't had a flat in years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,998 Posts
I would go with the load range E tires if they are in the budget. Usually they aren't much more, and resale is higher. You will not be able to tell the difference in ride quality. Same with running ten more PSI difference...people swear they can tell...I think it's more of a princess mentality. Anyways, you will be running the same PSI as your current tires take, so the ride will be the same.
Wow I’ve been driving Ford f350s for 40 years and if I don’t let some air out of the tires
I’m bouncing so hard my eyes can’t focuse on the road .
I’m running 65 lbs front and back now .
When the temp drops to 0 the truck smooths out .less tire pressure
Larger tires allso gives a little cushion I always go up a size .
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top