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Obviously when you're hunting (especially with a weapon that requires close proximity) you're gonna wanna get close right?

so the question is: soft shoes vs boots

do you go military style boots or do you go Moccasins to feel the ground under you? and...
cross reference this with survival requirements for the same territory.

BTW I'm talking forest / bush style bow hunting.

Love to hear your Two Cents.
 

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Obviously when you're hunting (especially with a weapon that requires close proximity) you're gonna wanna get close right?

so the question is: soft shoes vs boots

do you go military style boots or do you go Moccasins to feel the ground under you? and...
cross reference this with survival requirements for the same territory.

BTW I'm talking forest / bush style bow hunting.

Love to hear your Two Cents.
G'day Bandeloop,
For me it's not what you wear on your feet as much as how you move in the shoes you wear.
Situational awareness, breathing, maintaining balance through your centre of gravity and economy of movement.
Always boots for me ( i prefer a straight laced side zip magnum). Mainly because i don't want to spike myself while running when stealth goes to "get me the hell outta here" :D:
 

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I have to throw in a vote for moccasains. A good stalker can get the job done in boots, but soft shoes and being able to feel the ground makes the job a whole lot easier.
 

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I would go for good fitting boots, water proof, if you do hit something and have to go after it and there is water, you will be uncomfortable for a while, and when hunting you are focussed on stalking and esp if you spot something, if not careful you can get hit by Snakes, or a spike through the Sole, done that Once many moons ago, didn't do any real damage, was close though, now I would only wear a good boot, just call me softy lol
m2c
 

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Most spot and stalk bowhunters wear a typical hunting boot but when it's time to close that last 100-200 yards, they take off their boots and finish the stalk in their socks. Sometimes, they'll even pack a spare pair of heavy socks to slip on over their normal socks for extra protection and to keep their normal socks a bit cleaner.
 

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I agree with Sketco.

The requirement for good footwear trumps the ability to move quietly. Therefore learn to move quietly in what you wear.

This works for me.

When you want to get real close to a critter you have to move slowly. Think 30 seconds per step. Real slow.
Big toe first, making sure theres nothing under foot thats gonna crack. Then lower the ball of the foot, then the rest of the foot by rolling down the outside. Then slowly move your weight on to it and repeat.

Some folk say you should walk in a straight line like on a tightrope, but i feel unbalanced that way and cant see the point.
 

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steger mocassins or vibram kso's. the hunting store near me carries the vibram kso's and the local hunters swear by them.
 

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I don't know the name of them, but I bought some felt-like slip-on booties that go OVER my regular boots, and they actually work pretty good. I bought them from Sportsman's Warehouse.
 

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The best stalking footwear I've found is to wear a pair of leather heavy soled moccasins with one or two pair of heavy wool socks OVER the moccasins. The socks cut noise and provide better traction than the slick soled leather, and the moccasins protect your feet from thorns and stones.
 

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Barefoot or leather mocs
Agree. And not mocs with some rubber/other sole. You need your feet to be completely flexible. Took a class and we tried our regular hiking camping/footwear vs barefoot and mocs. Night and day when it comes to 'soft' maneuvering.

It also helps to learn how to walk toes first.
 

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It depends.....

The weather.

Is it summer or winter.

soft earthy terrain? or sharp, rocky uneven terrain? or a mix?

Are you in an area where there are lots of rattlesnakes, copper heads, etc? Better have protection for that if necessary.

I am not convinced that there is a "one size fits all" answer for your question. I think that is is more of a common sense item. Take the above points, along with any pertinent details left out, and choose accordingly.

I realize that the above may be of little value to you.

The one thing of value I hope I can share is quality. If you plan to cover any great distance, you can't spend enough to get the right footware for you.

For exercise, I walk outside, I walk on a treadmill, I bicycle, and a couple of other things. I cant get my wife to exercise for love or money.

The first few times we went hiking, she kicked my butt. I had cr*ppy boots, and it really hampered our trip. Ultimately, I purchased some quality footware, and those first couple of trips are just a bad memory.
 
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