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During a long term SHTF survival situation, its going to be important for people to grow their own food. One type of seed that survivalist should stockpile are seeds for squash and zucchini.

Cooking some squash, zucchini and boudin in a cast iron skillet



Ok, why you grow squash and zucchini? They are easy to grow, bug resistant, packed full of nutrients, can be jarred for long term storage, some types can be stored for a couple of months of kept in a cool dry place, summer squash and zucchini can be eaten raw.

Its estimated that various types of squash have been cultivated by mankind for 8,000 – 10,000 years. Think about that for a minute, squash has been with mankind for thousands of years, why change now? Follow in the foot steps of those that came before you. Use available resources to achieve a desired goal. Our desired goal is to survive a long term teotwawki situation.


Eaten raw

One of the advantages of the squash family, most of them can be eaten raw. This saves you have having to fire up the stove, boil water, worry about the smoke from your fire.

In a time when the cost of fuel is at a premium, not having to build a fire to cook with, or use propane to cook with is going to save you a lot of time and energy in the long run.

A couple of reasons why you may want to cook your squash is to kill bacteria, and to make it more palatable. Some people may not like the crispy outside of the squash.

Deer resistant

Imagine this, some kind of plague has wiped out 75% of mankind, the food shipments stopped arriving at your local grocery stores, you bug out to your bug out location and plant a garden. Everything is going well, until one morning you check the garden and the plants have been eaten by deer. Your crops have been destroyed over night.

Squash and zucchini are resistant to deer. I think, and keep that in mind, this is just my opinion, the squash and zucchini plants have tiny hairs on the leaves and the stems. I am going to guess that the deer do not like the hairs on the leaves. Maybe deer just do not like the taste of squash, I dont know.

Plant your peas and beans in with the squash and zucchini. As the two plants grow together, the squash and zucchini will help keep the deer away from the tender bean and pea sprouts.

Native Americans used to plant corn, squash and beans all together in a system called “The Three Sisters”.

Nutrition

Squash and zucchini are loaded with nutrients, some examples incldue:

Riboflavin
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Potassium
Folate
Manganese

Straight neck and crook neck squash



It boils down to personal preference. Some people like straight neck, some people like crook neck squash. Personally, I like straight neck better.

The skin on crook neck squash seems a little thicker then straight neck squash. While eating squash, I prefer the thinner skin of the straight neck as opposed to the crook neck.

I do not know if straight neck and crook neck will cross pollinate. I imagine they would, but if they do, will the seeds be hybrid?

Cross pollination is something to think about if you want to save the seeds. If you plan on raising your food during a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI event, then saving the seeds should be a top priority. With saving your seeds in mind, you may not want to plant different types of squash next to each other, due to cross pollination.

Drought resistant

From my personal observations, zucchini seems to be a little more drought resistant then yellow summer squash.

A few years ago I planted some yellow squash and zucchini side by side. When there was no rain for a couple of weeks, the yellow squash wilted before the zucchini did.
 

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B]Deer resistant[/B]

Imagine this, some kind of plague has wiped out 75% of mankind, the food shipments stopped arriving at your local grocery stores, you bug out to your bug out location and plant a garden. Everything is going well, until one morning you check the garden and the plants have been eaten by deer. Your crops have been destroyed over night.

Squash and zucchini are resistant to deer. I think, and keep that in mind, this is just my opinion, the squash and zucchini plants have tiny hairs on the leaves and the stems. I am going to guess that the deer do not like the hairs on the leaves. Maybe deer just do not like the taste of squash, I dont know.
New gardeners, please keep in mind, "deer resistant" is NOT "deer proof." The most honest thing I ever saw in a list or article about what deer will or won't eat, was that deer don't read lists and articles about what deer will or won't eat.

In one respect, they're a little bit like us, when times are bad enough, some of them decide that broadening their culinary horizons is a good idea.
 

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True, Ive had years, particularly when I was a new gardener, when nothing grew well but my squash and zuchini. My first year, My garden failed. I got almost nothing from it. But around my kids "tee pee" made of branches, I planted squash and zuchini that did very well. I had planted them along with peas and beans thinking they would climb up the sides. The peas and beans gave me next to nothing, the squash didn't climb but I was eating squash and zuchini several times a week and giving them away as well. Our paster got hundreds of squash from 2 plants one year.

In my experience, the hybrids grow so much better. The seeds from the hybrid squash will grow, they just arent as productive. I probably have enough hybrid seeds to get me through the first 2 years and can worry about heirlooms later or just deal with what seeds I get from them.
 

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Average Joe
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I have a good reason why NOT to grow squash or zucchini, at least not more than one or two plants each- BECAUSE YOU GET WAY TO ****ING MANY OF THEM!!!!! Your freezers will be FULL of zucchini grated and ready for use in breads, cookies, cakes, dinners, muffins, etc etc but you will never use them because after eating nothing but "zucchini fill-in-the-blank" for months on end, you won't want zucchini again for like 3 more years. Your neighbors will very quickly get tired of you trying to give them free zucchini and yes, if you secretly drop it off in their car, on their steps, or in their garage, they WILL know it is you and they won't like you as much. Please, for the sake of your social life and freezer space and sanity, don't ****ing plant more than one or two zucchini plants. If you do... I told you so.
 

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New gardeners, please keep in mind, "deer resistant" is NOT "deer proof." The most honest thing I ever saw in a list or article about what deer will or won't eat, was that deer don't read lists and articles about what deer will or won't eat.

In one respect, they're a little bit like us, when times are bad enough, some of them decide that broadening their culinary horizons is a good idea.
One thing about deer, plant what they REALLY like a bit away from your garden, like clover, Sorghum/Milo and not only will you have deer leaving your garden alone, they will KEEP coming back for that food plot.

Which you can exploit later for meat.
 

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Many types of squash(pumpkin, zucchini and gourds are all also squash) will cross pollinate eachother and produce hybrid or sterile seed. If you want to grow several varieties, make sure to pick two or three that won't cross with one another. (As a rule of thumb, varieties in the same species will cross).

Also remember that "summer" squash are picked and eaten unripe, you will need to leave some on the vines until they become mature in order to collect viable seed.

I'm quite fond of the "winter" Butternut squash myself. Excellent flavor, lots of nutrition, hardy plant.
PrincessKraken said:
One thing about deer, plant what they REALLY like a bit away from your garden, like clover, Sorghum/Milo and not only will you have deer leaving your garden alone, they will KEEP coming back for that food plot.

Which you can exploit later for meat.
You might want to avoid that until after SHTF, baiting is illegal in a lot of places.
 

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Many types of squash(pumpkin, zucchini and gourds are all also squash) will cross pollinate eachother and produce hybrid or sterile seed. If you want to grow several varieties, make sure to pick two or three that won't cross with one another.

Also remember that "summer" squash are picked and eaten unripe, you will need to leave some on the vines until they become mature in order to collect viable seed.

I'm quite fond of the "winter" Butternut squash myself. Excellent flavor, lots of nutrition, hardy plant.

You might want to avoid that until after SHTF, baiting is illegal in a lot of places.
We're talking a long term survival garden, which is implied SHTF already.
 

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Most squash are not hybrid. So you can save seed. There are four species of squash. Look at the seed packet , they should have the scientific name on them The species is the second name. Squash of the same species will cross, different species will not. So if you choose your types of squash carefully you could grow four different species and never have to worry about them crossing.

Some squash will keep well into the winter and should be one of the types you choose so you can be eating some type of squash almost year round.

Another reason to grow them is because it is about as easy as falling off a log.
 

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Make sure to try other varieties. Just to eat, I like spaghetti squash better than pasta spaghetti. The "winter" types (think acorn and butternut squash, and any of the others with hard shells,) are good too, and keep very well in a cool root cellar, or basement. I've seen recipes for some that I haven't tried yet, but will eventually get to.
 

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gard'ner
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One thing about deer, plant what they REALLY like a bit away from your garden, like clover, Sorghum/Milo and not only will you have deer leaving your garden alone, they will KEEP coming back for that food plot.
No...
They won't leave the garden alone.

Appeasement doesn't work with deer, or dictators, or abusers... appeasement only encourages...

Planting for the deer, or feeding them grain means having more deer, and more problems in the vegetable garden.
 

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I use Cayenne pepper mixed with luke warm water in a spray bottle, on the leaves. I also pick them off every day or just look to see if any got missed. I'm also growing my garden smack in the middle of dear, moose and rabbit country lucky my yard is almost all clover as that seems to the local taste. Never has he been caught in my garden. The wild rabbits will hang outside by me and not even move. Just eating my small yard area. pretty cool really. I did however watch a squirrel eat of the frozen brussles i left out as a test for winter. they haven't made it alive but the squirrels are climbing the stocks and eating. I've found interesting. Also Zukes and yellow straight neck. oh my faves.
 

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No...
They won't leave the garden alone.

Appeasement doesn't work with deer, or dictators, or abusers... appeasement only encourages...

Planting for the deer, or feeding them grain means having more deer, and more problems in the vegetable garden.
Depends where you are.

Many people have success with it.
 

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gard'ner
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Depends where you are.

Many people have success with it.
!

You might want to read some "appeasement history".

There's a difference between appeasement and compromise.
If you can bargain in good faith with someone known to keep their agreements, that is one thing... But to offer concessions with no hope of receiving anything in return...

I used to have a garden in one of those suburbs where a neighbor fed the deer.

I used to see those deer congregate in herds of 30+!
I'd stop and count them...

Now, if I had been permitted to eat the ones that came in the garden, there wouldn't have been a problem, but the belief that those deer are cute, and shooting them horrifying, means not growing anything that isn't poisonous.

There's simply no way to keep them out of the food patch after you've been feeding them.

The people that are having success by feeding the deer... now... will find that success ultimately a failure.... unless they're thinning the herd.
 

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The people that are having success by feeding the deer... now... will find that success ultimately a failure.... unless they're thinning the herd.
First off a bit of advice, you might not want your words to be so argumentative within your first 5 posts, it really makes people wonder if you're going to be an asset to the community.

Second off, read my post. Not just the "appeasement" part, but the exploit for meat part.
 

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Squash and zucchini :mad: I had no shortage of that growing up. Fried zucchini, stuffed zucchini, mashed zucchini, baked zucchini, zucchini ala-mode, zucchini on the half shell and zucchini fricassee. It has taken most on my adult life and thousands of dollars of intensive mental therapy to overcome the horrible abuse from my childhood caused by zucchini and squash.

I will stick to growing chard and beans. :)
 

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6 Boys and 13 Hands
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Uh...
Just one problem with squash...
I'm still looking for something that eats these guyz...

They're not nearly as bad as Squash Vine Borers. They lay their eggs on the vine next to the ground and the young bore into the vine and kill the plant.




Bug and pest tolerate????????????

Bull hockey!!!!!!!!!!. I spend more time in the garden tending my squash then any other plant just to rid them of the insects that feed on them. I'll even go to say up to more time then any 6 plants combined.
 

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One worth looking into is cucuzza (also spelled cucuzzi). It's the squash that was popular in the old world before zucchini. It's technically a gourd, so it won't cross with your other curcurbits. It's amazingly prolific like zucchini, and extremely hardy. Has few pests and is more resistant to diseases and fungus than most curcurbits or gourds. When my pattypans had squash bugs and my decorative gourds had fungus issues, the cuccuzi just kept plugging along, growing squash after squash.

Picked young, they're tender and sweet and taste much better than zucchini. At least to me. I hate zucchini but can eat my weight in cucuzzi. If you let them age on the vine, they form hard shelled, snake like gourds that are over 3 feet long. You can use these gourds as bottles, make musical instruments out of them, or use them decoratively.
 
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