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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have collected quite a few Deer Park 3L plastic water bottles and was thinking of using them for food storage (rice, wheat, etc...) I have read that the plastic will let in O2 over time. Would spray painting the bottles reduce the O2 permeability? I'm thinking some kind of metallic paint. Any paint suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Dont bother with trying to improve the water bottles. Use them for storing Water!
Unless you can spray a metalized mylar lining inside of the bottle it would be a waste of time and money. Just use plastic buckets with mylar bags.

You will not go wrong.
 

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Paint is also permeable to air.

Latex more then lacquer or enamel, but they all will allow air to permeate. The latter are better as moisture barriers.
Think of paint like little circles.000000 There are gaps between them. Several layers will mean less gaps but air and moisture can find a way through them. Plastics are much the same way. Heck most paints anymore are plastic based.

The PET soda bottle are fairly good for short term storage though.

Glass and metal are the only things I've found for food packing that's got low transmission rates for air and moisture. That's why Mylar bags work so well. (layer of aluminum.)
 

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I doubt if paint will help. It's not O2 impermeable either. In fact, the solvents in it might have a negative effect on the plastic, or worse yet, permeate it and come out later inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. I was thinking about using the plastic bottles to break up the supplies into smaller units. I guess 1 gallon mylar bags (vs 5 gallon) would achieve the same result.
 

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Breaking some things into smaller units makes a lot of sense. Spices, salt, sugar, things you don't use as much of such as tomato powder, etc. But when you think about stuff like rice, beans, etc. You'll be using it plenty fast enough and it has a long enough shelf life opened, that there's really no need to break it down into smaller units. I am the only one eating out of my food storage at the moment, and a 5 gallon bucket of rice or beans gets eaten in plenty of time, even now. During a crisis, when we'll be eating 100% out of it, and there will be more people, it'll go quite fast.
 
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