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Proverbs 22:3
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lets assume that you are new to this. You have no money or gear, but want to be as prepared as possible. It would be nice to have enough money to set up a 50 acre retreat (if someone does have that much money, write me. I would be happy to set up a place for you) The first decision is: stay or go?
B.O.B. is a Bug out bag. B.O.V. is a Bug out vehicle. "Bug out" simply means pack your stuff and get out A.S.A.P. If a cop shows up at your front door and says "You have 20 min. to get out, there has been a train crash and a toxic cloud is comming this way." THAT is bug out time. Now is the time to be ready.
Walk around your house and see what you have. Bedrooms have clothes, blankets, etc. Your bathroom has most of your OTC and perscription meds, hygene stuff, toilet paper, etc. The kitchen has some food, cooking gear, knives, etc. Possibly bleach in the laundry room. Most houses have enough supplies and gear to keep going for a minimum of a few days.
If you don't have stuff packed to go, you can clear a room in a few minutes. Take a blanket off your bed or from the closet and put it on the floor.You can use sheets or pillow cases if you must, but blankets will be more usefull later. Put all the supplies you can carry in it and put it in the car. Avoid glass containers if possible, and you must decide what room gets priority. That is part of the planning. Clear out as many rooms as you have time for and load stuff in the car any way you can. There are no pionts for neatness, and you can sort stuff later. The more you can take with you, the easier life will be. Do not forget books, toys, puzzles, coloring books, stuff like that if you have kids. These will help keep you sane. It would be nice to have a tricked out humvee for a B.O.V. but you have the vehicle you drive daily. Mine is a minivan, not a monster 4x4. Keep it in as good a shape as possible, and keep the tank half full.
If you have a different kind of S.H.T.F. emergency and decide to stay home, your supply options are the same. Got beach or campping gear in the garage? Great. Read as much as possible about survival/shelter living and PRINT any article you find relevant to your situation. Can't read the computer if the power is out. Read about plumbing so you know how to use the water in your pipes in your home and how to drain the waterheater as well if it comes to that. Got gas piped into your house? Know how to shut it off? Where?
It would be nice to have $50,000 to spend on being prepared, but the 8" butcher knife in your kitchen is still a knife; and your winter jacket might not be Goretex, but it will keep you warm.
There is tons of great information on this board, and on the 'net. Do not get overwhelmed, list what you think are the emergencies you will face, and start now. You do not have to spend anything, just start thinking differently.
All comments welcome.
 

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Getting Ready
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Great Post!

Thank you for posting that. It is so easy to get overwhelmed by the volumes of talk on gear and what is best, that people can forget to be ready for the immediate needs. Thank you for taking the time post this. It is a handy reminder.
 

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Feed Yourself
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73 Posts
Meaningfull and practical advice. Easy to get fixated on procuring the higher end (or highest end) gear while other considerations fall to the wayside.
 

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Happiness is 2 at low 8
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1,403 Posts
Great points... The most important thing you have is a PLAN!!! Make the list of what's to go, what's not so important is farther down hte list. On the list include where in your home the necessary item is located. When you get the urge to BUG OUT start at the top of the list and work your way down until you run out of time OR you run out of stuff. Then go with a sense that you've executed your plan; the best you could do. Make these decisions NOW, before you're under pressure or other time constraints. Decide with your logic, not with your emotion.

Personally I have the LIST taped to the inside of my kitchen cabinet where the plates are kept. I see the LIST everyday (doon't read it, but I'm reminded that it's there.)

Don't forget to include all the paperwork that would be difficult, if not impossible, to replace; birth certificates, insurance policies, bank accounts, account numbers, passports, credit card information etc... (one month I took a page from each bill I received and made a photocopy of it, giving me account numbers, contact information, balances etc.)

Allan
 

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Destroyer of Marxism.
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875 Posts
A lot of folks get too hung up on gear. Especially RAMBO gear. Do you need a gun, ABSOLUTELY!! A good .45 and a (concealable) carbine is a great start. How much ammo can you carry? Not much, when you are carrying all sorts of other stuff. You'll either need to stay put, or have a place well stocked that you could get to on foot or even bicycle if need be, for the roads may be impassible. If you do plan to hoof it for any distance, (you might not even plan it, you might end up doing it anyway) try getting your stuff and actually hiking w/ it. You'll find yourself carrying a lot less probably.
 

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Keep a camper stocked and ready to go

I keep my camper stocked up and ready to go at a moment's notice. If I am ordered to evacuate, I can be road ready in 20 minutes. All I would need to grab from the house would be meds and guns.
 

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Good post...yeah you don't need a ton of money to get started. Aside from the other good suggestions, I strongly recommend buying a compass and hitting the woods. Learn land navigation, get out of your comfort zone. Spend a few nights out in the woods w/ just the basics.
 

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Destroyer of Marxism.
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875 Posts
Good post...yeah you don't need a ton of money to get started. Aside from the other good suggestions, I strongly recommend buying a compass and hitting the woods. Learn land navigation, get out of your comfort zone. Spend a few nights out in the woods w/ just the basics.
I love your icon.

However, I disagree with the "hit the woods" idea. Too many people have delusions about hauling a$$ into the wilderness with 150 pounds of gear, 2000 rounds of ammo, 2 pistols, an AK, a shotgun, and a bolt action rifle. These folks will ditch most of their gear before getting out of the danger zone. Besides, what will you live on? You can shoot critters, and catch fish, but you need other foods for nutrition. You need starches, salts, vitamins etc. Unless you are a VERY experienced outdoorsman, you'll either die, or you'll find yourself right back in the "civilized" world. "Survivorman" knows a lot about surviving, but notice how he always works his way OUT of the woods.
 

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Great post! The best way to be prepared to bug out or bug in, is to do it. Try to fix a meal without Gas or Electric, make a meal using whole beans or bake a loaf of bead. This thanksgiving we lost power at 1:00 p.m. you should have seen every ones faces (no mashed potatoes, no gravy) I was smoking the turkey so we had meat, but we were suddenly all quite aware of our dependence on utilities. Want to be ready to bug out with out have a camper all packed (that awesome if you have it!) but if not, get up one Saturday, grab the family and say we’re leaving in 20 minutes and see how it goes. The best thing to do is practice.
 

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To secure peace is to...
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Great post. If anyone actually even reads this board, I'm guessing they are more "prepared" than 98% of the population. It's not about doing a ton, it's just about doing.
 

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To secure peace is to...
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4,194 Posts
I love your icon.

However, I disagree with the "hit the woods" idea. Too many people have delusions about hauling a$$ into the wilderness with 150 pounds of gear, 2000 rounds of ammo, 2 pistols, an AK, a shotgun, and a bolt action rifle. These folks will ditch most of their gear before getting out of the danger zone. Besides, what will you live on? You can shoot critters, and catch fish, but you need other foods for nutrition. You need starches, salts, vitamins etc. Unless you are a VERY experienced outdoorsman, you'll either die, or you'll find yourself right back in the "civilized" world. "Survivorman" knows a lot about surviving, but notice how he always works his way OUT of the woods.
Great points! I backpack, I hunt, I fish. That being said, I'm not leaving my house unless I absolutely have to. My house provides a lot of protection from bad weather and idiots. Besides, my backpack isn't near as big as my house and isn't as easy to carry!
 

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very good post everyone don't have the luxery of buying the latest and greatest items
if your like me i live paycheck to paycheck i do stretch myself thin and buy some extra food and walmart gear may not be the best but it's a start i love summer garage sales.
flea markets, surplus stores.i know when i lived in arkansas the radio station had a show
called the trading post where callers call in to sell anything from furniture,tools,chickens,
houses,land you name it they sold it.but if you are a camper,hiker hunter you probaly have a good start on things to help you survive.
 

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Great post. Getting back to the basics is a must. You have to be ready to make it with out Super Walmart and you local grocery store for........ how ever long. I am lacking because I depend on the internet for all my info. I have not printed anything out yet. Making a binder with how-to's is a great idea.
 

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Grumpy old man
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145 Posts
If you want to find flaws in your planning, do a drill. Our kids are grown and out of the house, but we used to do drills. Mostly ours were for weather related emergencies. Its as simple as this, my wife or I would call a drill and the main breaker would be turned off killing power to the house. The scenario would then be given, ie. road is impassable, all store within x miles are out of goods, etc. We started out during daylight hours and had 1 or maybe 2 meals done on the woodstove,(or barbecue in the summer). Don't start out with impossibly difficult scenarios. Our kids actually enjoyed them. It brings back some good,(and some trying) memories.
Regards,
vorpal
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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I love your icon.

However, I disagree with the "hit the woods" idea. Too many people have delusions about hauling a$$ into the wilderness with 150 pounds of gear, 2000 rounds of ammo, 2 pistols, an AK, a shotgun, and a bolt action rifle. These folks will ditch most of their gear before getting out of the danger zone. Besides, what will you live on? You can shoot critters, and catch fish, but you need other foods for nutrition. You need starches, salts, vitamins etc. Unless you are a VERY experienced outdoorsman, you'll either die, or you'll find yourself right back in the "civilized" world. "Survivorman" knows a lot about surviving, but notice how he always works his way OUT of the woods.
Reply]
Buy "Botany in a day", "The Essential Wild Foods survival guide" and several good field guides. I recommend a Poisonous plant field guide as well, so you learn what NOT to eat.

North America has 4000 edible plants. You can learn the major ones in a few weeks of study, especially in "The Botany in a day", because it teaches how to recognize the entire plant family (plants in the same family generally have similar uses)

If you master this skill, you will never go hungry.
 

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Mountain Critter
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914 Posts
However, I disagree with the "hit the woods" idea....You can shoot critters, and catch fish, but you need other foods for nutrition. You need starches, salts, vitamins etc. Unless you are a VERY experienced outdoorsman, you'll either die, or you'll find yourself right back in the "civilized" world. "Survivorman" knows a lot about surviving, but notice how he always works his way OUT of the woods.
I do agree with you that it would be a foolish plan indeed to run off to the woods and attempt to survive for the long term if you had little experience, as I hear some say they plan to do. Not a good idea.

But I must mention that you actually can obtain all the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients you need from a combination of meat and edible plants. Or, if necessary, from animals alone, if you use all the parts--brains, eyeballs, bone marrow, boil the bones for broth, etc.

The biggest concern over the long run in this type of situation could well turn out to be fat, which is lacking on some of the smaller game like rabbits, but porcupines, fish, deer, bears, etc. are all sources of this.
 

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AAAH GET TO ZE CHOPPA!
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This post seems much more realistic for the average Joes (like me.) I think that organizing what you already have is much more useful in the short-term than haphazardly buying gear.

I currently live in suburban central Virginia, so the only bad events I have witnessed are snow or hurricane related. There are a ton of apartments in our immediate area though, so the local Walmart and food stores are swamped on a normal day... I'm not keen on competing with everyone for supplies at the last minute if supplies or utilities are cut.

Currently I think I can handle myself well bugging in, but I don't see myself subsistence hunting in the woods anytime soon. I'm going to focus on preparing for 1-2 week events first while padding the bank account.
 

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Adaptable.
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great post. This summer we had wildfires about 2 miles away. For us, prepping to bug out was not grabbing out bug out bags and bailing, it was loading our camper with expensive stuff we would be hard pressed to replace, and getting our trucks facing the right way to hitch and go. Nothing we had was any more survival oriented than usuall, except that we bought really good resperators after realizing what it was like to breath smoldering poison oak.

I think people get too caught up in the end of days scenarios, and forget the reality that it will be smaller events to test our metal.
 

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This is an awesome topic. We only have one kid left at home so between the three of us we've discussed this issue of what would we take, how would execute the evacuation etc. The 3 of us would be fine. My concern is for my other kids (who live nearby) and getting grandkids from various places such as school and day care. I'm probably being unrealistic about keeping/having the whole family together during such an event.

Does anyone have any ideas on how to co-ordinate such a thing? Or if you've made plans what are they? I'm open for any suggestions or comments.
 

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Proverbs 22:3
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This is an awesome topic. We only have one kid left at home so between the three of us we've discussed this issue of what would we take, how would execute the evacuation etc. The 3 of us would be fine. My concern is for my other kids (who live nearby) and getting grandkids from various places such as school and day care. I'm probably being unrealistic about keeping/having the whole family together during such an event.

Does anyone have any ideas on how to co-ordinate such a thing? Or if you've made plans what are they? I'm open for any suggestions or comments.
A couple of thoughts. Sit the whole family down and discuss different emergencies you want to be ready for. I will assume you have several cars available in your group, and cell phones everywhere. Decide who will be primarially responsible for which kid and who will be the back-up person for each kid. Assign whoever is the closest driver for pick-up of the kids (also, if someone is retired they could go faster than leaving work.)
Have a plan for a primary contact person that 1 person in every family (group) calls to coordinate where to go, and to decide if you all are going to "Bug OUT" or "Bug IN".
Have a preset plan for if everyone is "Bugging OUT" where to meet if you can not get through on the phone. Designate a SMALL store, or someplace very distinctive just outside of town off and away from the interstate. Have some colored paper stored in the cars along with a magic marker so you can leave eachother messages at the meeting site. If you have family or friends you trust out of town or even out of state, designate 2 or 3 checkpoints along the route to meet up or leave messages. Also plan 2 or 3 different routes. Keep open as many options as possible without being too confusing.
If you all decide to "Bug IN", plan now to go to whoever has the best equiped house for you all to ride out the storm in. Put ego aside and be realistic. If possible, store basic esentials for each person in the "Bug House" as well as the items each one will bring from home.
Coordination is the same as every aspect of survival/preparedness, plan now and be sure everyone knows who to call and what to do. Even the littlest kids need to know who is going to pick them up and where they are going.
GOD Bless
 
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