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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As we all know just about all types of ammo is sold out. For the first time in my life I can not find 30-30 Winchester, or even 270 Winchester.

You want to know what I can find? 280 Remington / 7mm Express.

In the mid-1990s I asked for and received as a Christmas present a Remington model 700 mountain rifle chambered in 280 Remington. In the 1990s and into the mid-2000s 280 Remington ammo cost were comparable to 270 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield. Over the past decade or so 280 Ammo went from around $18 a box to close to $30 a box for Remington core-lokt.

The writing was on the wall, either buy another deer rifle or spend a fortune on 280 Remington ammunition, so I opted for a 308 Winchester and a Marlin 336 chambered in 30-30 Winchester. This gave me three deer rifles in proven calibers.

Since deer season is just a few months away I decided to get online and look for some ammo.

Let's make it clear that I do not "have" to buy deer hunting ammunition as there is plenty in my stockpile. Since buying the Marlin 336 in 30-30 and a DS Arms FN/FAL in 308 Winchester I stockpiled a few several rounds.

Guess what, just about everything is sold out in all three of my deer hunting calibers except 280 Remington. The oddball caliber I phased out of the rotation is now the only caliber I can find in stock.

When I decided to get another couple of of deer hunting rifles - not that the FN/FAL was designe4d for deer hunting - I picked a couple of calibers that were usually always in stock, and those were the 30-30 Winchester and the 308 Winchester.

Fast forward to the Coronavirus pandemic, and wide spread civil unrest from communist, socialist and fascist hijacking the black lives matter movement, and the common calibers that were usually in stock are now sold out.

So sometimes it pays to have an oddball deer rifle sitting in the corner.
 

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It only pays if you haven't stockpiled it already.

The only reason to go for an oddball caliber is if you are already behind the curve, if all the normal ammunition is already gone and you are buying a new gun and need ammo for it right then.

If your a prepper its a liability if your trying to stock a thousand rounds, or ten thousand rounds, of a caliber that normally is only stocked a few boxes at a time.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I like stuff that has common brass and bullet diameters. Reloading for most stuff is nearly the same cost, a 30-06 takes a little more powder than a 308 for example, which is a little more than a 30-30. Really good bullets can cost a lot more than standard stuff. Most times proper reloads will shoot better than factory stuff.

Then there are chamber adapters and such. There was chamber bushing that would allow a 308 to be shot in a 30-06. It could be pulled with a tight patch and allow the rifle to go back to 30-06.
 

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BS!!!

As long as trucks are still moving and planes are still flying, ammo for common calibers is still available online. It might cost more than you want to pay but it's still there.


https://ammoseek.com/ammo/308-winchester

https://ammoseek.com/ammo/30-30-winchester

Even during the worst runs on ammo in the past I was able to find common calibers when it was sold out at Walmart and the LGS. That include 22LR, 9mm, 308, 223, etc.

If not ammoseek - all those common calibers are available on Gunbroker.
 

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I cast projectiles and reload. Many of my rifle/pistols have never fired a factory round. I have few cast 6.5 projectiles and several boxes of jacketed projectiles. they will load 6.5 arisaka, 6.5X57 and 6.5 X 55. I don't worry too much about finding ammo for the hornet, 25-20 or 32-20. If you are properly prepared, ammo availability is a non-issue. Watch sales pick up primers and powder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BS!!!

As long as trucks are still moving and planes are still flying, ammo for common calibers is still available online. It might cost more than you want to pay but it's still there.

If not ammoseek - all those common calibers are available on Gunbroker.
It is hit and miss. Links you posted led to in stock stuff. Not what I typically shoot, such as Wolf in my FN/FAL.


It only pays if you haven't stockpiled it already.

The only reason to go for an oddball caliber is if you are already behind the curve, if all the normal ammunition is already gone and you are buying a new gun and need ammo for it right then.
I disagree. Over the past 25 years my 280 Remington has harvested plenty of deer, and I have plenty of ammo for it.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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My oldest red headed step child

My first hunting rifle was my grandfathers 25-35 octagon barrel, when I was 10 some some 40 plus years ago. Why Winchester thought that round needed such a heavy barrel I cant guess. I havnt shot it in decades, have kept it clean and lubed, lots of stories and memories resurge when handling it. I still have a couple of boxes that are decades old LOL. I went into my local sporting goods store last weekish and they had 4 boxes on the shelf. I didnt get them as at $1.50 a round I wasnt going to take it out on a date. I was just window shopping for other available ammo.

It is just one of several that will live in the back of the safe as memories past being preserved. But each of them still have a few bites available just incase.

I prefer milspec ammo, and have several caliber options with several tools for each that will take them, with several 50cal boxes of each stored and stacked.

My weakest link is 300 blackout that I just started experimenting with about a year ago only 2 uppers and 2500ish rounds depending on my range activity.
 

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Right now in my area, just get a .243 or a .270. That ammo has been on the shelf every time I have stopped in Academy to do a looksee lately. I stupidly passed up a good deal on a .270 a while back "that I didn't need."

My buddy says I run a home for ugly odd guns. so I have some non typical calibers. Those to me are just my fun guns or were so cheap that I couldn't pass it up. I keep guns of standard calibers as my working guns. .308, 30-30, 30.06, 5.56, .22l/s/lr, 7.62x54R (so common it is not oddball), and 7.62x39 all haunt my safe. I believe there is not one gun for every situation, so variety is good. My ammo cache is a bit deeper for certain calibers, but I have enough of all to make a go at it.
 

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I bought my first handgun that was reloadable back about 1982. A S&W model 19. I bought one box of wadcutter ammo and a box of Remington 357 loads. Then I bought a Rockchucker press and dies and I was in the reloading game. My first deer rifle was a custom 7x57 built on a Mauser action. Ammo was impossible to find so I bought dies and reloaded for it too.

Like goat daddy most of my guns have never had a factory round fired through them. I am well stocked and shortages have no affect on me. I recommend reloading to anyone who will listen. Most don't. They always assume ammo will be there when they need it.

And yes oddball rounds can sometimes be a life saver when it comes to ammo. It always cracks me up when shooters say if the world has gone completely nuts they will just go to a military base or a police station and the cops or army guys will share ammo with them. I bet they are in for a big surprise. I can't imagine the cops ever sharing ammo with anyone they think they might have to fight some day.:eek:
 

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As we all know just about all types of ammo is sold out. For the first time in my life I can not find 30-30 Winchester, or even 270 Winchester.

You want to know what I can find? 280 Remington / 7mm Express.

In the mid-1990s I asked for and received as a Christmas present a Remington model 700 mountain rifle chambered in 280 Remington. In the 1990s and into the mid-2000s 280 Remington ammo cost were comparable to 270 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield. Over the past decade or so 280 Ammo went from around $18 a box to close to $30 a box for Remington core-lokt.

The writing was on the wall, either buy another deer rifle or spend a fortune on 280 Remington ammunition, so I opted for a 308 Winchester and a Marlin 336 chambered in 30-30 Winchester. This gave me three deer rifles in proven calibers.

Since deer season is just a few months away I decided to get online and look for some ammo.

Let's make it clear that I do not "have" to buy deer hunting ammunition as there is plenty in my stockpile. Since buying the Marlin 336 in 30-30 and a DS Arms FN/FAL in 308 Winchester I stockpiled a few several rounds.

Guess what, just about everything is sold out in all three of my deer hunting calibers except 280 Remington. The oddball caliber I phased out of the rotation is now the only caliber I can find in stock.

When I decided to get another couple of of deer hunting rifles - not that the FN/FAL was designe4d for deer hunting - I picked a couple of calibers that were usually always in stock, and those were the 30-30 Winchester and the 308 Winchester.

Fast forward to the Coronavirus pandemic, and wide spread civil unrest from communist, socialist and fascist hijacking the black lives matter movement, and the common calibers that were usually in stock are now sold out.

So sometimes it pays to have an oddball deer rifle sitting in the corner.
I'm always amazed at posts about lack of ammo, in this case .30-.30. This caliber shoots .308" projectiles, uses large rifle primers and very little powder. Reloading solves ammo availability issues and 3 of 4 components (except brass) can be used in other .30 caliber cartridges. Ammo shortages have simply never been an issue in my 40 years of reloading.
 

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BS!!!

As long as trucks are still moving and planes are still flying, ammo for common calibers is still available online. It might cost more than you want to pay but it's still there.


https://ammoseek.com/ammo/308-winchester

https://ammoseek.com/ammo/30-30-winchester

Even during the worst runs on ammo in the past I was able to find common calibers when it was sold out at Walmart and the LGS. That include 22LR, 9mm, 308, 223, etc.

If not ammoseek - all those common calibers are available on Gunbroker.
Centerfire reloads cost no more now than they did 6 months ago....and mine are available.
 

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I cast projectiles and reload. Many of my rifle/pistols have never fired a factory round. I have few cast 6.5 projectiles and several boxes of jacketed projectiles. they will load 6.5 arisaka, 6.5X57 and 6.5 X 55. I don't worry too much about finding ammo for the hornet, 25-20 or 32-20. If you are properly prepared, ammo availability is a non-issue. Watch sales pick up primers and powder.
Exactly. I never cease to be amazed at the ammo shortage posts. It requires 6-10 minutes to crank out 50 rounds of 9mm on one of my Dillon presses.
 

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Reloading solves ammo availability issues
How? Ammo components are made by the same people who make the ammo...and run out at the same time. I can't see how reloading helps this issue in the slightest. It requires the exact same materials either way. Literally the only difference is who is assembling them.

Its like a guy saying "I don't have to worry about food shortages because I know how to cook"

Exactly. I never cease to be amazed at the ammo shortage posts. It requires 6-10 minutes to crank out 50 rounds of 9mm on one of my Dillon presses.
If you have primers, bullets, brass and powder. If you have primers bullets brass and powder......you have ammunition. Wether its already assembled or not does not effect the availability.
 

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How? Ammo components are made by the same people who make the ammo...and run out at the same time. I can't see how reloading helps this issue in the slightest. It requires the exact same materials either way. Literally the only difference is who is assembling them.

Its like a guy saying "I don't have to worry about food shortages because I know how to cook"



If you have primers, bullets, brass and powder. If you have primers bullets brass and powder......you have ammunition. Wether its already assembled or not does not effect the availability.
As I stated...I've been reloading for 40 years. I have no shortage of primers...powder...projectiles useable across many calibers. If one shoots one caliber more than the others...load more ammo for that caliber. I'm not required to sweat over lack of commercial availability....like non-reloaders. I can only assume you limit yourself to commercial ammo....I may be wrong since I don't know you.
 

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As I stated...I've been reloading for 40 years. I have no shortage of primers...powder...projectiles useable across many calibers. If one shoots one caliber more than the others...load more ammo for that caliber. I'm not required to sweat over lack of commercial availability....like non-reloaders. I can only assume you limit yourself to commercial ammo....I may be wrong since I don't know you.
Stockpiling is still stockpiling
 

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Stockpiling is still stockpiling
It is. And I shoot many calibers...reload for all except my .25 acp. Primers are useable across many calibers...been stockpiling for decades. Powder...stockpiled. 1 pound of typical handgun powder can create more that 1k loaded rounds...various calibers. Shooters World (Lovex) powders are $19.00 lb...even now. Projectiles...stockpiled...many useable across several cartridges. Brass...specific to caliber. However...most non-reloaders throw away reloadable once fired brass. I just ordered 2k 9mm brass this evening because the price was reasonable....even now. I have multiple 9mm pistols and an PCC. Gave my kids 9mm's. They don't worry about ammo. I keep a few thousand rounds of commercial ammo on hand too, purchased when prices were low...why not? All reloadable brass. I keep a decent but not huge stockpile of ammo loaded in calibers I shoot most. I turn out any handgun cartridge reloads at the rate of one 50 rnd box in 6-10 minutes. Bottle necked rifle...20 minutes to load 50 rnds using Dillon carbide sizer dies.

If someone broke into the house and stole ammo, odds are they wouldn't steal reloading components. They wouldn't know what to do with the components...like many here. It has always made sense to me to learn skills...reloading is a valuable skill. Guys at work...like folks on this forum worry about having ammo.
 

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...been stockpiling for decades.

Guys at work...like folks on this forum worry about having ammo.
I have.... 7 presses from a Rockchucker and Lee hand press to my 550B. (One just for my Barrett)
Well over half a ton of lead, and like you I've been piling up components for.... Close enough to 20 years to say "me too"

I know I have over 50,000 small pistol primers, less of others, but... Adequate.
I also got in the habit of buying loaded ammo by the pallet.

My point being for those who have not been doing This For longer than it takes for a newborn to get to college...

It's still many years of piling up resources. Doesn't matter if they are assembled or unasembled.
If you ain't got it, you ain't got it.
 

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My daily carry is a m&p compact in .357 sig the ammo is always available, even during the Obama years and Columbine shortages that's why I carry the caliber
My hunting rifle is a 308 and 99% of the time I can find a box or two on the store shelves

I do reload all of my calibers and every now and then the components are hard to find or are too expensive to buy but that's why we stock pile
 
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