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Founder
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone tell me what this disease is. My beans were the first plants to be infected. The brown spots appear, grows and then the leaf dies.

Can anyone ID the cause of the brown spots and a solution? It looks like I will lose some of my plants if I do not find an answer.

These pictures are of a snap bean plant






Notice in this picture the brown spots are in a line around the edge of the leaf.



These pictures are of a grape tomato plant






These pictures are of cucumber sprouts



 

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Hunter/Farmer
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Here's what I think it is:
On the beans,.....looks like light frost damage. Nothing to worry about. They look heathy enough to grow and produce.

On the tomatoes and cukes, looks like minor sand splash. Only affects the lower leaves and the cotyledons. They look heathy enough to survive also.


My beans have been taking a beating from the winds. They look beat up, but once the days warm a little more they should take off also.
 

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Permanently gone
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Here's My Best Guess

Most often when one or more plant or veggie has the same characteristics as another in a leaf disease, it's cause by a blight ( infection) that is actually a fungus. The leaves in the photos appears to be just that. Although, just is a four letter word, the results can be a garden of diseased plants. But..there is action that can be taken.

Leaf blight first appears as indefinite brown to black areas with pale yellow centers. Infected leaves shrivel when infection is heavy.I see this in some of the pictures. Under these conditions foliage appears as if burned by fire. The fungus overwinters in infected crop refuse.If you had a compost heap, did you do a *hot* compost? Hot compost generally destroys fungus, but if you did the lower-temp one you had to *turn* at intervals, the fungus can survive. Air-borne spores of the fungus are produced in large numbers on old lesions during periods of high humidity. Spores may also be carried on seed. The fungus requires moisture for infection. A preventative fungicide program should be followed where the disease is a threat.

What fungicide you use is dependent on what's "infected". Because of the folds and burning look on the edges of the leaves I'm going to say that my thought is that it is not "spot" fungus even though that's treated the same.

Unfortunately, fungicide will probably have to be used. The best manageable means is to spray every 10-14 days. Because every state differs in what homeowners vs farmers can acquire for fungicide your best bet is a garden center. Not A Home Depot, not a Lowes but a garden center. Bring a leaf from each plant and explain, or print off what I've said here. Ask what they recommend, for area, as a fungicide control. Your best advice will be from that type of avenue. If that directs you to a Home Depot to purchase what's needed,fine. It's possible the Garden Center can supply you with what's needed.

The pictures are fabulous and I am not leaning in the direction of "frost damage" Fungal infection isn't uncommon and in moist or humid areas is more apt to be a problem. It does have to be put under control.

Spray interval should be every 10 to 14 days depending on fungicide used.
 

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Premium Member
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It does look an awful lot like a fungal infection. A few quick treatments should knock it out quickly. You might want to check with a local weed and feed and see if there are common strains in your area, and what they carry specifically for those strains. In my area a general combo works superior to all others as our conditions vary so widely. The one I use is from W-mart but available online is Schultz Garden Safe. It will knock out bugs, fungus, and mites. Just be careful to apply it in the real early morning or real late evening so as to minimize the impact on "good" bugs.
 

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Elitist Gun Snob
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Short of fungus, it could be a nitrogen or potassium deficiency. The only reason I mention that is, I am somewhat of an Aquarium nerd, and in aquarium plants, which I KNOW are different, when signs like that pop up, it can sometimes be caused by nutrient deficiencies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The peas were planted in a spot I have never gardened before. So disease from lack of crop rotation is out of the question. The peas were the first ones to show the infection. I wonder if it was on the seed? But the seed had been in the freezer for a couple of weeks before planting.

Nor was any compost used. Horse manure was used, but the spots showed up before the manure was added to the soil.

I took a small solution of bleach water and sprayed some plants down. Going to wait 24 hours, then spray down the rest of the plants - if the first ones show no damage. The next step is to use an anti-bacterial soap and water solution this weekend.

I would rather not use a true fungicide solution.

The good thing, the potatoes do no seem to be affected, yet.
 

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Adaptable.
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Kev, Get a soil test kit. A few of those look like nitrogen burn. When there is too much N in the soil, their metabolisms get thrown into overdrive, and burn the edges of the leaves. Get a cheap soil test kit and figure out whats in your soil first. I'm by no means a master gardener, but I have encountered nitrogen burn on incorrectly replanted house plants. And it looked a tad similar to the edge leaf. It may well be a blight tho, but odd it would srtike Hemlocks, (tomatos) legumes and cucumbers. Aren't most blights at least slightly species specific?

-g
 

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Old Toot
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Kev
Sacarifice a plant and take it by the Extension office and ask the County Agent. Most are pretty knowledgable. Sure helps to have the plant in front of you for diagnosis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I called the local feed store, they said it might be a fungus.

The lady there told me to stop extra watering and spray the plants down with a soap and water solution.

So I am going to stop watering the plants, and give them a spray with anti-bacterial soap and water this evening. We have a 60% chance of rain friday, so I will not water the garden again until the middle or end of next week.
 
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