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I deal in lead
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Discussion Starter #1
So for solar u need panels batterys and inverter,correct?? Curious about the inverter if someone could explain. Also where can I get em? Tryin to get a rig for my fridge
 

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Back of beyond!
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So for solar u need panels batterys and inverter,correct?? Curious about the inverter if someone could explain. Also where can I get em? Tryin to get a rig for my fridge
You need; the solar panels, load controller, batteries, power inverter, in that order, basically. The load controller ensures that the correct amount of voltage is getting to your batteries. Also, a voltmeter of some sort is recommended.
The power inverter ensures that you're getting AC power to your electric system in your house.
 

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You can find inverters pretty quickly on Amazon, but you'll need to make sure that it is rated high enough to handle the appliance you're wanting to power. Since all inverters have a power rating, you'll just need to check the appliance and buy the appropriate inverter.

The basics are in desert_wanderer's post.

The solar panels collect energy.
The batteries store the energy.
The charge controller prevents the batteries from over charging, and make sure they get enough of a charge.

The inverter allows you to use standard household appliances running on 120VAC (the inverters allow you to convert DC stored in the batteries to AC, and allow the voltage conversion from 12V to 120VAC. If you are running direct DC appliances, you might be able to get away without this, but it depends on the voltage of the appliance, and how your batteries are wired. Battery banks can be wired for 6V, 12V, 24V, 36V, 48V, etc., but most are set up in a 12V fashion with an inverter (most of which run on 12V).
 

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Back of beyond!
Joined
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2,575 Posts
You can find inverters pretty quickly on Amazon, but you'll need to make sure that it is rated high enough to handle the appliance you're wanting to power. Since all inverters have a power rating, you'll just need to check the appliance and buy the appropriate inverter.

The basics are in desert_wanderer's post.

The solar panels collect energy.
The batteries store the energy.
The charge controller prevents the batteries from over charging, and make sure they get enough of a charge.

The inverter allows you to use standard household appliances running on 120VAC (the inverters allow you to convert DC stored in the batteries to AC, and allow the voltage conversion from 12V to 120VAC. If you are running direct DC appliances, you might be able to get away without this, but it depends on the voltage of the appliance, and how your batteries are wired. Battery banks can be wired for 6V, 12V, 24V, 36V, 48V, etc., but most are set up in a 12V fashion with an inverter (most of which run on 12V).
You said it way better than I did! Great job!
 

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I deal in lead
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Discussion Starter #5
Is there an "all in one"kit for lets say for 500 watts?? or should this be something a should build...only looking to power fridge and maybe lites. 12volts will work for this operation?? Is that the "norm"?
 

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Hey, sorry for the delay.

When you're getting into the 500W range, the only way to get all-in-one would likely be by going through a local contractor.

The reality is, in order to operate a 500W device 24/7, you'll need to have more than a 500W solar array. A couple of issues:

1. It's not sunny all day and all night. At night, you're not collecting anything.
2. You won't get peak solar production every day, unless you lived in Arizona or something (and even then there are rainy days).

What you need to do is figure out your average sun production, multiplied by the number of hours per day you have of sun.

In reality, to run a 500W appliance 24/7 at full load you'd probably need close to a 1000W solar system and still have a generator for rainy days or if the batteries get too low. (I did a brief calculation using http://www.findsolar.com/index.php?page=rightforme and came up with 1.36kW system for Aspen since you listed Colorado as your location). This sizes it out to be 12KW/day average production.

But even with that, most appliances (refrigerator included) don't run all the time. They only run when they are kicking on the cooling pump, so you may get by with a bit less than that.
 
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