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What is a survivalist?

Is it someone who can survive a hurricane because of an underground shelter or the person who knows how to live off the land and is ready to run to the woods in case of an invasion? What type or group of eventualities must one plan for to be considered a survivalist? Must one even plan or can ones raw personality make them a survivalist?

Is being a survivalist defined by how long you can live through some type of event? Does it need to be 3 days, a week, month year or more? What about just surviving another day? Does it matter if that day is just another one at the office or do you need to have the enemy in hot pursuit? What about just getting through the day as you watch a loved one slowly die and try to comfort all those around who are also suffering?

What is a survivalist?


I think everyone is a survivalist to some degree and that our level of survivalism is not measured on a single spectrum but rather a whole group of spectrums. I have always been a survivalist, my position on the set of spectrums that measure the degree of my survivalism is ever evolving and will be until the day I die. I think this is true for anyone who hasn't given up, stopped and said "this is where I die and I don't care anymore.".

-Per.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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good question. I think my answer is closer to Strong's, but I am just one of the ones that not only see the candy coated shell of the world coming down- I know what I have to do about it.
 

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Knocked Down But Up Again
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The day my father began threatening to leave my mother with no support and five small children is the day I began being a survivalist. He never actually did it, but threatened many times, and I guess it did something to me.

From then on, I decided to be the master of my own fate. No matter what happened, my feet would still be tappin' and no one would ever have such total power over me that I would be devastated and destitute if they withdrew their support.

Whew, I feel like I owe my therapist some money. LOL!
 

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My parents grew up at the end of the depression and during WWII, I still have their ration books. We always had plenty of food, could hunker down for months if needed, so I guess it was just a way of life.

Now I have my own family and everyone has been living high on the hog. My wife is not into the same mindset as me so it gets hard from time to time as to why we should buy bulk and keep all this stuff.

It's not just a natural event, terrorist attack, war, I want to be ready for any event, what happens when someone losses a job. If you have the food and water covered for 6 months or longer you can then focus on other issues at hand.
 

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Aquaholic
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The day I went into downtown Charleston SC with my team to attempt to restore order after Hugo hit.

Shortly after we entered Charleston City the National Guard came by and asked that we unload our shotguns and turn the ammunition over to them. So we did. After they were out of sight, we reloaded from our patrol vehicles.
But all of us realized the implications of that incident.

We were there under authority of the Governor, the NG was not able to "disarm" us....but instead to make us unable to resist should we need to. We were allowed to keep our sidearms and ammunition for sidearms, but no "long gun ammunition".
 

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Antique Nurse
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I don't remember NOT being a survivalist. My grandfather was Amish but was shunned around 1900 or so. My dad - #8 of 13 children - knew how to survive, they had a farm. I can remember him carrying me through the woods to take me hunting and to find plants to eat; telling me how to make teas and so forth. We always had food stockpiled, always had guns in the house (NOT locked up!) and we were always ready in emergencies.
 

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OK I a reaching waaaay back. Macgyver and scouts. He is the reason I bought my first Swiss Army knife. I loved the way he could get out of anything with a good mind and a few items. (I am actually working on a youtube video intro using Macgyver theme music for it. LOL) Scouts - be prepared. Need I say more?
 

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Good Bye
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I have been taught to be a woodsman since I was a kid, but after I got back from Iraq, and started a family is when I became seriously about survival.
 

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I always seemed to have the survivalist instinct since I was a kid. I always had my fort full of supplies I might need "if the Russians attacked". I loved camping in forts I built in the woods. I wanted to be just like Grizzly Adams. The Y2k thing got me into the next level. I stared building my food and water preps, bought a shotgun, and added alot more to my camping gear. My preparedness just keeps growing more and more each year. I just hope I've done enough when the time comes.
 

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Team Lauren 2010
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Back in 1992 (I think) they "predicted" an earthquake would hit the New Madrid Fault so everyone started to get prepared. I've pretty much kept up on it since then. Last summer we got hit with 2 of the worst storms ever in 3 days. Over 2 million customers lost power. I was one of the few ready for it. I do have to say I did add some things to my kits since then. I had just put a new emergency kit under my desk at work and it got action almost right away.
 

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Riverratand I must be seperated twins. I always had forts piled high waiting for the russians. We drank those juice barrels as kids {Looked like a little barrel filled with kool aid} when they were empty we filled them with wood ash or dirt. When you threw them they blew dust all over on impact!:rolleyes:

My parents were always preppers. Watching Red Dawn as a kid sealed my fate.
 

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Riverratand I must be seperated twins. I always had forts piled high waiting for the russians. We drank those juice barrels as kids {Looked like a little barrel filled with kool aid} when they were empty we filled them with wood ash or dirt. When you threw them they blew dust all over on impact!:rolleyes:

My parents were always preppers. Watching Red Dawn as a kid sealed my fate.

I think you might be right about the twins thing. My bombs of choice were dried mud balls with little rocks in the middle. I had a fishing pole, a couple of thermoses of water, C-rations from my aunt in the national gaurd, and kept them in my permanent fort close to our house. The first time I saw Red Dawn...words can't describe it. It's still my favorite movie. One of the reasons I bought my last truck was because it reminded me of Jed's truck in the movie, a blue '78 Chevy.
 

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Dang near at birth. Was raised on a farm, Butchered our own beef, smoked our own ham, gathered our own eggs, canned our vegetables and fruits. Hunting and fishing was just a way to stock the freezer to keep from starving in the winter. Made our own clothes, Always had the oil lamps in case of power outages, cut firewood to stay warm in the winter. We were very independent, so survival was just the way of everyday life. People today are very dependent and will starve quickly when the local fast food joint closes or the the c-store goes out of business.
 
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