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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, what kind of snake is this, is it poisonous?

My dad and I stopped on a 4-wheeler trail to move a log. Neither of us saw the snake until we started to walk away. luckily neither of us was bit.

Can you see the snake in this picture? Its at the bottom of the log on the right hand side.
Automotive tire Tire Off-roading Vehicle Soil


Here is a little closer picture, can you see the snake now?
Soil Grass Tree Plant


And here we are, a close up
Soil Scrap Plant Snake Reptile
 

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Antique Nurse
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Yep! Copperhead - bad snake...

Looks like a big one, too.
 

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Airborne
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Yes, harmless to Kev maybe, but what if one of Kevs family members was off roading along this same trail, got out to move the same log, and got bit and died? Different people, different situations, different solutions. I would have killed it too, you would not have, we both have our reasons.
 

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Google search a picture of the results of a copperhead snake bite and take a good look. Warning not for anyone with a weak stomach ! Also when I worked in a hospital had the chance to see the first hand results of a copperhead snakebite. A five year girl that was playing in her backyard and the so called harmless snake bite her on the lower leg, after 4 1/2 days in the hospital doctors removed her leg just below the knee to save her life because of the infection and poison of the so called harmless snake.
 

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You are much more likely to die in a car crash than from a snake bite. Just sayin'...
http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/uvahealth/adult_nontrauma/snake.cfm

Preventing snake bites:

Some bites, such as those inflicted when you accidentally step on a snake in the woods, are nearly impossible to prevent. However, there are precautions that can reduce your chances of being bitten by a snake, including the following:

* Leave snakes alone. Many people are bitten because they try to kill a snake or get too close to it.
* Stay out of tall grass unless you wear thick leather boots and remain on hiking paths as much as possible.
* Keep hands and feet out of areas you cannot see. Do not pick up rocks or firewood unless you are out of a snake's striking distance.
* Be cautious and alert when climbing rocks.
 

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A friend of the Site
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Kimmy,

I killed a copperhead a few weeks ago, that was next to the house. My brother in law and me killed a copperhead, within 5 feet of a wooden toy play set for my and his kids.

Every year we attempt to mnimize the snake activity around the huse and toys, by burning the leaves and keeping the grass cut down. But a snake that close to house or the toy's is unacceptable to me.

For me it is part of sharing the area as long as they stay away i won't search them out, but if they get close i have to protect my family.

I would have done the same thing as Kev did by the way
 
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A friend of the Site
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That is good planning, snakes are not the most important threat around our place either, but like any other threat when they appear they should be dealt with. Just as you would any other threat.
I take precautions for all kinds of threats, i personally don't enjoy killing them, but when you consider the most probable result of not dealing with one near the house, well i would call it prudent.
I do applaud your prioritizing, and a two legged snake is probably more of a threat, but i carry extra water and a tire repair kit, i have need both to fix my vehicle but the nail in the tire is more likely, but that does not keep me from carrying the water also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
copperhead snake

My dad and I were moving a log from across a trail, when the snake came out. At that very time, yes the snake was a threat. It caught us both off guard, with our hands full of this log that had blown over the 4-wheeler trail.

So just imagine having both your hands busy, and out crawls a deadly snake. Your holding this log up so you can not just run away.

What do you do? Decisions, decisions.
 

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Elitist Gun Snob
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I wouldn't call it deadly Kev...what do you weigh? I'd guess to look at you, without knowing how tall you are, that you're around 180-200lbs. Now maybe to a small child, but the copperheads in North America have a comparatively mild venom. Maybe mild isn't the right word....how about medium? No reason to blow things out of proportion. You simply disturbed it when you moved it's shelter. It isn't deadly to you (unless you have a heart condition), but I understand why you killed it.
 

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I have killed my fair share of rattle snakes, but not any more!

Here are some FACTS!

Of the 10,000 or so rattle snake bites per year in the USA, the average number of deaths from being bitten/envenomed is ONE per year.

The majority of rattle snake "bites" on humans and animals do not include envenomization! Most often, when a rattle snake strikes, its fangs will only break the skin, or penetrate very slightly. While this may cause an infection, it is usually from the open wound, not an envenomization. Rattle snakes really have to "work" to pump their toxic venom through their fangs.

The majority of rattle snake bites are caused by being STOOPID....handling them as if they're not dangerous! You are probably aware of the "cults" that use rattle snakes in their "rituals". Lots of "macho" folks will think that they can capture a rattle snake with their bare hands....if they can sneak up on them from behind! I know, for I've DONE it....but was also successful! I haven't been STOOPID for many years, though!

Rattle snakes will NOT (generally) strike at you unless they are coiled. Even when they are coiled and can strike, they are limited in the distance that they can strike....the rule is that they need 2/3rds of their length on the ground, as a "base" for their strike. If you run into, say, a 6-footer that is coiled, a safe distance is a minimum of 2 feet....but even better if you're further away!

Rattle snakes do NOT go looking for humans to bite! For that matter, their eyesight is very poor! They can sense you through smell and vibrations in the ground, though. Their forked tongues are their "sniffers" that enhance their front-mounted nostrils.

Rattle snakes are NOT cold-blooded! While they may "sun" themselves, it's not to get a tan! During the hottest point of the day, they are usually in their dark and cool dens. Most of their hunting is done during the evening hours.

Anywhere you can find lizards, chances are that there are also rattle snakes. Lizards aren't exactly the favorite prey of rattle snakes, but they're both reptiles.

BENEFICIAL FACT! Rattle snakes eat rodents, and rodents often carry diseases! Snakes are IMMUNE to those diseases, including rabies! Funny thing, a buddy of mine was attacked by a rabid kangaroo rat in the desert! The furry, long-tailed little critter was "cute", but had some milky froth on its mouth, and since it had been so aggressive, it caused my buddy to realize that it probably had rabies. Any fur-bearing animal can get rabies (bats have fur, and are often found to be carrying rabies).

MYTH! "Small, young rattle snakes are more venemous and more deadly than full-sized adults". WRONG! It's just that the smaller, younger rattle snakes tend to be more aggressive than the full-sized adults.

MYTH! "If you are bitten by a rattle snake, you will need to go through the anti-venin innoculation procedure". Well, only if venom was introduced into your blood stream.....and not even ALL the time! Most often, if a rattle snake bite victim remains calm, and the bite area is immobilized, treatment will be relatively simple. By the way, the anti-venin doses are VERY expensive....$800 per dose....and usually 7 or 8 doses are necessary!

MYTH! "A snake bite kit, followed by a tourniquet, then rushed to a medical facility will work". I think that most physicians have agreed that the "good old" snake bite kits are USELESS, as are tourniquets. Personally, I think that levelling the bite area, with it held downward, so that it can bleed freely is probably the best. Of course, immediate medical treatment is necessary, but that doesn't mean that you need to do "warp" speed to get there! Many rattle snake bite victims have driven themselves to the nearest medical facilities, but it's best if someone else does the driving.....safely!

As I said, I used to kill rattle snakes. I often go out to the desert, so I've done a lot of homework on rattlers for my own education. Now, if I run into a rattle snake, and it's too close to my camp, I'll relocate the slithery thing....and try to find a "happy hunting grounds" for it....where there are signs of desert rodents! Heck, I even made my own snake snare that doubles as a walking stick! So far, I've relocated about a dozen Mojave Green rattle snakes, which are supposedly the most venemous of all the rattle snake species.

In closing, I think that the chances of survival from having been bitten by a rattle snake are BETTER than your chances of surviving hanta virus....which is in dried-out rodent poop that can become airborn and inhaled into your lungs without you knowing it!
 
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