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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put away my folders for a while. Surprisingly, I have quite a few right at 4 inches. There are larger folders available but I figured I'm beating a dead horse and I'll never be able to get a folder into action as fast as a fixed blade under pressure, so I moved to fixed blades.

I'm going to give ~4 to 5.5 inch blades a shot. The smaller daggers with 4 inch blade stock are much faster to draw, get into action, and are close to a length where if used it might not incur a felony when used in self defense. You cannot draw a knife anyway unless your life is in peril.

I'm using two Les George Galvo Daggers in CTS-XHP for now.
 

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These are my go twos
The skinner is around 6”
But it’s a good all purpose blade
I have a Bowie also about the same size but it’s not as handy .
The new buck 110 is very lite
The small Kershaw flips open with one hand .
I’m not to worried about the size of the blade .
I carry a 1911 and that’s my go to for self defense
 

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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thinking about it sometimes. What's a little knife going to do? Slash slashes?
I have 2 - 4 inch Les George Galvo Daggers, that I will wear "near" 3 o'clock and 9 oclock. And I have a 5.5 inch dagger that I will wear at 1 o'clock.

This is the ultimate knife self defense system for folks walking around in plain clothes.

I've also studied at least 5 different Filipino Knife martial arts. So I'm trained to use them.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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There's a folding dagger that is surprisingly easy to open and it's fast when you learn how to operate it. I have the larger version and I bought my ex-wife a smaller version:

Cold Steel Ti Light:

Tableware Guitar accessory Tool Kitchen utensil Musical instrument accessory


Note the serrated "wings" where the blade meets the handle. They're meant to cause friction when the knife is drawn against the pant leg (at thigh level). I can open mine very quickly. If you buy one, beware! They're VERY sharp out of the box. Like I said, there's the longer and shorter versions.

 

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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's a folding dagger that is surprisingly easy to open and it's fast when you learn how to operate it. I have the larger version and I bought my ex-wife a smaller version:

Cold Steel Ti Light:

View attachment 427972

Note the serrated "wings" where the blade meets the handle. They're meant to cause friction when the knife is drawn against the pant leg (at thigh level). I can open mine very quickly. If you buy one, beware! They're VERY sharp out of the box. Like I said, there's the longer and shorter versions.

I really need to buy one of those!
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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I really need to buy one of those!
You'd really like it. Tight tolerances; very sturdy in-line lock; extremely sharp; and Cold Steel quality. When it's open it almost looks like a sword. Hahaha
 

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Well, first, the fasted folder I’ve ever been able to deploy and put into action (training), has been Emerson folders with the “wave” feature (Cold Steel, Spyderco, and CRKT have versions as well). There’s no comparison, even with automatic pocket knives.

Size does matter, but I think many over-estimate how much blade they really need. I have read that 2.5” to 3” can be enough to reach vital organs if thrust with force. I would think 3.5-4” would be a more reliable size difference, but much depends on employment and actual use.

My reasoning is now a little more different. I have reduced my pocket folder carrying days to carrying a Leatherman FREE P4 more often. I simply want a pocket tool that offers more versatility than a single blade pocket folder and not have to carry a multitool on my belt. However, it’s not a defensive tool; hence the need to carrying a smaller fixed blade.

My current pocket carry choice resurrected carrying a smaller fixed blade (sometimes for utility, sometimes more for a dedicated defensive blade. If I can carry a knife, I can carry a gun, so my choices are for weak-hand carry and draw. I’ve added a couple other options, but I’ve found the ring-handled (or fingered?) knives best suited to a fast employment for my weak-hand. Coming up in an icepick grip to either slash or stab, gives me options. Again, these are meant for employment when my strong-arm/gun-arm may be pinned, occupied/grabbed, or injured and my defensive knife is mostly meant to just employ to create space for drawing my pistol.

Size matters as well. I know some who have comfortable carried a 7+inch fixed blade, but that’s not for me. How you carry matters and the sheath/carry system is as important as the knife. Secure retention, ease and speed of access, and safety if you take a tumble are important factors.



Thinking about it sometimes. What's a little knife going to do? Slash slashes?
Yes, slashing may not be incapacitating, but for me, the blade is a weak-hand back-up weapon and something that can help me create distance to draw my handgun. Most of my training was done in a combat environment where close quarters (advising) was a common occurrence (vehicles, narrow hallways and stairwells, bathrooms, and offices). I found the Colonel “punching” knife was the best suited to my needs. I needed something I could draw when seated with as little as 6-8” of space to employ; punching was better suited than slashing for that situation.

I have some smaller “utility/defensive” blades I carry as well, like the Spyderco Street-Beat, TOPS Scalpel 2, or the Bradford Guardian. I can go a little bigger during the winter, but these are good utility/defensive blades when paired with a multitool and handgun for primary self-defense.

ROCK6
 

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Almost short enough to not incur a felony is a sad, sad thing.

If it’s self defense, it shouldn’t matter if it’s a rock, a switchblade, a sword or a handgun.

My blades aren’t for defense, I’m ok with a folder. If things are so bad that I NEED my knife for defense…well, that’s about 4-5 screwed up steps and failures down the decision chain for me.

All that said, there’s nothing wrong with small daggers. They’ll do the job, and do it even better in trained hands.
 

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I never saw any point to fixed blades under 6", but that is a matter of taste.

That being said, this general notion of fixed blades being faster than folders is generally false for concealed carry, because concealed carry means under the jacket, and that assumes the jacket is open... (Reaching under the jacket never seemed practical to me) A folder can be in a pocket on the OUTSIDE of a jacket, an immense advantage in access, unless you assume the jacket is always open. An open jacket means that, unless the fixed blade is carried small of the back (which I only rarely found comfortable), the fixed blade is easy to see on the kidney, and only slightly harder to see suspended from a shoulder harness. Even the shoulder harness is really concealed only with an additional loose wool shirt over it, which makes reaching for it slower still, but slightly less so for kidney carry.
 

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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, first, the fasted folder I’ve ever been able to deploy and put into action (training), has been Emerson folders with the “wave” feature (Cold Steel, Spyderco, and CRKT have versions as well). There’s no comparison, even with automatic pocket knives.

Size does matter, but I think many over-estimate how much blade they really need. I have read that 2.5” to 3” can be enough to reach vital organs if thrust with force. I would think 3.5-4” would be a more reliable size difference, but much depends on employment and actual use.

My reasoning is now a little more different. I have reduced my pocket folder carrying days to carrying a Leatherman FREE P4 more often. I simply want a pocket tool that offers more versatility than a single blade pocket folder and not have to carry a multitool on my belt. However, it’s not a defensive tool; hence the need to carrying a smaller fixed blade.

My current pocket carry choice resurrected carrying a smaller fixed blade (sometimes for utility, sometimes more for a dedicated defensive blade. If I can carry a knife, I can carry a gun, so my choices are for weak-hand carry and draw. I’ve added a couple other options, but I’ve found the ring-handled (or fingered?) knives best suited to a fast employment for my weak-hand. Coming up in an icepick grip to either slash or stab, gives me options. Again, these are meant for employment when my strong-arm/gun-arm may be pinned, occupied/grabbed, or injured and my defensive knife is mostly meant to just employ to create space for drawing my pistol.

Size matters as well. I know some who have comfortable carried a 7+inch fixed blade, but that’s not for me. How you carry matters and the sheath/carry system is as important as the knife. Secure retention, ease and speed of access, and safety if you take a tumble are important factors.





Yes, slashing may not be incapacitating, but for me, the blade is a weak-hand back-up weapon and something that can help me create distance to draw my handgun. Most of my training was done in a combat environment where close quarters (advising) was a common occurrence (vehicles, narrow hallways and stairwells, bathrooms, and offices). I found the Colonel “punching” knife was the best suited to my needs. I needed something I could draw when seated with as little as 6-8” of space to employ; punching was better suited than slashing for that situation.

I have some smaller “utility/defensive” blades I carry as well, like the Spyderco Street-Beat, TOPS Scalpel 2, or the Bradford Guardian. I can go a little bigger during the winter, but these are good utility/defensive blades when paired with a multitool and handgun for primary self-defense.

ROCK6
What can you tell me about the Benchmade knife, 4th from the left, AND the Cut 4.0?

Is the Benchmade knife comfortable to hold in your hand? Are those ridges on the handle bad news for a tight grip?

I really like the Cut 4.0. Anything you can say about that knife?
 

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What hell, pay attention
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I carried a Gerber MK I for a number of years. A MK II as well. I prefer knives like this have a guard, and most of the smaller knives dont seem to. Lately, its been a Brit F/S Commando. Decent knife that is still issued and isnt collectible, takes a decent edge, and no big loss if I have to ditch it or give it up. Main reason I quit carrying the Gerbers.

Dont know about where you are, but here "daggers" are verboten. I can legally carry a gun, but I cant legally carry the knife. Go figure.

As far as the slashing comments go, realistically, for the most part, slashes to the right targets, will usually be easier, and most likely settle things quicker, and with less damage to you than stabs. Proper targeting can and will deny the other guy of the use of their hands, arms, legs, etc, and will also usually "start the clock" on blood loss that needs to be addressed within a fairly short time frame (2-3 minutes) or they will be unconscious and/or dead. But you do need to know your anatomy and know what and why to target. Just wildly "slashing" isnt going to be very productive, at least from a physical standpoint.
 

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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I carried a Gerber MK I for a number of years. A MK II as well. I prefer knives like this have a guard, and most of the smaller knives dont seem to. Lately, its been a Brit F/S Commando. Decent knife that is still issued and isnt collectible, takes a decent edge, and no big loss if I have to ditch it or give it up. Main reason I quit carrying the Gerbers.

Dont know about where you are, but here "daggers" are verboten. I can legally carry a gun, but I cant legally carry the knife. Go figure.

As far as the slashing comments go, realistically, for the most part, slashes to the right targets, will usually be easier, and most likely settle things quicker, and with less damage to you than stabs. Proper targeting can and will deny the other guy of the use of their hands, arms, legs, etc, and will also usually "start the clock" on blood loss that needs to be addressed within a fairly short time frame (2-3 minutes) or they will be unconscious and/or dead. But you do need to know your anatomy and know what and why to target. Just wildly "slashing" isnt going to be very productive, at least from a physical standpoint.
I agree with you 100%! I'd be better off getting a firearm to carry. The knife laws are dumb and dumber. I cannot wait to get out of Illinois to an all around better state.

I've download many anatomy pics to my desktop. I need to study them constantly. There are good targets but you have to know how to hit them and when to press an aggressor so that you can hit the targets.

I've dabbled in around a dozen martial arts, 5 of them Filipino knife arts and I study tape occasionally. I'm no James Bond though, 62 and feeling every bit of it.
 

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The Black Death
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I carried a Gerber MK I for a number of years. A MK II as well. I prefer knives like this have a guard, and most of the smaller knives dont seem to. Lately, its been a Brit F/S Commando. Decent knife that is still issued and isnt collectible, takes a decent edge, and no big loss if I have to ditch it or give it up. Main reason I quit carrying the Gerbers.

Dont know about where you are, but here "daggers" are verboten. I can legally carry a gun, but I cant legally carry the knife. Go figure.

As far as the slashing comments go, realistically, for the most part, slashes to the right targets, will usually be easier, and most likely settle things quicker, and with less damage to you than stabs. Proper targeting can and will deny the other guy of the use of their hands, arms, legs, etc, and will also usually "start the clock" on blood loss that needs to be addressed within a fairly short time frame (2-3 minutes) or they will be unconscious and/or dead. But you do need to know your anatomy and know what and why to target. Just wildly "slashing" isnt going to be very productive, at least from a physical standpoint.
I have plenty of really nice daggers, and I plan to buy more in the 5 to 6.5 inch blade, but as you say, they are illegal to carry.
 

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Old Soldier
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I wear fixed blades, always. I find that more than 5" in length makes it awkward to get into my truck.
I would prefer a Ka-Bar, and sometimes wear one.
I recently found the Ka-Bar Junior, which has a 5" blade, mine came in a "tactical" sheath that locks the blade in without a fastening strap, yet is simple and easy to draw.

I'm just a simple Country Boy, ain't interested in designer model high priced blades. I just want a backup to my snub nose revolver.
 
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