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I was out camping with some friends last weekend and after spending the first night, which was rather cold, my friend told me I should have slept in my sleeping bag without my clothes on, saying it would be warmer.

I was wondering if anyone here had any experience with that, or knew whether it was true or not?

Cheers
 

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Only time I ever kept my clothes on at night was in combat. I prefer to sleep in gym shorts (PT uniform) because it's more comfy. I get a better nights sleep, and I'm more effective once I get up. I do know that you'll be warmer if your clothes get a chance to dry out from any sweating you did in them. Get a warmer bag if you're cold.
 

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Logged bag time

Years ago, if I logged my time in a bag. I have little over a year in a bag.
In mild month. No clothes other than skivvies. IN winter when I have to jump up to pee, fix tent, "bump" in the night..etc. No clothes and 10 deg weather are tough. I sleep in long underwear. Or Patagonia micro puff jacket. Neck gator and balaclava. There have a been a few times I was in full clothes, (sans boots) I guess what works best for you and not what you read or heard.
I read a lot of things but found them to be untrue or not fitting my needs. Everyone is diff.
 

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I was out camping with some friends last weekend and after spending the first night, which was rather cold, my friend told me I should have slept in my sleeping bag without my clothes on, saying it would be warmer.

I was wondering if anyone here had any experience with that, or knew whether it was true or not?

Cheers
I have heard that and tried that and It did not work. I was warmer with the extra layer that clothing provided.

I heard that the Eskimo people of many years ago liked to sleep naked: if this is true then I suspect it is to allow any dampness to leave their clothing.
 

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If your clothes aren't wet and your still cold leave them on.

I slept in my goretex, bdus and ranger panties for about 3 weeks in South Korea, even in my sleeping bag I was freezing my nuts, doubt I would even be able to have fallen asleep without the extra layers. Mornings were painful.
 

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Most bags are rated to a certain temperature using the assumption you will be wearing sleepwear of some kind. Ultralight backpackers use a lighter/less-warm bag but factor in wearing all their clothes (long underwear and down jacket) to compensate.

So yes, what your friend told you is a myth. It does sound like you need a warmer bag though!
 

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I wouldn't sleep with no clothes on because 1. I always get up at least once a night to go the bathroom and 2. I sleep cold.

What I do do is change out of the clothes I am wearing and put on something that is dry (I haven't been sitting around the fire sweating in). That is usually a base layer, wool socks and sometimes a wool hat. If it is going to be really cold I will add a fleece layer over the top. You can also warm up a bottle of water wrapped in a towel and toss it in your sleeping bag. Or put a couple hand warmers in your sleeping bag before you go to bed.

The key is dry, so change your clothes right before bed. I also open my bag up during the day so any sweat that may have accumulated when I slept has a chance to dry out during the day. Also, lay your sleeping clothes out as best as possible so they can dry during the day

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

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Certainly I sleep more comfortable with out clothes restricting blood flow. However sleeping with a stocking cap can help get through a cold night.

Since clothes and sleeping bag are simply a form of insulation, than it follows that the more dead air space you can create, the more you will improve heat retention. The only problem than is to handle the amount of moisture your body gives off.
 

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reluctant sinner
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If your clothing is at all damp or really tight and restricting you will be warmer without it. A nice set of loose polypropylene long johns that you only wear in bed will help you be warmer and keep your bag cleaner, much easier to wash/dry the bed clothes than the bag. A beanie and booties can help too. A good pad under you. +1 for a leak proof hot water bottle or two.

Air out your bed clothes and bag every morning while you are making breakfast and striking camp. Do the same thing as soon as camp is set up.
 

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All depends on what the clothing you have on is. Does it allow your body to "breathe" allowing moisture (sweat) to wick away from your body or does it trap it and hold it close. Most people wear clothing made from cotton which will not wick moisture away from your body or "breathe". Some synthetics like goretex or polypropolyne allow the body to breathe. Ever hear the adage "cotton kills".
 

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Unless you have a sleeping bag which is so tight that wearing clothes in it compresses the insulation, you'll always sleep warmer with extra (dry) clothes on. If you're cold at home, you add insulation too, adding insulation won't make you colder. It's common sense :p
 

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In cold climates/conditions "layers" is the key to "warmth".

That holds true inside a sleeping bag.
The only difference being, the cold rating of the sleeping bag.
A sleeping bag that is warm at -30F differs significantly from one warm at 40F.

Camping out in mild weather, I generally sleep in sox, sweat pants/shirt.
With foot ware I can slip on next to me.
The reason being, the need to get up/out to relieve yourself.
And/or the need to get up/out to deal with anything else.

Unwise to be "naked" in any of those circumstances.

In cold winter conditions, I generally sleep in sox, down booties, insulated long underwear bottoms, insulated flannel hoody & a watch cap.

In either situation above, you can get out of your bag, slide on foot ware (& a coat if need be) and go outside to deal with about anything.

In all camping out conditions, I always sleep with a web belt with attached loaded sidearm, extra ammo clip, multi-tool, fixed blade & flashlight next to me. I can grab & put on (with or without a coat) in an instant.

Ever had a bear or raccoon rummage your camp at night? Ever had a drunk, high druggy or thief intrude in your camp at night? Ever woke up to another nearby camper screaming in panic? Ever woke and had to deal with a serious medical emergency at night. I have.

Being NAKED in any of those circumstances isn't a good thing.
 

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I was out camping with some friends last weekend and after spending the first night, which was rather cold, my friend told me I should have slept in my sleeping bag without my clothes on, saying it would be warmer.

I was wondering if anyone here had any experience with that, or knew whether it was true or not?

Cheers
This is an army truth/myth...

It comes from the fact that Joes (Soldiers) have a habit of A. climbing in their fart sacks still fully dressed, getting hot and sweaty then the next morning they are damp and so is their sleeping bag. OR B. getting wet, bring their wet cloths into the fart sack which makes it wet. The problem is they then don't have time to let the sleeping bag dry out because they are on the move and by day 3 their fart sack has lost most of it's insulation properties and it's colds-ville for the rest of the FTX.

The truth is if it gets colder than your sleeping bag is rated for wearing insulation layers to bed is a viable and time proven method.

If the temperature is higher than your sleeping bag limit you are going to generate excess heat. If you're not smart about how you deal with that excess heat you could be setting yourself up for failure.

In most cases, people tend to over estimate how cold their sleeping needs to be and get bags rated colder than they will actual experience. So telling someone to strip down before getting in their bag may not be a bad idea if that is the case.

EDIT IN: By strip down I don't mean buck naked but down to skivvies
 

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Wet and/or damp clothes are not good to sleep in. I carry as set of poly long underware, top and bottoms with socks. Fluff up your bag before you climb in. It is the loft that retains heat. If it is going to be really cold, I carry a cheap fleece bag and put it inside my down bag. never put anything that collapses your loft on a down bag. A balaclava or knit hat works good. When you shop for a bag, a double zipper is very good. opening the bag from the bottom will release heat on those hot nights. Also If the mornings are dry, air out your bag. let the moisture trapped in the night evaporate.
 

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Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
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A sleeping bag liner or sheet(s) are easier to clean and dry than the sleeping bag, and really help keep the bag clean and dry, regardless of what you wear or don't wear to sleep. No matter what, wearing the clothing you wore all day in the sleeping bag is a bad idea because of moisture, dirt, and bug repellent.
 
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