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wide awake
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143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hubby has obstructive sleep apnea and requires an electrical source to run his CPAP at night. We do have a gas-powered generator and a small Xantrex PowerPack, but I'm looking at more long-term options. The best thing I've been able to come up with so far is the Xantrex 1500 watt PowerPack and possibly couple it with one or two 60 watt solar panels. I'm really not worried about running anything other than his CPAP if the grid went down for months (it wouldn't be pleasant, but his well-being is paramount to everything else). I actually think I'm more concerned about this than he is. :eek:

If anyone has other ideas or suggestions, I'd dearly love to hear them. I'm not sure the above set up will work as well as I have in mind, but we've been pleased with the smaller Xantrex unit we own.
 

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Displaced Texan
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501 Posts
if everything fails, see if he can sleep half-way reclined in a lazyboy....this worked for a family member of mine when they gave up their master bedroom for their parents. They had no idea this took an edge off the apnea like it did. It doesn't require electricity, and if he positions himself just right, he could get a lot of quality sleep without any mechanics. Worth a try.
 

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one day at a time
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2,478 Posts
Also slumpted over table positioned 2 inches below sternum can help they do that at the hospital On the cardiac units to help till the order comes in for a b/c pap.

Also what about a drycell deep cycle ran thru an inverter charge thrue the solaer panales! I was thinking that could work. if you can get enough energy through them to help keep the battery up.
 

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Premium Member
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2,025 Posts
Sleep apnea can amerliorated, for some people, without using CPAP. I was diagnosed 2 years ago, and have had lots of success through a combination of weight loss and sleeping on my side (the sleep study found my apnea was much worse when I slept on my back).

Just my .02

HippieSurvivalist
 

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one day at a time
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2,478 Posts
Sleep apnea can amerliorated, for some people, without using CPAP. I was diagnosed 2 years ago, and have had lots of success through a combination of weight loss and sleeping on my side (the sleep study found my apnea was much worse when I slept on my back).

Just my .02

HippieSurvivalist
Very true weight has a lot to do with the disorder.

Also I dont know yalls ages nor is it my buiness. In the right age if possiable to afford. The surgery is very affective to fix this problem. Again age is a factor. But something worth looking into if he can be canidate for it.
 

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wide awake
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143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He did lose a significant amount of weight, and unfortunately it didn't help. The dr. said his throat collapses when he sleeps, and even surgery won't resolve the problem. He's had several sleep studies, and always the same conclusion.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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22,122 Posts
Too bad theres not some sort of trachea reinforcement that can be done, kind of like the woven fibers that keep fuel lines from collapsing at gas stations. were I a surgeon I'd suggest a study.
 

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Endure-Adapt-Overcome
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332 Posts
Oral devices (also called oral appliances or mandibular repositioning devices) are sometimes used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). They push the tongue and jaw forward, which makes the airway larger and improves airflow. This also decreases the chance that tissue will collapse and narrow the airway when you breathe in.
Oral breathing devices are sometimes a reasonable alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Although oral breathing devices generally do not work as well as CPAP, they may be considered for people who have mild sleep apnea. Prefer not to use or who have failed CPAP treatment. Had surgery that did not work. Tried behavioral changes that did not work.

Choose a dentist or orthodontist who has experience fitting these devices. And go back to your dentist for regular check-ups to make sure the device still fits well.

Little research has been done on oral breathing devices. Small studies indicate that they may improve breathing at night and reduce daytime sleepiness.They may be helpful for people who are at a healthy weight.

Possible problems with devices that fit inside the mouth include:

Buildup of saliva in the mouth, requiring frequent swallowing.
Discomfort, especially in the morning. The devices can be uncomfortable, and people tend not to use them over the long term.
Damage to teeth, soft tissues in the mouth, and the jaw joints. So it is important that a skilled dentist or orthodontist fit the device to prevent these problems.
If you use an oral breathing device to treat sleep apnea, use it every night. Excess saliva in your mouth and mild discomfort should become less bothersome with regular use.

An oral breathing device used for a child with sleep apnea must be refitted periodically as the child grows.
 

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one day at a time
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2,478 Posts
Too bad theres not some sort of trachea reinforcement that can be done, kind of like the woven fibers that keep fuel lines from collapsing at gas stations. were I a surgeon I'd suggest a study.
They already do have devices like that. called stints. They put them in the vessales and arterys near and in the heart after blockages have been removed. It just take someone to research and posse the idea of this being affective.

The down side of this would be the muscles contracting to help with the opening to close to prevent choking and swallowing.

This also could be prevented by an upper stint being place at the top of the esophagus for the support of the opening. Preventing colapseing of the upper region. Acept for the fact that it needs to be able to close to prevent choking

There just needs to be studies done to figure out if this is a posiability,And how it could be done.

I still say figure out if you can charge a battery with the solar cells. Try that for now.
 

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Watchful and Hopeful
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122 Posts
http://www.directhomemedical.com/machines-cpap-bipap/battery-pack-respironics-cpap-bipap.html

http://www.portableoxygenman.com/

http://www.cpapsupplyusa.com/Puritan-Bennett-Rechargeable-Portable-Battery-Pack-Y-CGVP7120.aspx

Not sure if this helps but maybe something in the 12v portable line. Then no need of of a battery array soley for th CPAP unit. You could charge up during the day with the genny or even your car. Maybe with one of the solar powered chargers available commercially you could charge while the genny is not in use. Plus, it is a great option to be portable and not dependent on AC current in a bail out situation
 

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I feel sorry for you hubby. I'm 28, not too overweight, and I have apnea also. Worst thing ever. I rarely even use my CPAP. I would agree to a battery pack, inverter and solar cells. But solar isn't going to be strong enough. I would get a stationary bike and fit it with a small generator. That way you dont need a noisey gas generator and gas to go with it. Just make sure you have enough food on hand cause you will be burning calories with a setup like this. Good Luck
 
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