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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering taking a jigsaw to cut cut several 6'' by 2' holes in tin roof of my coup and replacing the removed tin with Plexiglas. I'll weatherproof it with caulk.

Has anybody else heard of doing this?
 

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I have heard and seen pics on the internet. I used a plastic roofing material for mine but it is not straight sunlight. Does give a little light in. Don't see how it could not work or be bad.
 

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The roof of my chicken room is metal alternating with fiberglass skylight panels. I love all the natural light the skylights provide. We also used the skylight panels on some areas of the sidewalls, allowing in even more light.

The panels fit into the metal roof panels, which provides a great seal, and the panels can also support a snow load. If you get measurable snowfall, the plexiglass may not hold up that well to heavy snow.
 

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We had skylights in our first coop but found, during winter, skylights would seldom function berceuse the snow stayed on our roof (in our climate) most of the winter. Now the snow did provide fine insulation so next time we put in used windows facing East to catch the morning sun to warm them up. In summer, the skylights would really heat up the coop with noon sun shine just about the time when shade would have been better appreciated. This last part might be a consideration with your South location, especially if you have broody hens nest bound in the heat .
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We had skylights in our first coop but found, during winter, skylights would seldom function berceuse the snow stayed on our roof (in our climate) most of the winter. Now the snow did provide fine insulation so next time we put in used windows facing East to catch the morning sun to warm them up. In summer, the skylights would really heat up the coop with noon sun shine just about the time when shade would have been better appreciated. This last part might be a consideration with your South location, especially if you have broody hens nest bound in the heat .
My concern is that my birds may not be getting enough sunshine. The pen and coup is located in a wooded area. Snow only lasts for a few weeks at the most around here. Leaves covering the skylights may turn into another a chore and one that I hadn't considered.
 

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You are going to have a difficult time sealing around the glass. My father-in-law did that in a rabbit pen (in a covered walk way) and never got it not to leak.

It might be easier to remove a metal roofing panel and replace it with a fiberglass one. If you are using compatible panels of course.

I think the natural light and what little you might pick up in heat gain during the winter would be worth the effort.
 

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My concern is that my birds may not be getting enough sunshine.
If you have a chicken yard for them to run in, sunlight should not be a problem. In the winter, they can have a short day problem. As they lay best with exposure to 12to 14 hrs of light and our December sun will set about 3:30 pm or so. Then you will need artificial light to keep the girls on the job. Fortunately, it doesn’t take much, about 40 watts on a timer for our 100 Sq Ft coop. In my experience, chickens will run around on even sub-zero days if protected from the wind especially if it is sunny.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are going to have a difficult time sealing around the glass. My father-in-law did that in a rabbit pen (in a covered walk way) and never got it not to leak.

It might be easier to remove a metal roofing panel and replace it with a fiberglass one. If you are using compatible panels of course.

I think the natural light and what little you might pick up in heat gain during the winter would be worth the effort.
It's not that big of a coup so I might just use all fiberglass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you have a chicken yard for them to run in, sunlight should not be a problem. In the winter, they can have a short day problem. As they lay best with exposure to 12to 14 hrs of light and our December sun will set about 3:30 pm or so. Then you will need artificial light to keep the girls on the job. Fortunately, it doesn’t take much, about 40 watts on a timer for our 100 Sq Ft coop. In my experience, chickens will run around on even sub-zero days if protected from the wind especially if it is sunny.
I was hoping to get away from artificial light altogether but it may be a lost cause. I'll post my results later.
 
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