Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,588 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Test:
To determine the difference of Cold Steel old Carbon V and new SK5 steel.

Took the back side of a Cold Steel SK5 Recon Scout and smacked it on the back side of Cold Steel Carbon V SRK. Then smacked the SRK on the Recon.

The SK5 has larger dents from either collision. The Carbon V seems harder than the SK5.

From watching the guy at knifetests.com destroy a 1055 steel GI Tanto, I have deduced that SK5 being approximately 1085 carbon steel is pretty tough, maybe a bit more brittle. Therefore the Carbon V appears to be more brittle, holds an edge better, yet the SK5 is tougher, can take more pounding.

I realize heat treating, unseen flaws, environmental conditions effect the performance of steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Very interesting, but I'm not a big fan of knifetests personally because they don't seem to be all that accurate tests. What's really good in my oppinion is Nutnfancy's videos on youtube. He gives great knife reviews there and a lot of good insight. He said the SK-5 still holds a pretty good edge, isn't a huge difference between Carbon V and SK-5. All depends on heat treatment as well. You can also look at cutleryscience.com and they got some good insight on the trailmaster, Recon Scout, and a bunch of other knives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,588 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nutinfancy's Carbon V Recon broke. That's what started me thinking. I'm thinking the SK5 is less brittle.

The funniest thing about knife test that is really funny is the angle gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
First, I believe in real use tests and not banging metal against metal or poking holes in the hood of a car. Apart from the military, I get the feeling that most people torturing knives do not use them for regular tasks: skinning, cutting food, carving wood, cutting leather, etc.

Second, for the most part when you buy from one company you are getting the same thing ie. if they heat treatr poorly then all the knives will be done poorly. Buy from a company that makes good knives all across the board, then it just comes down to steel types and how you like your tangs/handles.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top