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It really amazes me as to the “techniques” of various martial arts I have seen that remind me of the stuff pulled on play lots and schoolyards, at least years ago when boys were boys. This is one of them, deashi-harai or advancing or forward foot sweep. This is simple to the extreme and useful in various applications. With properly applied force, one could, somewhat, gently bring your opponent down or really get in there and slam him.

Of course then you drive your knee into his sternum and beat the living snot out of him…

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Deashi Harai ala Judo....


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Deashi Harai is one the basic foot sweeps learned in the Martial Arts. As with most basic techniques, Deashi Harai has more variations than can be described here.

One common method used in Danzan-ryu Jujitsu is the outside-in method of sweeping an opponent's foot.

> It is accomplished by initially having a firm grip on the opponent while facing him or her.
> The attacker then moves the foot to the opposite side of his opponent (right foot to opponent's left side, or vice versa), to sweep the opponent's opposite leg out from underneath him.
> Simultaneously the upper body must compliment this push-pull motion with a great deal of being power being generated from the rotation of the hips.
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Deashi Harai (Advancing foot sweep)



1. Starting from the standard position
2. Make uke take a step backward with their left foot
3. Off balance them with a push-pull maneuver
4. Sweep uke's right foot with your left foot.
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Deashi-harai is the very first throw in Dai Ikkyo, the first group of eight throws in Kodokan Judo. It is considered a foot technique. Deashi Harai is the Advancing foot sweep. As your opponent is stepping forward with his right foot, instead of stepping straight back with your left foot, you step slightly back and to the right. This puts you in close and to the side, but you have moved back so your opponent is encouraged to continue forward. Then, as your opponent's right foot comes forward, you use your left foot to sweep it to your left. Timing is the key. You want to sweep the leg just before your opponent puts weight on it. Too soon and he just picks it back up. Too late and his weight is on it and it doesn't budge.



Kuzushi (unbalancing an opponent)
Begin in the right natural stance. Step back a bit farther than usual with your right foot and pull your opponent forward with your whole body. They will take a large step with there left foot.

Tsukuri (making an opening for the attack)
Loosen your right grip a bit and pull them toward you with your left hand so that they bring there right foot up close to there left.

Kake (execution of the technique)
Just as they are putting there right foot down, sweep it in the direction it is traveling with your left foot. As you sweep pull down hard with your left hand.
 

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In my experience as a student and a Jujitsu/Judo instructor I don't find this technique to be well suited for the beginner student, due to the fact that it is a foot sweep. Foot sweeps take more timing and skill to set up and execute than other Judo throws, such as sacrifice throws, hip throws or even hand throws. I find that it takes a lot of practice to be good at foot sweeps.

With that said, not everyone agrees with me. You for one, but the USMC for another. It appears that this technique is used generously in their knew martial arts program(can anyone confirm this?). However I maintain that I wouldn't teach it to beginners.

P.S. I once used this technique for real. Actually it was more of a Sasae Tsurikomi Ashi(still a foot sweep). The guy punched me in the chest, so I slammed him up against the wall with both hands on his collar. I said something really cool. Something like,"You made a big mistake," although admittedly I can't remember exactly what I said. Then I threw him with the foot sweep. He spun around, I knew he was falling and everything was going perfect.

I threw him alright. Right into a chair. He sat their looking up at me totally confused. I never saw that one coming, their were no chairs around in the DOJO when I had practiced this before. So I ended up going to something basic. I pulled him out of the chair, snapped him down to the ground, got my hooks in with back control, flattened him out and then choked him with a rear naked choke. Even though it didn't go perfectly, I'm still happy that I "field tested" a foot sweep. :D:
 

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^^^ a foot sweep does not 'take more timing and skill to set up and execute than other Judo throws, such as sacrifice throws'. a foot sweep is a basic move which is why it is taught in beginner classes and a sacrifice throw is advanced in comparison. there really is no way to argue this logically. for you to even say otherwise has made me question your credentials.

here is an instructional clip from expert village on the sacrifice throw taught by richard acuna. he even starts the clip saying that it is an advanced move.

http://www.expertvillage.com/video/26585_judo-martial-arts-sacrificethrow.htm

Richard Acuna, of Champion Martial Arts in Miami, Florida, is a Judo Black Belt with 35 years of experience competing and teaching adults and children. He has competed in Europe, South America and North America. Richard has placed always in the first 3 places in every event he has ever participated in local and international championships. At the age of 47, he now teaches and passes on the knowledge of the Martial Art to young up and coming Judokas.
 

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To perform a foot sweep you have to be up close. I don't let anyone get that close, I'm a "arms distance" kind of guy. If it appears we don't get along I damn sure ain't gonna let you walk up on me, thats called "1911A1" :thumb:
 

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To perform a foot sweep you have to be up close. I don't let anyone get that close, I'm a "arms distance" kind of guy. If it appears we don't get along I damn sure ain't gonna let you walk up on me, thats called "1911A1" :thumb:
I agree with this to a certain extent. Violence as a tool needs to be exectued as such. Allowing someone to come close just to apply a footsweep flies in the face of the survivalist and mature mindset. That said, one should have the outlook of a polymath, and appreciate that having skills in the combatitives is potentially useful.

From experience, I've found that those two sweeps highlighted above become less practicle as we get older and the division in weight and size between opponents increases. In real world experience, a strike followed by a throw with more leverage, ie a hip throw have been more reliable.
 

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YouTube - Karate Sweep check this one out. 7 seconds into the vid. I like this type of sweep better.
That sweep is an 'osoto-gari' or outside leg reap which is actually a throw but he used it as a sweep. Throws or sweeps don't have to be defensive. They can be VERY offensive and end a confrontation rather swiftly - especially on concrete or asphalt.
 

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To perform a foot sweep you have to be up close. I don't let anyone get that close, I'm a "arms distance" kind of guy. If it appears we don't get along I damn sure ain't gonna let you walk up on me, thats called "1911A1" :thumb:

I agree with you, but if for some reason you are disarmed...

I have argued with countless people for conceal carry that they should learn some empty handed combat. They always give me the "I don't need it I have a gun" spew. But a person can be taken by surprise and you may not always have your gun with you.
 

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Some martial arts are choreographed nonsense. I agree with that. In fact I spent years and lots of money learning this stuff. That is why I switched instructors and styles so many times. Not because I wasn't committed to learning, because I was determined to fined the stuff that wasn't fake.

The real stuff is out their, but their are not too many people who can teach it. This stuff dose work thought. This is not a theory, it's fact. Myself and many other people I know have used it for real.
 

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That foot sweep looks easy enough that I could probably pull it off. Good Post! Feel free to share more.



I agree with you, but if for some reason you
are disarmed...

I have argued with countless people for conceal carry that they should learn some empty handed combat. They always give me the "I don't need it I have a gun" spew. But a person can be taken by surprise and you may not always have your gun with you.
Let me expand on that:
Remember the 21 feet rule: The average person can cover a distance of 21 feet in 1.6 seconds. So you must be able to draw and fire 2 shots to center mass at least that fast while keeping the potential attacker at 21 feet away or greater. That is why I think it is good to learn at least a few unarmed defense moves. If the attacker gets to you after you have drawn your weapon but before you can fire you could be disarmed and the weapon used on you. So a quick footsweep sends your attacker to the ground, you back up while drawing your weapon. Unless he is a Ninja it will take at least 1 second for him to get back up and into the fight and now they are staring at the barrel. Just my .02
 
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