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I have several 5# bags of bread flour I'm saving just to be ahead if SHTF. Since its not really convienient to bake bread in the wilderness over a fire (you tell me a good way) then what about making simple biscuits from just bread flour (and yeast). Anyone have any good recipes or suggestions?
 

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Get yourself a good tri-legged dutch oven, you can bake anything outdoors in it using any recipe.
I have both a ten and a twelve inch oven that I use a lot and the look on some peoples faces when you bring out fresh baked biscuits is pricless.
 

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Mix flour, salt, pepper( have this pre mixed, is better) and a little water,,,,,,,,work it up( you want it a little dry, not sticky)........work into a "snake", spiral around a clean stick(bark stripped), hang over coals........it will bake........My fav for a day hike lunch is dough wrapped around cheese dogs, skewered and hung over coals.......dough bakes to a golden brown and cheese melts.....yummy.
 

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You can fry a flat bread, like tortilla or pancake thinness dough. Use them as bread or as wraps around something or even desserts with cinnamon and sugar or other filling. Flour is one of the most versatile items of food you can take with you.
There is also reflector oven baking, although I know little about that.
Not many people will hike very far with a Dutch oven.
 

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Shuriken snowflake
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Flat bread in a pan I think would work the best. I've made those on the stovetop and I used a mix of wheat, rye and barley, then milk (powder milk would be OK) and that recipe had both yeast and ammonium bicarbonate, dough was let to rise once then shaped into "pancakes" and fried in a hot pan. Could probably use instant yeast. If it was me I'd try out the recipe at home and see what the proportions were and then measure and mix all the dry ingredients at home just to add water when out there.
 

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Mix flour, salt, pepper( have this pre mixed, is better) and a little water,,,,,,,,work it up( you want it a little dry, not sticky)........work into a "snake", spiral around a clean stick(bark stripped), hang over coals........it will bake........My fav for a day hike lunch is dough wrapped around cheese dogs, skewered and hung over coals.......dough bakes to a golden brown and cheese melts.....yummy.
Leave it up to a "JARHEAD" to come up with something like that,,,I LIKE IT,,,I needed a good laugh after the way things have gone today,,,I will probably try this one out before too long,,,Thanks for the recipe,,,SEMPER FI:thumb:
 

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Leave it up to a "JARHEAD" to come up with something like that,,,I LIKE IT,,,I needed a good laugh after the way things have gone today,,,I will probably try this one out before too long,,,Thanks for the recipe,,,SEMPER FI:thumb:
Semper Fi, do or die.......I've cooked fresh water snails in Bamboo in the PI, my man( don't ask about how to catch monkey)......We don't sweat the petty stuff....food is the easy stuff......now, getting into some alcohol and trim, that's the hard part...:thumb:
 

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I make simple ones and twist them around a stick to cook near the fire. Turn them regularly until they're brown on the outside and they're pretty good.

1 cup flour, 1-2 tsp baking powder (I eyeball it) and 1/4-1/2 tsp salt according to your taste. Mix with enough water to make a sticky dough. Keep a little flour aside to dust your hands with. It makes rolling them out easier. Roll into a "rope" and twist around a stick. You can also add a little oil or butter to the dough if you want.
 

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Since its not really convenient to bake bread in the wilderness over a fire (you tell me a good way)
I have done this 2 different ways. Number one with a reflector oven on an open fire. I can't say it makes bread like mother used to make, but it is OK. The bread is small loaves, but the size of my fist. Otherwise I don't think you generate enough heat to cook a bigger loaf completely through.

Number two, which is my preference is Indian fry bread. You will need some oil to cook it in, which you will have to carry in a plastic bottle or something, but a cast iron skillet, some oil and Indian fry bread mix makes some awesome outdoor bread. If you don't mind a little more weight bringing in a small can of pie cherries or apples to top off the fry bread is really awesome! This is by far my favorite bread to make on the trail.
 

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Wanderer
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Bannock is one kind of fried bread, there are others. I prefer the flat breads and tortillas to raised breads. Baking is easily done in dutchovens, or reflector ovens, or hornos, mud ovens site built.
The cast iron dutchovens are somewhat heavy, but how many people will you need to feed?? A 6" dutchoven is plenty for two people, a 10" will feed 8 or so. Another thing is you can get aluminum do's, which are lighter and are fine to use. Yet another technique is to use a mess kit pan and plate to make a do, use heavy bulldog or binder clips to hold them together. Be very carefull with heat though as these thin metal pans heat quickly and unevenly and you'll probably have burned spots.
Hope that helps.
 

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Looked what I had at home, only flour really I could use was wheat and rye. I got a little of each in a bowl, sprinkled it with some instant yeast and added some baking powder. Added a slab of melted butter cooled off (would be oil if you cook outdoors) and last milk at about 110F (would be water when you're camping, and powder milk mixed in before.

Worked it together and shaped it into thin rounds and cooked them on rather high temp in an iron cast pan on the rooftop. I tried to use a little oil before and then not, and it didn't stick each way, just changed the taste. I don't know how much flour and milk I used but not a lot. I got 6 breads. Well, they are only 4 now.....

If you have any kind of pan that is heat resistant, you could do this over a campfire.



 

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I know of another use for flower to go with the bread.

It's a louisiana style gravy. :)

In a pan heat enough cooking oil (or olive oil), till when a pinch of flour is dropped in, it sizzles.

Slowly add flower till it is the consisency of pudding. This is called a roux. Stir on a med. heat constantly till the gravy is a little bit darker than you want. If it is clumping add a little more oil. If it is too thin the gravy will be oily.

Add a little of water at a time (while stirring), till it is the consistency that you want.

Salt and pepper to taste.

If you cook pork chops or another meat, the drippings can be substituted for the oil and is really yummy.

For white gravy add milk or powedered milk and water.

Practice makes perfect.

Enjoy
 
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