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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at silver to have in-hand and therefore as something still of value should our already-Monopoly paper finally go poof.

Any thoughts on combibars? I know it's a premium to get them, but I like the portioning as it were.

Any feedback is welcome, and I do already have the fundamentals for into/during Grid-Down World very well covered.
 

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I think the gold combibars are overpriced. 1/4 ounce bullion coins are a better buy if you want to stick with gold. If your looking for something smaller in value, go with silver. Sovereign silver bullion coins, 1 ounce.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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I was looking at silver to have in-hand and therefore as something still of value should our already-Monopoly paper finally go poof.

Any thoughts on combibars? I know it's a premium to get them, but I like the portioning as it were.

Any feedback is welcome, and I do already have the fundamentals for into/during Grid-Down World very well covered.
You wouldn't be able to trade with me because I wouldn't be able to validate their authenticity.

That's why I like other forms of silver like Eagles (too high a premium now), or junk silver coins (the pre-1965 silver US coins).

It's why I personally also don't like rounds. There are literally thousands of different kinds of silver rounds; how does one validate them as genuine and not fake?

Now, I get the issue of premiums; rounds have much lower premiums than Silver Eagles, for instance, or even junk silver, but if you were to trade with me, I'd almost certainly require you to accept a discount, not a premium.

This is my view of it; others have a different perspective.

[BTW, I just looked them up--they don't seem to have any lesser premium, and coupled with the difficulty of validating them, I don't see the attraction. If it's the ability to break off pieces to "make change," IMO you'd be better off with junk silver coins.]
 

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You wouldn't be able to trade with me because I wouldn't be able to validate their authenticity.

That's why I like other forms of silver like Eagles (too high a premium now), or junk silver coins (the pre-1965 silver US coins).

It's why I personally also don't like rounds. There are literally thousands of different kinds of silver rounds; how does one validate them as genuine and not fake?

Now, I get the issue of premiums; rounds have much lower premiums than Silver Eagles, for instance, or even junk silver, but if you were to trade with me, I'd almost certainly require you to accept a discount, not a premium.

This is my view of it; others have a different perspective.

[BTW, I just looked them up--they don't seem to have any lesser premium, and coupled with the difficulty of validating them, I don't see the attraction. If it's the ability to break off pieces to "make change," IMO you'd be better off with junk silver coins.]
I'm a fan of newer Maple Leaf silver rounds.

Premium is (usually) lower. Easy to identify.
 

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I like the gold and silver combi bars as a store of value, regardless of premium. I stack ounces not dollar amounts. Anyway, I’ve never really thought silver will work as a barter tool, as so very few own any to make it an effective means of trade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very appreciated! I am already seeing it differently.

Allow me one more - so if the thinking needs to be storing silver as oposed to currency as stored value and not use/barter, then that certainly changes things.

So would the mindset of having silver as helping start-over should things come back somewhat - would that be good thinking? I only see some cash as useful in that "Five Minutes til Midnight" gap.

Kind of mind-boggling to try and think of the value of something in dollars while assuming said dollars could be "worth less" or literally worthless.
 

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Criminitly!
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Let me preface this by say I have some bullion. There is room for it in the grand picture of things. However bullion can be confiscated. Any silver or gold coin issued by the US mint is well over 50 years now and considered an antique. It can not be confiscated because of the collector premium of the coin. If you buy gold, buy gold double eagles issued from the mint pre 1933. The biggest difference between bullion and collectible IS the government CONFISCATION of your wealth. That is why rich buy extremely collectible coins. That being said, if I had eggs and you have silver, we trade. I need to get rid of eggs before they spoil, you have silver that won’t spoil. I think the physical currency will be pulled for crypto long before the collapse. When the wheels cease because of lack of grease you better have silver to grease em so somebody can buy their whiskey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Anything we can name can be subject to confiscation. All it takes is the "pen and the phone" as one little elitist once bragged. Truthfully bragged, mind you.

It will come down to get and have what you can, keep or surrender it, live where and how you can.

This possibly applies to our very bodies. Wasn't or isn't there referrnces to FEMA and such - about property/food subject to confiscation and population being relocated and/or assigned to work?

Never forget the recent situation and how fellow humans were cast as a threat to public safety - even their speech was throttled and their jobs stripped away. And a large percentage of Americans were fine with it.

Not sure on that last stuff about FEMA, but with property, land, safety deposit boxes, guns, gold, silver - all of that - if they want it, it is declared theirs. If they don't want you using it, it will be declared illegal.
 

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Criminitly!
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Anything we can name can be subject to confiscation. All it takes is the "pen and the phone" as one little elitist once bragged. Truthfully bragged, mind you.

It will come down to get and have what you can, keep or surrender it, live where and how you can.

This possibly applies to our very bodies. Wasn't or isn't there referrnces to FEMA and such - about property/food subject to confiscation and population being relocated and/or assigned to work?

Never forget the recent situation and how fellow humans were cast as a threat to public safety - even their speech was throttled and their jobs stripped away. And a large percentage of Americans were fine with it.

Not sure on that last stuff about FEMA, but with property, land, safety deposit boxes, guns, gold, silver - all of that - if they want it, it is declared theirs. If they don't want you using it, it will be declared illegal.
Very true. However evil people will never take away from themselves. So there is always a loophole.
 

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Very appreciated! I am already seeing it differently.

Allow me one more - so if the thinking needs to be storing silver as oposed to currency as stored value and not use/barter, then that certainly changes things.

So would the mindset of having silver as helping start-over should things come back somewhat - would that be good thinking? I only see some cash as useful in that "Five Minutes til Midnight" gap.

Kind of mind-boggling to try and think of the value of something in dollars while assuming said dollars could be "worth less" or literally worthless.
Think of what you can purchase today, in dollars.

What would ~$30 buy you? (Spot + high premium) As an oversimplified start.

Another way to look at a POSSIBLE would be an average inflation over time.

Again, an oversimplified example, $1 in 1855 is an equivalent to ~$34 in today's dollar.
 
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Criminitly!
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Think of what you can purchase today, in dollars.

What would ~$30 buy you? (Spot + high premium) As an oversimplified start.

Another way to look at a POSSIBLE would be an average inflation over time.

Again, an oversimplified example, $1 in 1855 is an equivalent to ~$34 in today's dollar.
A Little over 2.5% of the original value.
 

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.could the gov due a reverse split take $ out of circulation like on the stock market but the entire currency ,
of course after drilling like crazy and selling our petroleum our currency is now worth 10 x current value funded by our nat, resources.
now take that super currency and build the wonderful green society the libs want. nope to many beers i think.
plus the 1% would not like that idea. unless you let them get a multiplier over the common citizen. just a random thought.
 

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Let me preface this by say I have some bullion. There is room for it in the grand picture of things. However bullion can be confiscated. Any silver or gold coin issued by the US mint is well over 50 years now and considered an antique. It can not be confiscated because of the collector premium of the coin. If you buy gold, buy gold double eagles issued from the mint pre 1933. The biggest difference between bullion and collectible IS the government CONFISCATION of your wealth. That is why rich buy extremely collectible coins. That being said, if I had eggs and you have silver, we trade. I need to get rid of eggs before they spoil, you have silver that won’t spoil. I think the physical currency will be pulled for crypto long before the collapse. When the wheels cease because of lack of grease you better have silver to grease em so somebody can buy their whiskey.
1) You can buy silver and gold coins minted by the US mint this year (2022). Why would they be considered antiques?
2) Why do you think coins with collector premiums can’t be confiscated?
3) What does extremely collectible mean?

I think you have built a giant fiction off the claim that the government won’t confiscate coins with numismatic value, because it is more difficult to fairly compensate the owner for something with subjective value like a rare coin. That’s like saying illegal guns won’t be confiscated in Alaska, because it’s cold, and a long plane ride from DC.
 

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1) You can buy silver and gold coins minted by the US mint this year (2022). Why would they be considered antiques?
2) Why do you think coins with collector premiums can’t be confiscated?
3) What does extremely collectible mean?

I think you have built a giant fiction off the claim that the government won’t confiscate coins with numismatic value, because it is more difficult to fairly compensate the owner for something with subjective value like a rare coin. That’s like saying illegal guns won’t be confiscated in Alaska, because it’s cold, and a long plane ride from DC.
Simply going by the historical information, such an assumption is reasonable. Not factual, simply reasonable.

The US gold buy back (confiscation) "... specifically exempted "customary use in industry, profession or art," a provision that covered artists, jewelers, dentists, signmakers, etcetera. The order also permitted any person to own up to $100 in gold coins, a face value equivalent to 5 troy ounces (160 g) of gold valued at approximately $10,000 in 2020. The same paragraph also exempted "gold coins having recognized special value to collectors of rare and unusual coins", which protected recognized gold coin collections from legal seizure and likely melting..."
 

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I was looking at silver to have in-hand and therefore as something still of value should our already-Monopoly paper finally go poof.

Any thoughts on combibars? I know it's a premium to get them, but I like the portioning as it were.

Any feedback is welcome, and I do already have the fundamentals for into/during Grid-Down World very well covered.
Had to look up the combibars.

I would not take any - old US silver coins or Mexican silver pesos? Sure.
 

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Simply going by the historical information, such an assumption is reasonable. Not factual, simply reasonable.

The US gold buy back (confiscation) "... specifically exempted "customary use in industry, profession or art," a provision that covered artists, jewelers, dentists, signmakers, etcetera. The order also permitted any person to own up to $100 in gold coins, a face value equivalent to 5 troy ounces (160 g) of gold valued at approximately $10,000 in 2020. The same paragraph also exempted "gold coins having recognized special value to collectors of rare and unusual coins", which protected recognized gold coin collections from legal seizure and likely melting..."
Its a reasonable theory for high value numismatic coins-pick a number-20% over melt, 50% over melt, maybe anything old and uncirculated.... Who knows what special value would mean until there is case law.

Good luck with arguing last years ASEs can’t be confiscated because they are government issued.
 

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Criminitly!
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1) You can buy silver and gold coins minted by the US mint this year (2022). Why would they be considered antiques?
2) Why do you think coins with collector premiums can’t be confiscated?
3) What does extremely collectible mean?

I think you have built a giant fiction off the claim that the government won’t confiscate coins with numismatic value, because it is more difficult to fairly compensate the owner for something with subjective value like a rare coin. That’s like saying illegal guns won’t be confiscated in Alaska, because it’s cold, and a long plane ride from DC.
So what would you suggest? Fine Whisky? Aspirin? Lumber? Coal? Many things will hold better value than a tanking dollar. I like my chances that I will have something that will hold value against a falling currency. Just because there is something mandated does not mean people will comply. Will you comply handing over everything you own? Is there nothing they wouldn't take?
 
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